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The first LEED homes in Greater China

Published on Written by Posted in LEED
No. 98 of Nanhexia, Guangling in the Yanzhou District of China’s Jiangsu Provinc
No. 98 of Nanhexia, Guangling in the Yanzhou District of China’s Jiangsu Province

The rapid urbanization of China is arguably the most environmentally significant human project on the planet. As China continues to grow, green buildings—indeed, a cross section of green buildings—is key to its continued future and in line with the country’s larger goals of a greener, healthier China. What better structure to help achieve this goal than a green home? Recently, pioneers of green buildings have successfully certified the first LEED homes in Greater China giving families environmentally sound, healthier and affordable spaces to live.

No. 98 of Nanhexia, Guangling in the Yanzhou District of China’s Jiangsu Province, is the first of 52 homes in the Province that will be certified using LEED. Built in the old city district of Nanhexia on the site of an abandoned factory, the project aims to improve the quality of life for local residents and provide a model for other municipalities in China to build new residential developments sustainably. The home maintains the traditional Yangzhou building style and courtyard design while incorporating energy saving technologies such as a ground source heat pump, PV system, a solar hot water heater and an impressive rainwater capture system.  No. 98, which is LEED Platinum certified, is was the first overseas project by the Florida-based Stalwart Green Global, known for their expertise in building and certifying LEED homes.

The home is two stories with, 1,259 conditioned space and five bedrooms. It also has a HERS index of 12 and uses about $245(7.4 MBtu) per year on electricity based on U.S. electric rate.

In Hong Kong, now home to 18 LEED certified residences, Blue Pool Road Residential was just certified. Hang Lung Properties Ltd.-- which constructed the home--believes a LEED home can honor its occupants by lower energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions, as well as providing better indoor environmental quality.  

Designed with facades inspired by traditional folding elements from Chinese culture, Blue Pool Road’s LEED homes are as green as they are beautiful. To reduce cooling and lighting loads, double glazing integrated with internal blinds is used to reduce solar heat gain. Programmable control of AC units, energy efficiency appliances and high energy efficiency light fixtures are also installed to reduce energy use. Each residence has been designed to save up to 7,300kWh per year.                                         

The development also specifically focused on material minimization and reuse. Green materials were carefully selected, including fly-ash concrete, recycled steels and FSC-certified wood products. Over 77 tons of waste generated from construction was also successfully recycled.

Affordable homes. Healthier homes. Homes that leave a smaller carbon footprint for a greener world. This is leadership at its finest. As USGBC’s Senior Vice President for Advocacy Roger Platt put it:

"Doing it right will take leadership like the kind shown by Stalwart Green Global and Hang Lung Properties. Doing it to the exacting LEED for Homes standards is reason for celebration."

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    Mika Kania made 8 contributions in the last 6 months

Mika Kania

LEED Project Manager

3 commentsLeave a comment

QA / LEED Project Specialist, EnergyLogic, Inc.
It was a great honor to work on the first LEED for Homes-certified project in Hong Kong. Such a beautiful country and beautiful homes! Check out http://nrglogic.com/builders/leed-for-homes/ for more information on how EnergyLogic helps projects achieve LEED certification.
owner, Green Living Projects
Any plans on rolling out LEED for Homes internationally soon?
LEED Project Manager, USGBC
Residential project in all countries can use LEED for Homes. Information on the program and eligible building types can be found here: http://www.usgbc.org/homes

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