Solid waste management | U.S. Green Building Council
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Solid waste management

MR2.1 | Possible point

Intent

To facilitate the reduction of waste and toxins generated from the use of ongoing consumable products by building occupants and building operations that are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

To facilitate the reduction of waste generated by building occupants that is hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

To facilitate the reduction of ongoing waste and toxins generated by building occupants and building operations that are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

To facilitate the reduction of waste and toxins generated from the use of durable goods by building occupants and building operations that are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

To divert construction and demolition debris from disposal to landfills and incineration facilities. Redirect recyclable recovered resources back to the manufacturing process and reusable materials to appropriate sites.

To reduce the volume of waste deposited in landfills. To promote the proper disposal of hazardous wastes.

To facilitate the reduction of waste and toxins generated from the use of ongoing consumable products by building occupants and building operations that are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

To facilitate the reduction of waste and toxins generated from the use of durable goods by building occupants and building operations that are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

To divert construction and demolition debris from disposal to landfills and incineration facilities. Redirect recyclable recovered resources back to the manufacturing process and reusable materials to appropriate sites.

To facilitate the reduction of waste and toxins generated from the use of ongoing consumable products by building occupants and building operations that are hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

To reduce the waste that is generated by building occupants and hauled to and disposed of in landfills and incinerators.

To reduce the waste that is generated by building occupants and hauled to and disposed of in landfills and incinerators.

To reduce the waste that is generated by building occupants and hauled to and disposed of in landfills and incinerators.

To divert construction, renovation, and demolition debris from disposal in landfills and incinerators and recover and recycle reusable materials.

To divert construction, renovation, and demolition debris from disposal in landfills and incinerators and recover and recycle reusable materials.

To reduce the volume of waste deposited in landfills and promote the proper disposal of hazardous waste.

To reduce the volume of waste deposited in landfills and promote the proper disposal of hazardous waste.

To avoid the environmental consequences of extracting and processing virgin materials by using recycled and reclaimed materials.

To avoid the environmental consequences of extracting and processing virgin materials by using recycled and reclaimed materials.

To facilitate the reduction of waste generated by building occupants that is hauled to and disposed of in landfills or incineration facilities.

To reduce the waste that is generated by building occupants and hauled to and disposed of in landfills and incinerators.

To reduce the environmental and air quality impacts of the materials acquired for use in the upgrade of buildings.

Requirements

Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that addresses materials with a low cost per unit that are regularly used and replaced through the course of business. These materials include at a minimum, paper, toner cartridges, glass, plastics, cardboard and old corrugated cardboard, food waste, and metals. Materials that may be considered either ongoing consumables or durable goods (see MR Credit 8: Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods) can be counted under either category provided consistency is maintained with MR Credit 8, with no contradictions, exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credits 1: Sustainable Purchasing—Ongoing Consumables and 5: Sustainable Purchasing—Food.

Reuse, recycle or compost 50% of the ongoing consumables waste stream (by weight or volume).

Have a battery recycling program in place that implements the battery recycling policy adopted in MR Prerequisite 2: Solid Waste Management Policy. The program must have a target of diverting at least 80% of discarded batteries from the trash, and actual diversion performance must be verified at least annually. The program must cover all portable dry-cell types of batteries, including single-use and/or rechargeables used in radios, phones, cameras, computers and other devices or equipment.

Have in place a solid waste management policy for the building and site addressing the requirements of the waste management credits listed below as well as recycling of all mercury-containing lamps. This policy must adhere to the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance policy model (see Introduction). At a minimum, the policy must cover the waste streams that are within the building and site management’s control.

  • MR Credit 7: Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables

  • MR Credit 8: Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods
  • MR Credit 9: Solid Waste Management—Facility Alterations and Additions

This prerequisite requires only policies, not ongoing actual sustainable performance.

Conduct a waste stream audit of the building’s entire ongoing consumables waste stream (not durable goods or construction waste for facility alterations and additions). Use the audit’s results to establish a baseline that identifies the types of waste making up the waste stream and the amounts of each type by weight or volume. Identify opportunities for increased recycling and waste diversion. The audit must be conducted during the performance period.

Maintain a waste reduction, reuse and recycling program that addresses durable goods (those that are replaced infrequently and/or may require capital program outlays to purchase). Durable goods include at a minimum, office equipment (computers, monitors, copiers, printers, scanners, fax machines), appliances (refrigerators, dishwashers, water coolers), external power adapters, televisions and other audiovisual equipment. Materials that may be considered either ongoing consumables (see MR Credit 7. Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables) or durable goods can be counted under either category provided consistency is maintained with MR Credit 7, with no contradictions, exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credit 2.1: Sustainable Purchasing—Electric Powered Equipment and MR Credit 2.2: Sustainable Purchasing—Furniture.

Reuse or recycle 75% of the durable goods waste stream (by weight, volume or replacement value) during the performance period.

Divert at least 70% of waste (by volume) generated by facility alterations and additions from disposal to landfills and incineration facilities. This applies only to base building elements permanently or semipermanently attached to the building itself that enter the waste stream during facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction additions. Base building elements include at a minimum, building components and structures (wall studs, insulation, doors, windows), panels, attached finishings (drywall, trim, ceiling panels), carpet and other flooring material, adhesives, sealants, paints and coatings. Furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators are also excluded.

Meet at least four of the following five requirements and publicize their availability and benefits:

  1. Include as part of the project at least one recycling or reuse station, available to all project occupants, dedicated to the separation, collection, and storage of materials for recycling; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides recycling services. The recyclable materials must include, at a minimum, paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics and metals.
  2. Include as part of the project at least one drop-off point, available to all project occupants, for potentially hazardous office or household wastes; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides collection services. Examples of potentially hazardous wastes include paints, solvents, oil, and batteries. If a plan for postcollection disposal or use does not exist, establish one.
  3. Include as part of the project at least one compost station or location, available to all project occupants, dedicated to the collection and composting of food and yard wastes; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides composting services. If a plan for postcollection use does not exist, establish one.
  4. On every mixed-use or nonresidential block or at least every 800 feet (245 meters), whichever is shorter, include recycling containers adjacent to other receptacles or recycling containers integrated into the design of the receptacle.
  5. Recycle and/or salvage at least 50% of nonhazardous construction and demolition debris. Develop and implement a construction waste management plan that, at a minimum, identifies the materials to be diverted from disposal and specifies whether the materials will be stored on-site or commingled. Excavated soil and land-clearing debris do not contribute to this credit. Calculations can be done by weight or volume but must be consistent throughout.

Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that addresses materials with a low cost per unit that are regularly used and replaced through the course of business. These materials include, but are not limited to, paper, toner cartridges, glass, plastics, cardboard and old corrugated cardboard, food waste and metals. Materials that may be considered either ongoing consumables or durable goods (see MR Credit 8) can be counted under either category provided consistency is maintained with MR Credit 8, with no contradictions, exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credits 1 and 5.

  • MR Credit 7.1 (1 point): Reuse, recycle or compost 50% of the ongoing consumables waste stream (by weight or volume).
  • MR Credit 7.2 (2 points): Reuse, recycle or compost 70% of the ongoing consumables waste stream (by weight or volume).

Have a battery recycling program in place that implements the battery recycling policy adopted in MR Prerequisite 2. The program must have a target of diverting at least 80% of discarded batteries from the trash, and actual diversion performance must be verified at least annually. The program must cover all portable dry-cell types of batteries, including single-use and/or rechargeables used in radios, phones, cameras, computers and other devices or equipment.

Maintain a waste reduction, reuse and recycling program that addresses durable goods that are replaced infrequently and/or may require capital program outlays to purchase. Examples include, but are not limited to, office equipment (computers, monitors, copiers, printers, scanners, fax machines), appliances (refrigerators, dishwashers, water coolers), external power adapters, televisions and other audiovisual equipment. Materials that may be considered either ongoing consumables (see MR Credit 7) or durable goods can be counted under either category provided consistency is maintained with MR Credit 7, with no contradictions, exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credit 2.

Reuse or recycle 75% of the durable goods waste stream (by weight, volume or replacement value) during the performance period.

Durable goods waste stream is defined as durable goods leaving the project building, site and organization that have fully depreciated and reached the end of their useful lives for normal business operations. Durable goods that remain useful and functional and are moved to another floor or building, etc. do not qualify. Leased durable goods returned to their owner at the end of their useful lives for normal business operations do qualify.

Divert at least 70% of waste (by volume) generated by facility alterations and additions from disposal to landfills and incineration facilities. This applies only to base building elements permanently or semipermanently attached to the building itself that enter the waste stream during facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction additions. Examples include, but are not limited to, building components and structures (wall studs, insulation, doors, windows), panels, attached finishings (drywall, trim, ceiling panels), carpet and other flooring material, adhesives, sealants, paints and coatings. Furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators are also excluded.

Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that addresses materials with a low cost per unit that are regularly used and replaced through the course of business. These materials include, but are not limited to, paper, toner cartridges, glass, plastics, cardboard and old corrugated cardboard, food waste and metals. Materials that may be considered either ongoing consumables or durable goods (see MR Credit 8) can be counted under either category provided consistency is maintained with MR Credit 8, with no contradictions, exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credits 1 and 5.

  • MR Credit 7.1 (1 point): Reuse, recycle or compost 50% of the ongoing consumables waste stream (by weight or volume).
  • MR Credit 7.2 (2 points): Reuse, recycle or compost 70% of the ongoing consumables waste stream (by weight or volume).

Have a battery recycling program in place that implements the battery recycling policy adopted in MR Prerequisite 2. The program must have a target of diverting at least 80% of discarded batteries from the trash, and actual diversion performance must be verified at least annually. The program must cover all portable dry-cell types of batteries, including single-use and/or rechargeables used in radios, phones, cameras, computers and other devices or equipment.

Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that reuses, recycles, or composts the following:

  • at least 50% of the ongoing waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight or volume); and

  • at least 75% of the durable goods waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight, volume or replacement value).

In addition, safely dispose of the following:

  • all discarded batteries; and

  • all mercury-containing lamps.

K–12 schools may exclude food waste from the final performance calculations of the total building waste stream by meeting both of the following requirements.

  • Provide documentation that food waste composting services are not available in the region or are not economically feasible, based on the school or district’s operational budget for solid waste management.

  • During the performance period, implement an awareness program that encourages occupants to reduce food waste. Compliant programs should include at least two of the following:
  1. signage in food service and cafeteria areas;

  2. food service employee training on reducing waste in food preparation and selecting menu options to reduce the potential for food waste; and
  3. extracurricular activities or student organizations that promote awareness of the environmental benefits associated with composting food waste.

Establishment

None.

Performance

Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that reuses, recycles, or composts the following:

  • at least 50% of the ongoing waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight or volume); and

  • at least 75% of the durable goods waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight, volume or replacement value).

In addition, safely dispose of the following:

  • all discarded batteries; and

  • all mercury-containing lamps.

Establishment

None.

Performance

Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that reuses, recycles, or composts the following:

  • at least 50% of the ongoing waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight or volume); and

  • at least 75% of the durable goods waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight, volume or replacement value).

In addition, safely dispose of the following:

  • all discarded batteries; and

  • all mercury-containing lamps.

K–12 schools may exclude food waste from the final performance calculations of the total building waste stream by meeting both of the following requirements.

  • Provide documentation that food waste composting services are not available in the region or are not economically feasible, based on the school or district’s operational budget for solid waste management.

  • During the performance period, implement an awareness program that encourages occupants to reduce food waste. Compliant programs should include at least two of the following:
  1. signage in food service and cafeteria areas;

  2. food service employee training on reducing waste in food preparation and selecting menu options to reduce the potential for food waste; and
  3. extracurricular activities or student organizations that promote awareness of the environmental benefits associated with composting food waste.

Divert at least 70% of the waste (by weight or volume) generated by facility maintenance and renovation activities from disposal in landfills and incinerators. Include base building elements as specified in the Materials and Resources prerequisite: Facility Maintenance and Renovation Policy.

Exclude furniture and furnishings that pose human health concerns (e.g., mold) as well as components not considered base building elements; mechanical, electrical, and plumbing components; and specialty items, such as elevators.

Establishment

None.

Performance

Divert at least 70% of the waste (by weight or volume) generated by facility maintenance and renovation activities from disposal in landfills and incinerators. Include base building elements as specified in the Materials and Resources prerequisite: Facility Maintenance and Renovation Policy.

Exclude furniture and furnishings that pose human health concerns (e.g., mold) as well as components not considered base building elements; mechanical, electrical, and plumbing components; and specialty items, such as elevators.

Meet at least four of the following five requirements and publicize their availability and benefits.

  1. Include as part of the project at least one recycling or reuse station, available to all project occupants, dedicated to the separation, collection, and storage of materials for recycling; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides recycling services. The recycling must cover at least paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics, and metals.
  2. Include as part of the project at least one drop-off point, available to all project occupants, for potentially hazardous office or household wastes and establish a plan for postcollection disposal or use; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides collection services. Examples of potentially hazardous wastes include paints, solvents, oil, mercury-containing lamps, electronic waste, and batteries.
  3. Include as part of the project at least one compost station or location, available to all project occupants, dedicated to the collection and composting of food and yard wastes, and establish a plan for postcollection use; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides composting services.
  4. On every mixed-use or nonresidential block or at least every 800 feet (245 meters), whichever is shorter, include recycling containers either adjacent to or integrated into the design of other receptacles.
  5. Recycle, reuse, or salvage at least 50% of nonhazardous construction, demolition, and renovation debris. Calculations can be done by weight or volume but must be consistent throughout. Develop and implement a construction waste management plan that identifies the materials to be diverted from disposal and specifies whether the materials will be stored on site or commingled. Reused or recycled asphalt, brick, and concrete (ABC) can account for no more than 75% of the diverted waste total. Excavated soil, land-clearing debris and materials contributing toward GIB Credit Building Reuse do not qualify for this credit. Include materials destined for alternative daily cover (ADC) in the calculations as waste (not diversion).

Meet at least four of the following five requirements and publicize their availability and benefits.

  1. Include as part of the project at least one recycling or reuse station, available to all project occupants, dedicated to the separation, collection, and storage of materials for recycling; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides recycling services. The recycling must cover at least paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics, and metals.
  2. Include as part of the project at least one drop-off point, available to all project occupants, for potentially hazardous office or household wastes and establish a plan for postcollection disposal or use; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides collection services. Examples of potentially hazardous wastes include paints, solvents, oil, mercury-containing lamps, electronic waste, and batteries.
  3. Include as part of the project at least one compost station or location, available to all project occupants, dedicated to the collection and composting of food and yard wastes, and establish a plan for postcollection use; or locate the project in a local government jurisdiction that provides composting services.
  4. On every mixed-use or nonresidential block or at least every 800 feet (245 meters), whichever is shorter, include recycling containers either adjacent to or integrated into the design of other receptacles.
  5. Recycle, reuse, or salvage at least 50% of nonhazardous construction, demolition, and renovation debris. Calculations can be done by weight or volume but must be consistent throughout. Develop and implement a construction waste management plan that identifies the materials to be diverted from disposal and specifies whether the materials will be stored on site or commingled. Reused or recycled asphalt, brick, and concrete (ABC) can account for no more than 75% of the diverted waste total. Excavated soil, land-clearing debris and materials contributing toward GIB Credit Building Reuse do not qualify for this credit. Include materials destined for alternative daily cover (ADC) in the calculations as waste (not diversion).

Use materials for new infrastructure such that the sum of the postconsumer recycled content, on-site reused materials and one-half of the preconsumer recycled content constitutes at least 50% of the total mass of infrastructure materials.

Count materials in all of the following infrastructure items, as applicable:

  • roadways, parking lots, sidewalks, unit paving, and curbs;

  • water retention tanks and vaults;
  • base and sub-base materials for the above; and
  • rainwater, sanitary sewer, steam energy distribution, and water piping.

Recycled content is defined in accordance with ISO/IEC 14021, Environmental Labels and Declaration, Self-Declared Environmental Claims (Type II environmental labeling).

Use materials for new infrastructure such that the sum of the postconsumer recycled content, on-site reused materials and one-half of the preconsumer recycled content constitutes at least 50% of the total mass of infrastructure materials.

Count materials in all of the following infrastructure items, as applicable:

  • roadways, parking lots, sidewalks, unit paving, and curbs;

  • water retention tanks and vaults;
  • base and sub-base materials for the above; and
  • rainwater, sanitary sewer, steam energy distribution, and water piping.

Recycled content is defined in accordance with ISO/IEC 14021, Environmental Labels and Declaration, Self-Declared Environmental Claims (Type II environmental labeling).

Have in place a solid waste management policy for the building and site addressing the requirements of the waste management credits listed below as well as recycling of all mercury-containing lamps. This policy must adhere to the LEED 2009 for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance policy model (see Introduction). At a minimum, the policy must cover the waste streams that are within the building and site management’s control.

  • MR Credit 7: Solid Waste Management—Ongoing Consumables

  • MR Credit 8: Solid Waste Management—Durable Goods
  • MR Credit 9: Solid Waste Management—Facility Alterations and Additions

This prerequisite requires only policies, not ongoing actual sustainable performance.

LEED CI and LEED CI Retail projects must demonstrate that they have control of their waste stream.
Core and Shell Projects:

Please note that since LEED-EB is a whole building rating system, when attempting an Innovation in Design point for following a LEED-EB perquisite or credit compliance path the strategy must be applied to the entire project building. For LEED-CS projects please provide a copy of a legally binding tenant sales and lease agreement documentation that the tenants meet the requirement of the LEED-EB strategy.

Please note that since LEED O+M is a whole building rating system, when attempting an Innovation in Design point for following a LEED O+M prerequisite or credit compliance path the strategy must be applied to the entire project building. For LEED Core and Shell projects please provide a copy of a legally binding tenant sales and lease agreement documentation that the tenants meet the requirement of the LEED O+M strategy.

Establishment

None.

Performance

Maintain a waste reduction and recycling program that reuses, recycles, or composts the following:

  • at least 50% (or at least 20% [1 point] or 40% [2 points] for Multifamily) of the ongoing waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight or volume); and

  • at least 75% (50% for Multifamily) of the durable goods waste as specified in Materials and Resources Prerequisite: Ongoing Purchasing and Waste Policy (by weight, volume or replacement value).

In addition, safely dispose of the following:

  • all discarded batteries; and

  • all mercury-containing lamps.
This pilot credit is an alternative compliance path to:

ACP language is in bold.

Sustainable purchasing – facility alterations and additions

Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering materials for facility renovations, demolitions, refits and new construction additions. This applies only to base building elements1 permanently or semipermanently attached to the building itself. Materials considered furniture, fixtures and equipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are excluded from this credit. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators are also excluded from this credit.

A sample calculaton for this credit is available in the LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Operations & Maintenance, 2009 Edition. Achieve sustainable purchases of 50% of total purchases (by cost) during the performance period. Sustainable purchases shall meet 1 or more of the following criteria:

  • Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.

  • Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from off-site or outside the organization.
  • Purchases contain at least 70% material salvaged from on-site, through an internal organization materials and equipment reuse program.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewable material.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% material harvested and processed or extracted and processed within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) radius of the project. Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula:
    (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ≤ 500 miles [800 kilometers]

  • Adhesives and sealants have a VOC content less than the current VOC content limits of South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168, or sealants used as fillers meet or exceed the requirements of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Regulation 8, Rule 51.
  • Paints and coating have VOC emissions not exceeding the VOC and chemical component limits of Green Seal’s Standard GS-11 requirements.
  • Noncarpet finished flooring meets one of the following requirements and constitutes a minimum of 25% of the finished floor area:
    • Is FloorScore certified

    • Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice.
    • Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:
      • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point

      • Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than ½ of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points.
        If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7.
  • Carpet meets one of the following requirements:
    • Meets CRI Green Label Plus Carpet Testing Program

    • Maximum VOC concentrations are less than or equal to those specified in the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, using the office scenario as defined in Table 7.5 within the practice. The additional VOC concentration limits listed in Section 9.1a must also be met
    • Maximum VOC concentrations meet the California requirements specified above based on the following:
      • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using test results obtained at the 14 day time point

      • Projects outside the U.S. may use the German AgBB/DIBt testing method and all testing methods based on AgBB/DIBt method (GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) using test results obtained at the 3 day or 7 day or 14 day time point. For caprolactam, if test result obtained at the 3 day or 7 day time point is used, the emission concentration must be less than ½ of the concentration limit specified above because the emission may not have peaked at the measured time points.
        If a European testing method (AgBB/DIBt GUT, EMICODE, Blue Angel) had used parameters for calculating test results different from those specified in the referenced California method, then the European test results for carpets or floorings need to be converted into California air concentrations by multiplication with 0.7.
  • Carpet cushion meets the requirements of the CRI Green Label Testing Program.
  • Composite panels and agrifiber2 products contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins.
  • Pilot Alternative Compliance Path – Legal Wood

    Purchases consist of at least 50% Certified Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10. Wood products sourced from Certified Sources are credited at 100% of their value provided:

    • All wood products are verified to be from Legal (non-controversial) Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10.
    • And

    • At least 70% (based on cost) of all wood products on the project are from Responsible Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10.

Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains both 10% postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts twice in the calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing).

Materials for alterations or additions must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

Sustainable Purchasing: Ongoing Consumables

This is an alternative compliance path to LEED v2009 O+M: Sustainable purchasing - ongoing consumables

ACP language is in bold.

Maintain a sustainable purchasing program covering materials with a low cost per unit that are regularly used and replaced through the course of business. These materials include at a minimum, paper (printing or copy paper, notebooks, notepads, envelopes), toner cartridges, binders, batteries and desk accessories. Food and beverages are excluded from this credit but are covered under MR Credit 5. Sustainable Purchasing - Food. For materials that may be considered either ongoing consumables or durable goods (see MR Credits 2.1 and 2.2), the project team is free to decide which category to put them in as long as consistency is maintained with MR Credits 2.1 and 2.2, with no contradictions, exclusions or double-counting. Consistency must also be maintained with MR Credit 7.

A template calculator for MR c1 is available in LEED Online 3 as a credit submittal. One point is awarded to projects that achieve sustainable purchases of at least 60%, of total purchases (by cost) during the performance period. Sustainable purchases are those that meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • Purchases contain at least 10% postconsumer and/or 20% postindustrial material.

  • Purchases contain at least 50% rapidly renewable materials.
  • Purchases contain at least 50% materials harvested and processed or extracted and processed within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) radius of the project. Building materials or products shipped by rail or water have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500 mile (800 kilometer) total travel distance of the project site using a weighted average determined through the following formula:
    (Distance by rail/3) + (Distance by inland waterway/2) + (Distance by sea/15) + (Distance by all other means) ≤ 500 miles [800 kilometers]

  • Purchases consist of at least 50% Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)–certified paper products.
  • Batteries are rechargeable.

Each purchase can receive credit for each sustainable criterion met (i.e., a $100 purchase that contains both 10% postconsumer recycled content and 50% of content harvested within 500 miles of the project counts twice in the calculation, for a total of $200 of sustainable purchasing).

Legal Wood Pilot Alternative Compliance Path


Purchases consist of at least 50% Certified Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10. Paper and wood products sourced from Certified Sources are credited at 100% of their value provided:

  • All paper and wood products are verified to be from Legal (non-controversial) Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10.
  • And

  • At least 70% (based on cost) of all paper and wood products on the project are from Responsible Sources as defined by ASTM D7612-10.

Ongoing consumables must be purchased during the performance period to earn points in this credit.

Documentation Requirements

General

Register for the pilot credit

Pilot Credit Survey

Credit Specific

Complete the Legal Wood Calculator, found on the resources tab of this credit.

Survey Questions

  • where is this project located (city, state/province, country)
  • does the country/region the project is located in have existing laws/regulations regarding legal wood? are they effectively enforced?
  • how much wood, relative to other materials, was used on this project (by cost)?
  • prior to attempting this credit, what was your understanding of illegal wood in the buildings industry supply chain in your region?
  • prior to the work the project team did on this credit, was verified legal wood something that was required in any standard project spec used by the project team?
    • if yes, what specific language was used?
    • if no, did the project team develop standard specification language for future use?
  • What specific piece of this ACP was the most difficult:
    • 100% legality verification?
    • 70% responsibly sourced verification?
    • procurement of certified wood?
  • was legality documentation readily available from your upstream wood suppliers?
    • what documentation were they able to provide?
    • was this the first time that a project team asked the supplier for documentation to verify legality for wood?
  • who, on the project team, was responsible for documentation? did the project team need to hire an outside expert to facilitate achievement?
  • Did this credit influence or change the wood that was ultimately used on the project?
  • One of the goals of this ACP is to assess the feasibility of the creation of a prerequisite around legal sourcing of building materials.
    • How transformational do you think a prerequisite requiring legality verification for forest products would be?
    • How feasible do you think a prerequisite requiring legality verification of forest products would be?
    • How feasible do you think legality verification of all materials would be?

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