Assessment and Planning for Resilience | U.S. Green Building Council
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LEED BD+C: New Construction | v4 - LEED v4

Assessment and Planning for Resilience

Possible 1 point

Intent

To encourage designers, planners and building owners/operators to proactively plan before design commences for the potential impacts of natural disasters or disturbances as well as address issues that impact long-term building performance such as changing climate conditions.

Requirements

Complete in pre-design a Hazard Assessment prerequisite plus at least one of two options of either Climate Resilience Planning or Emergency Preparedness Planning.

PREREQUISITE: Conduct Hazard Assessment for the Project Site

Step One:

Identify the potential high risks associated with natural hazards affecting the project site(s) and building function. In some cases these risks may include man-made events, such as power management accidents and terrorism; these are important variables that could be considered in planning.

  • For jurisdictions where mitigations plans are available:
    Refer to local, county, state and national hazard mitigation plans to identify high risk hazards that have been locally determined.
  • For jurisdictions where mitigations plans are not available:
    Consult with an environmental scientist to address all relevant conditions for the project site; consider the following resources to identify high hazard conditions.
  • For projects outside the United States:
    International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

Flooding

Step Two:

Document findings and review with the client and project team. Solicit input on site-specific risk and vulnerabilities to incorporate into the preliminary analysis. Based on the project goals, program and intended service for the life of the building, identify the top three hazards for further project planning or less If fewer than three hazards are identified.

1For projects outside the United States:
International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

ACHIEVE ONE OF THE TWO FOLLOWING OPTIONS, IN ADDITION TO THE PREREQUISITE

OPTION 1: Climate Resilience Planning
Step One:

Complete a vulnerability assessment of impacts associated with climate change for project site selection, programming/planning and design parameters.

Use the following resources to help determine future climate impacts:

  • For regions where local climate change studies are available:
    Refer to government regional, state and local climate change studies that identify local vulnerabilities. In all cases where local equivalent standards are used identify in the documentation.
  • For projects outside the United States where local climate change studies are not available:
    Consult with a climate scientist to address all relevant conditions for the project site where possible; International projects may use the U.S. standard or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.
  • For United States regions where local climate change studies are not available
    Consult with a climate scientist to address all relevant conditions for the project site where possible; consider the following resources to identify vulnerability conditions.

General Climate Change U.S. Regional Predictions
Use the middle-of-the-road projections as the minimum project basis of design unless research indicates otherwise. Reference: National Climate Assessment Report.

  • Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge
    Identify storm surge risk and impacts associated with sea level rise.

  • River Flooding Projections
    Identify if project is located in an area identified as a greater than 50% flood risk per following.

  • Winter Storms
    Identify if project is located in an area with a historical record of frequent winter storms or extreme cold events risk.

  • Temperature, Precipitation Changes and Storm Intensity
    Identify the range of project temperature, precipitation and storm intensity changes based on service life for different scenarios. Use the middle-of-the-road projections as the minimum project basis of design unless research indicates otherwise.

Issues to Consider:
In many cases scientists predict that climate change will make past hazard and climate-related events more frequent and intense. For example, drought, which climate models predict will become more frequent and of longer duration in some areas, increases wildfire risk, as does the die-off of trees that can occur when warming winters fail to keep wood-boring beetles in check, as has occurred in the Northern Rockies in recent decades. With temperature and precipitation reaching new extremes, winter storms and extreme heat events are also expected to be more frequent and intense.

As climate and environmental conditions change, associated negative impacts will as well , so damages from past events can be considered as a baseline when considering what's vulnerable.

Step Two:

Based on the project location, goals, and program, identify which climate change vulnerabilities are of highest priority for planning and design. Take into account the expected service life of the project and identify vulnerabilities based on changes predicted to take place during that time period. Consider the adaptive capacity of each population or resource. Robust infrastructure and strong social networks are two factors that can reduce vulnerability. Since the outcomes from high wind events, winter storms or extreme heat events often result in temporary loss of power, design teams are strongly encouraged to address passive survivability measures covered in Resilient Design Credit 3.

Share the vulnerability assessment and top priorities with the project team and client. Research and innovate to develop options that may reduce vulnerability or increase resilience to climate and natural resource conditions for the project. Address the following topics as applicable:

  • Project location and elevation
  • Adjacent site features and development
  • Availability of and access to services and infrastructure
  • Building envelope performance requirements
  • Building materials
  • Passive systems
  • Site design
  • Passive survivability (see Credit 3)
  • Other systems
OPTION 2: Emergency Preparedness Planning

Ensure that project owner or facility management staff have evaluated before design commences their emergency preparedness and that a measureable assessment program is in place for continuous improvement.

Prepare the Facility Description Form to identify the specific emergency preparedness features of the building.

Documentation

General

Register for the pilot credit

Pilot Credit Survey

Credit Specific

Documentation All Projects Option 1 Option 2
Custom template summarizing the hazard identification, reference documents, and determination of priorities
 
X    
Attach any site-specific custom analyses development
 
X    
Climate Resilience Planning template summarizing the
vulnerability identification and strategy assessment
  X  
Document how the analysis informed design decisions in the Project’s OPR and BOD   X  
Red Cross 123 Assessment™ form**
 
    X
Red Cross Facility Description™ form**
 
    X

** must be signed by the building owner

Prerequisite: Conduct Hazard Assessment for the Project Site

Submit the completed Assessment and Planning for Resilience Workbook that summarizes the hazard identification, reference documents, and determination of priorities. Attach any site-specific custom analyses developed. Demonstrate that analysis was completed prior to beginning of schematic design.

Where an alternative international standard has been used, document its equivalence with the applicable US-based standard.

AND

Option 1: Climate Resilience Planning
  1. Submit the completed Climate Resilience Planning template that summarizes the vulnerability identification and strategy assessment process. Document how the analysis was completed prior to schematic design and informed design decisions in the project’s OPR and BOD.
  2. Document where an alternative international or local standard has been used.

OR

Option 2: Emergency Preparedness Planning

Submit the following two completed forms signed by Owner:

  1. Red Cross 123 AssessmentTM Form
  2. Red Cross Facility DescriptionTM Form

The 123 Assessment form requires responses to preparedness questions but this credit option does not require attaining a designated performance score.

The Red Cross 123 AssessmentTM Form and Red Cross Facility DescriptionTM Form of the American Red Cross Ready RatingTM program are available online for free when you create an account (www.readyrating.org). Additionally, a written disclosure to the Red Cross is necessary for consent to share this Assessment with a third-party (GBCI).

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Sample forms

No sample form available for this credit.

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