Florida city passes green building ordinance | U.S. Green Building Council
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St. Petersburg, Florida, is making it clear that it counts among the ranks of U.S. cities dedicated to green building and infrastructure. The city has recently taken steps to codify sustainable practices through an ordinance that would require new and renovated city buildings and infrastructure to achieve LEED Gold certification and abide by Envision standards, respectively.

A 2017 executive order by Mayor Rick Kriseman started the city’s green development practices, but the ordinance is an important step toward solidifying green building standards in city policy. After it passes the city council, the ordinance will be entered into law for St. Petersburg’s public buildings.

The guidelines require that all newly constructed or renovated city buildings over 5,000 square feet achieve LEED Gold certification and that any infrastructure project over $2 million must reach Envision’s Gold certification standards, except for certain projects that will be eligible for exemption.

Both requirements are a foundational step in the city’s efforts to realize across-the-board efficiency improvements. The ordinance brings St. Petersburg in line with a nationwide movement of over 300 cities instituting and strengthening green building requirements. In Florida alone, cities like Tampa and St. Pete Beach have similar ordinances regulating state building efficiency.

St. Petersburg will become the next Florida city to make greener public buildings the standard. USGBC commends this leadership in building a local legacy of care for the community and all the people who live and work in St. Petersburg.

Read USGBC's policy brief on energy performance