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Resource reuse

MR3 | Possible point

Intent

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock to conserve resources, reduce waste, and reduce adverse environmental effects of new buildings related to materials manufacturing and transport.

To encourage the preservation and adaptive use of historic buildings and cultural landscapes that represent significant embodied energy and cultural value, in a manner that preserves historic materials and character-defining features.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of buildings and conserve resources, reduce waste, and reduce environmental harm from materials manufacturing and transport for new buildings.

To extend the life cycle of buildings and conserve resources, reduce waste, and reduce environmental harm from materials manufacturing and transport for new buildings.

To respect local and national landmarks and conserve material and cultural resources by encouraging the preservation and adaptive reuse of historic buildings and cultural landscapes.

To respect local and national landmarks and conserve material and cultural resources by encouraging the preservation and adaptive reuse of historic buildings and cultural landscapes.

To encourage adaptive reuse and optimize the environmental performance of products and materials.

To encourage adaptive reuse and optimize the environmental performance of products and materials.

To encourage adaptive reuse and optimize the environmental performance of products and materials.

To encourage adaptive reuse and optimize the environmental performance of products and materials.

To encourage adaptive reuse and optimize the environmental performance of products and materials.

To encourage adaptive reuse and optimize the environmental performance of products and materials.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

To extend the life cycle of existing building stock, conserve resources, retain cultural resources, reduce waste and reduce environmental impacts of new buildings as they relate to materials manufacturing and transport.

Requirements

Maintain the existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (the exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and nonstructural roofing material).

Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained.

The minimum percentage building reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

Building Reuse Points
55% 1
75% 2
95% 3

If the project includes an addition that is more than 6 times (for Core & Shell) and 2 times (for New Construction and Schools) the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Maintain the existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (the exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and nonstructural roofing material).

Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained.

The minimum percentage building reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

Building Reuse Points
75% 1
95% 2

If the project includes an addition that is more than 6 times (for Core & Shell) and 2 times (for New Construction and Schools) the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Maintain the existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (the exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and nonstructural roofing material). The minimum percentage building reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

Building Reuse Points
55% 1
75% 2
95% 3

Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition that is more than twice the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Maintain the existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (the exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and nonstructural roofing material).

Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained.

The minimum percentage building reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

Building Reuse Points
25% 1
33% 2
42% 3
50% 4
75% 5

If the project includes an addition that is more than 6 times (for Core & Shell) and 2 times (for New Construction and Schools) the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Maintain the existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (the exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material). The minimum percentage building reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. Calculate the total area of existing exterior envelope and existing building structure to ensure that the credit goals have been met. Building materials demolished to create courtyards to increase daylighting may be counted as retained in calculations for this credit, provided that the new courtyards meet the requirements of IEQ Credit 8.2: Daylight and Views. If the project includes an addition that is more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Use only areas (square footage) to calculate the quantity of preserved materials. The area to be used in the denominator is the sum of all new and reused floor or roof area and the exterior envelope, including the ground floor, to account for slabs-on-grade and footings or the exterior wall area. The area to be used in the numerator is the sum of reused floor, roof or wall area.

Use existing interior nonstructural elements (e.g., interior walls, doors, floor coverings and ceiling systems) in at least 50% (by area) of the completed building, including additions. If the project includes an addition with square footage more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Maintain at least 40% or 60% by area of the existing non-shell, nonstructural components (e.g., walls, flooring and ceiling systems). The minimum percentage interior component reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

Interior Reuse Points
40% 1
60% 2

Use existing interior nonstructural elements (e.g., interior walls, doors, floor coverings and ceiling systems) in at least 50% (by area) of the completed building, including additions. Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope shall be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition with square footage more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Reuse the existing habitable building stock, achieving the greater of the following two benchmarks (based on surface area):

  1. 50% of one existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (including exterior skin and framing but excluding window assemblies and nonstructural roofing material).
  2. 20% of the total existing building stock (including structure and envelope, as defined above).

Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope must be excluded from the calculations.

AND

For all projects

Do not demolish any historic buildings or contributing buildings in a historic district, or portions thereof, or alter any cultural landscapes as part of the project.

An exception is granted only if such action has been approved by an appropriate review body. For buildings listed locally, approval must be granted by the local historic preservation review board, or equivalent. For buildings listed in a state register or in the National Register of Historic Places (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the State Historic Preservation Office (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

To achieve this credit, at least one historic building or cultural landscape must be present on the project site.

Do not demolish any historic buildings, or portions thereof, or alter any cultural landscapes as part of the project.

An exception is granted only if such action has been approved by an appropriate review body. For buildings or landscapes listed locally, approval must be granted by the local historic preservation review board, or equivalent. For buildings or landscapes listed in a state register or in the National Register of Historic Places (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the State Historic Preservation Office (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

If any cultural landscapes or historic buildings in the project site are to be rehabilitated, restored, or preserved, rehabilitate in accordance with local review or national standards for rehabilitation, whichever is more restrictive, using one of the following approaches:

  1. Obtain approval, in the form of a “certificate of appropriateness,” from a locally appointed historic preservation commission or architectural review board for any exterior alterations or additions.
  2. If government funds are used for the project, obtain confirmation from a national historic preservation office or the National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) that the rehabilitation satisfies the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).
  3. If a building or site is listed in or determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) but is not subject to national or local review board review, include on the project team a preservation professional who meets the U.S. federal, or accepted national, qualifications for historic architect and attests to conformance to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

Maintain at least 75% (based on surface area) of existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material). Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope shall be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building.

Maintain an additional 20% (95% total, based on surface area) of existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material). Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope shall be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building.

Use existing interior non-structural elements (interior walls, doors, floor coverings and ceiling systems) in at least 50% (by area) of the completed building (including additions). If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building.

Maintain at least 40% by area of the existing non-shell, non-structure components (walls, flooring and ceilings).

Maintain at least 60% by area of the existing non-shell, non-structure components (walls, flooring and ceiling systems).

Maintain at least 75% (based on surface area) of existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material). Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope shall be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building.

Maintain an additional 20% (95% total, based on surface area) of existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material). Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope shall be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building.

Use existing interior non-structural elements (interior walls, doors, floor coverings and ceiling systems) in at least 50% (by area) of the completed building (including additions). If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building.

Maintain at least 25% (based on surface area) of existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material). Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope shall be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 6 times the square footage of the pre-existing building.

1 point in addition to MRc1.1.

Maintain at least 50% (based on surface area) of existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material). Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope shall be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 6 times the square footage of the pre-existing building.

1 point in addition to MRc1.1 & MRc1.2.

Maintain at least 75% (based on surface area) of existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material). Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project scope shall be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained. If the project includes an addition to an existing building, this credit is not applicable if the square footage of the addition is more than 6 times the square footage of the pre-existing building.

Maintain at least 75% of existing building structure and shell (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material).

1 point in addition to MR 1.1

Maintain an additional 25% (100% total) of existing building structure and shell (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material).

1 point in addition to MR 1.1 & 1.2

Maintain 100% of existing building structure and shell (exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and non-structural roofing material) AND at least 50% of non-shell areas (interior walls, doors, floor coverings and ceiling systems).

Reuse large portions of existing structures during renovation or redevelopment projects. Maintain at least 75% of existing building structure and shell (exterior skin and framing excluding window assemblies).

Reuse large portions of existing structures during renovation or redevelopment projects. Maintain an additional 25% (100% total) of existing building structure and shell (exterior skin and framing excluding window assemblies).

Reuse large portions of existing structures during renovation or redevelopment projects. Maintain 100% of existing building structure and shell AND 50% non-shell (walls, floor coverings, and ceiling systems).

Case 1. five buildings or fewer

For projects with five or fewer buildings undergoing major renovations, reuse 50% of one such building, based on surface area. Calculations must include structural elements (e.g., floors, roof decking) and enclosure materials (e.g., skin, framing). Exclude from the calculations window assemblies, nonstructural roofing material, and any hazardous materials that are remediated as part of the project.

Case 2. more than five buildings

For projects with more than five buildings undergoing major renovations, reuse 20% of the total surface area of such buildings (including structure and enclosure materials, as defined in Case 1).

Case 1. five buildings or fewer

For projects with five or fewer buildings undergoing major renovations, reuse 50% of one such building, based on surface area. Calculations must include structural elements (e.g., floors, roof decking) and enclosure materials (e.g., skin, framing). Exclude from the calculations window assemblies, nonstructural roofing material, and any hazardous materials that are remediated as part of the project.

Case 2. more than five buildings

For projects with more than five buildings undergoing major renovations, reuse 20% of the total surface area of such buildings (including structure and enclosure materials, as defined in Case 1).

For All Projects

Do not demolish any historic buildings or contributing buildings in a historic district, or portions thereof, or alter any cultural landscapes as part of the project.

An exception is granted only with approval from an appropriate review body. For buildings or landscapes listed locally, approval must be granted by the local historic preservation review board, or equivalent. For buildings or landscapes listed in a state register or in the National Register of Historic Places (or equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

For All Projects

Do not demolish any historic buildings or contributing buildings in a historic district, or portions thereof, or alter any cultural landscapes as part of the project.

An exception is granted only with approval from an appropriate review body. For buildings or landscapes listed locally, approval must be granted by the local historic preservation review board, or equivalent. For buildings or landscapes listed in a state register or in the National Register of Historic Places (or equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

This credit is available to projects with at least one historic building, contributing building in a historic district, or cultural landscape on the project site.

Do not demolish any historic buildings or contributing buildings in a historic district, or portions thereof, or alter any cultural landscapes as part of the project.

An exception is granted only with approval from an appropriate review body. For buildings or landscapes listed locally, approval must be granted by the local historic preservation review board, or equivalent. For buildings or landscapes listed in a state register or in the National Register of Historic Places (or equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

If any historic building or a contributing building in a historic district in the project site is to be altered (rehabilitated, preserved, or restored), use one of the following approaches for each building, as applicable.

  • Building subject to local review. Obtain approval, in the form of a certificate of appropriateness, from a local historic preservation commission or architectural review board for any exterior alterations or additions.

  • Building subject to state or federal review. If the building is subject to review by a state historic preservation office or the National Park Service (or equivalent body for projects outside the U.S.), the alteration must meet the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (or equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).
  • Listed or eligible building not subject to review. If a building is listed or determined eligible but alteration is not subject to local, state, or federal review, include on the project team a preservation professional who meets the U.S. federal qualifications for historic architects or architectural historians (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.). The preservation professional must confirm adherence to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.

If a cultural landscape is to be rehabilitated, restored, or preserved, do so in accordance with the Guidelines for the Treatment of Cultural Landscapes or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S. whichever is more stringent.

This credit is available to projects with at least one historic building, contributing building in a historic district, or cultural landscape on the project site.

Do not demolish any historic buildings or contributing buildings in a historic district, or portions thereof, or alter any cultural landscapes as part of the project.

An exception is granted only with approval from an appropriate review body. For buildings or landscapes listed locally, approval must be granted by the local historic preservation review board, or equivalent. For buildings or landscapes listed in a state register or in the National Register of Historic Places (or equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

If any historic building or a contributing building in a historic district in the project site is to be altered (rehabilitated, preserved, or restored), use one of the following approaches for each building, as applicable.

  • Building subject to local review. Obtain approval, in the form of a certificate of appropriateness, from a local historic preservation commission or architectural review board for any exterior alterations or additions.

  • Building subject to state or federal review. If the building is subject to review by a state historic preservation office or the National Park Service (or equivalent body for projects outside the U.S.), the alteration must meet the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (or equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).
  • Listed or eligible building not subject to review. If a building is listed or determined eligible but alteration is not subject to local, state, or federal review, include on the project team a preservation professional who meets the U.S. federal qualifications for historic architects or architectural historians (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.). The preservation professional must confirm adherence to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.

If a cultural landscape is to be rehabilitated, restored, or preserved, do so in accordance with the Guidelines for the Treatment of Cultural Landscapes or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S. whichever is more stringent.

Demonstrate reduced environmental effects during initial project decision-making by reusing existing building resources or demonstrating a reduction in materials use through life-cycle assessment. Achieve one of the following options.

Option 1. historic building reuse (5 points)

Maintain the existing building structure, envelope, and interior nonstructural elements of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district. To qualify, the building or historic district must be listed or eligible for listing in the local, state, or national register of historic places. Do not demolish any part of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district unless it is deemed structurally unsound or hazardous. For buildings listed locally, approval of any demolition must be granted by the local historic preservation review board. For buildings listed in a state register or the U.S. National Register of Historic Places (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

Any alteration (preservation, restoration, or rehabilitation) of a historic building or a contributing building in a historic district on the project site must be done in accordance with local or national standards for rehabilitation, whichever are applicable. If building is not subject to historic review, include on the project team a preservation professional who meets U.S. federal qualifications for historic architects (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.); the preservation professional must confirm conformance to the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

Option 1. historic building reuse (6 points)

Maintain the existing building structure, envelope, and interior nonstructural elements of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district. To qualify, the building or historic district must be listed or eligible for listing in the local, state, or national register of historic places. Do not demolish any part of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district unless it is deemed structurally unsound or hazardous. For buildings listed locally, approval of any demolition must be granted by the local historic preservation review board. For buildings listed in a state register or the U.S. National Register of Historic Places (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

Any alteration (preservation, restoration, or rehabilitation) of a historic building or a contributing building in a historic district on the project site must be done in accordance with local or national standards for rehabilitation, whichever are applicable. If building is not subject to historic review, include on the project team a preservation professional who meets U.S. federal qualifications for historic architects (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.); the preservation professional must confirm conformance to the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

Option 2. renovation of abandoned or blighted building (5 points)

Maintain at least 50%, by surface area, of the existing building structure, enclosure, and interior structural elements for buildings that meet local criteria of abandoned or are considered blight. The building must be renovated to a state of productive occupancy. Up to 25% of the building surface area may be excluded from credit calculation because of deterioration or damage.

Option 2. renovation of abandoned or blighted building (6 points)

Maintain at least 50%, by surface area, of the existing building structure, enclosure, and interior structural elements for buildings that meet local criteria of abandoned or are considered blight. The building must be renovated to a state of productive occupancy. Up to 25% of the building surface area may be excluded from credit calculation because of deterioration or damage.

Option 3. building and material reuse (2–4 points)

Reuse or salvage building materials from off site or on site as a percentage of the surface area, as listed in Table 1. Include structural elements (e.g., floors, roof decking), enclosure materials (e.g., skin, framing), and permanently installed interior elements (e.g., walls, doors, floor coverings, ceiling systems). Exclude from the calculation window assemblies and any hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project.

Materials contributing toward this credit may not contribute toward MR Credit Building Product Disclosure and Optimization - Sourcing of Raw Materials.

Table 1. Points for reuse of building materials

Percentage of completed project surface area reused Points BD&C Points BD&C (Core and Shell)
25% 2 2
50% 3 3
75% 4 5

Option 3. building and material reuse (2–5 points)

Reuse or salvage building materials from off site or on site as a percentage of the surface area, as listed in Table 1. Include structural elements (e.g., floors, roof decking), enclosure materials (e.g., skin, framing), and permanently installed interior elements (e.g., walls, doors, floor coverings, ceiling systems). Exclude from the calculation window assemblies and any hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project.

Materials contributing toward this credit may not contribute toward MR Credit Material Disclosure and Optimization.

Table 1. Points for reuse of building materials

Percentage of completed project surface area reused Points BD&C Points BD&C (Core and Shell)
25% 2 2
50% 3 3
75% 4 5

Option 4. whole-building life-cycle assessment (3 points)

For new construction (buildings or portions of buildings), conduct a life-cycle assessment of the project’s structure and enclosure that demonstrates a minimum of 10% reduction, compared with a baseline building, in at least three of the six impact categories listed below, one of which must be global warming potential. No impact category assessed as part of the life-cycle assessment may increase by more than 5% compared with the baseline building.

The baseline and proposed buildings must be of comparable size, function, orientation, and operating energy performance as defined in EA Prerequisite Minimum Energy Performance. The service life of the baseline and proposed buildings must be the same and at least 60 years to fully account for maintenance and replacement. Use the same life-cycle assessment software tools and data sets to evaluate both the baseline building and the proposed building, and report all listed impact categories. Data sets must be compliant with ISO 14044.

Select at least three of the following impact categories for reduction:

  • global warming potential (greenhouse gases), in CO2e;

  • depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, in kg CFC-11;
  • acidification of land and water sources, in moles H+ or kg SO2;
  • eutrophication, in kg nitrogen or kg phosphate;
  • formation of tropospheric ozone, in kg NOx, kg O3, or kg ethene; and
  • depletion of nonrenewable energy resources, in MJ.

For all options in this credit, building materials demolished to create courtyards to increase daylighting may be counted as retained in calculations, provided the new courtyards meet the requirements of EQ Credits Daylight and Quality Views.

Demonstrate reduced environmental effects during initial project decision-making by reusing existing building resources or demonstrating a reduction in materials use through life-cycle assessment. Achieve one of the following options.

Option 1. historic building reuse (5 points)

Maintain the existing building structure, envelope, and interior nonstructural elements of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district. To qualify, the building or historic district must be listed or eligible for listing in the local, state, or national register of historic places. Do not demolish any part of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district unless it is deemed structurally unsound or hazardous. For buildings listed locally, approval of any demolition must be granted by the local historic preservation review board. For buildings listed in a state register or the U.S. National Register of Historic Places (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

Any alteration (preservation, restoration, or rehabilitation) of a historic building or a contributing building in a historic district on the project site must be done in accordance with local or national standards for rehabilitation, whichever are applicable. If building is not subject to historic review, include on the project team a preservation professional who meets U.S. federal qualifications for historic architects (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.); the preservation professional must confirm conformance to the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

OR

Option 2. renovation of abandoned or blighted building (5 points)

Maintain at least 50%, by surface area, of the existing building structure, enclosure, and interior structural elements for buildings that meet local criteria of abandoned or are considered blight. The building must be renovated to a state of productive occupancy. Up to 25% of the building surface area may be excluded from credit calculation because of deterioration or damage.

Option 3. building and material reuse (2–4 points)

Reuse or salvage building materials from off site or on site as a percentage of the surface area, as listed in Table 1. Include structural elements (e.g., floors, roof decking), enclosure materials (e.g., skin, framing), and permanently installed interior elements (e.g., walls, doors, floor coverings, ceiling systems). Exclude from the calculation window assemblies and any hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project.

Materials contributing toward this credit may not contribute toward MR Credit Building Product Disclosure and Optimization - Sourcing of Raw Materials.

Table 1. Points for reuse of building materials

Percentage of completed project surface area reused Points BD&C Points BD&C (Core and Shell)
25% 2 2
50% 3 3
75% 4 5

Option 4. whole-building life-cycle assessment (3 points)

For new construction (buildings or portions of buildings), conduct a life-cycle assessment of the project’s structure and enclosure that demonstrates a minimum of 10% reduction, compared with a baseline building, in at least three of the six impact categories listed below, one of which must be global warming potential. No impact category assessed as part of the life-cycle assessment may increase by more than 5% compared with the baseline building.

The baseline and proposed buildings must be of comparable size, function, orientation, and operating energy performance as defined in EA Prerequisite Minimum Energy Performance. The service life of the baseline and proposed buildings must be the same and at least 60 years to fully account for maintenance and replacement. Use the same life-cycle assessment software tools and data sets to evaluate both the baseline building and the proposed building, and report all listed impact categories. Data sets must be compliant with ISO 14044.

Select at least three of the following impact categories for reduction:

  • global warming potential (greenhouse gases), in CO2e;

  • depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, in kg CFC-11;
  • acidification of land and water sources, in moles H+ or kg SO2;
  • eutrophication, in kg nitrogen or kg phosphate;
  • formation of tropospheric ozone, in kg NOx, kg O3, or kg ethene; and
  • depletion of nonrenewable energy resources, in MJ.

Demonstrate reduced environmental effects during initial project decision-making by reusing existing building resources or demonstrating a reduction in materials use through life-cycle assessment. Achieve one of the following options.

Option 1. historic building reuse (5 points)

Maintain the existing building structure, envelope, and interior nonstructural elements of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district. To qualify, the building or historic district must be listed or eligible for listing in the local, state, or national register of historic places. Do not demolish any part of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district unless it is deemed structurally unsound or hazardous. For buildings listed locally, approval of any demolition must be granted by the local historic preservation review board. For buildings listed in a state register or the U.S. National Register of Historic Places (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

Any alteration (preservation, restoration, or rehabilitation) of a historic building or a contributing building in a historic district on the project site must be done in accordance with local or national standards for rehabilitation, whichever are applicable. If building is not subject to historic review, include on the project team a preservation professional who meets U.S. federal qualifications for historic architects (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.); the preservation professional must confirm conformance to the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

OR

Option 2. renovation of abandoned or blighted building (5 points)

Maintain at least 50%, by surface area, of the existing building structure, enclosure, and interior structural elements for buildings that meet local criteria of abandoned or are considered blight. The building must be renovated to a state of productive occupancy. Up to 25% of the building surface area may be excluded from credit calculation because of deterioration or damage.

Option 3. building and material reuse (2–4 points)

Reuse or salvage building materials from off site or on site as a percentage of the surface area, as listed in Table 1. Include structural elements (e.g., floors, roof decking), enclosure materials (e.g., skin, framing), and permanently installed interior elements (e.g., walls, doors, floor coverings, ceiling systems). Exclude from the calculation window assemblies and any hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project.

Materials contributing toward this credit may not contribute toward MR Credit Building Product Disclosure and Optimization - Sourcing of Raw Materials.

Table 1. Points for reuse of building materials

Percentage of completed project surface area reused Points BD&C Points BD&C (Core and Shell)
25% 2 2
50% 3 3
75% 4 5

Option 4. whole-building life-cycle assessment (3 points)

For new construction (buildings or portions of buildings), conduct a life-cycle assessment of the project’s structure and enclosure that demonstrates a minimum of 10% reduction, compared with a baseline building, in at least three of the six impact categories listed below, one of which must be global warming potential. No impact category assessed as part of the life-cycle assessment may increase by more than 5% compared with the baseline building.

The baseline and proposed buildings must be of comparable size, function, orientation, and operating energy performance as defined in EA Prerequisite Minimum Energy Performance. The service life of the baseline and proposed buildings must be the same and at least 60 years to fully account for maintenance and replacement. Use the same life-cycle assessment software tools and data sets to evaluate both the baseline building and the proposed building, and report all listed impact categories. Data sets must be compliant with ISO 14044.

Select at least three of the following impact categories for reduction:

  • global warming potential (greenhouse gases), in CO2e;

  • depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, in kg CFC-11;
  • acidification of land and water sources, in moles H+ or kg SO2;
  • eutrophication, in kg nitrogen or kg phosphate;
  • formation of tropospheric ozone, in kg NOx, kg O3, or kg ethene; and
  • depletion of nonrenewable energy resources, in MJ.

For all options in this credit, building materials demolished to create courtyards to increase daylighting may be counted as retained in calculations, provided the new courtyards meet the requirements of EQ Credits Daylight and Quality Views.

Demonstrate reduced environmental effects during initial project decision-making by reusing existing building resources or demonstrating a reduction in materials use through life-cycle assessment. Achieve one of the following options.

Option 1. historic building reuse (6 points)

Maintain the existing building structure, envelope, and interior nonstructural elements of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district. To qualify, the building or historic district must be listed or eligible for listing in the local, state, or national register of historic places. Do not demolish any part of a historic building or contributing building in a historic district unless it is deemed structurally unsound or hazardous. For buildings listed locally, approval of any demolition must be granted by the local historic preservation review board. For buildings listed in a state register or the U.S. National Register of Historic Places (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.), approval must appear in a programmatic agreement with the state historic preservation office or National Park Service (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

Any alteration (preservation, restoration, or rehabilitation) of a historic building or a contributing building in a historic district on the project site must be done in accordance with local or national standards for rehabilitation, whichever are applicable. If building is not subject to historic review, include on the project team a preservation professional who meets U.S. federal qualifications for historic architects (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.); the preservation professional must confirm conformance to the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

OR

Option 2. renovation of abandoned or blighted building (6 points)

Maintain at least 50%, by surface area, of the existing building structure, enclosure, and interior structural elements for buildings that meet local criteria of abandoned or are considered blight. The building must be renovated to a state of productive occupancy. Up to 25% of the building surface area may be excluded from credit calculation because of deterioration or damage.

Option 3. building and material reuse (2–5 points)

Reuse or salvage building materials from off site or on site as a percentage of the surface area, as listed in Table 1. Include structural elements (e.g., floors, roof decking), enclosure materials (e.g., skin, framing), and permanently installed interior elements (e.g., walls, doors, floor coverings, ceiling systems). Exclude from the calculation window assemblies and any hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project.

Materials contributing toward this credit may not contribute toward MR Credit Material Disclosure and Optimization.

Table 1. Points for reuse of building materials

Percentage of completed project surface area reused Points BD&C Points BD&C (Core and Shell)
25% 2 2
50% 3 3
75% 4 5

Option 4. whole-building life-cycle assessment (3 points)

For new construction (buildings or portions of buildings), conduct a life-cycle assessment of the project’s structure and enclosure that demonstrates a minimum of 10% reduction, compared with a baseline building, in at least three of the six impact categories listed below, one of which must be global warming potential. No impact category assessed as part of the life-cycle assessment may increase by more than 5% compared with the baseline building.

The baseline and proposed buildings must be of comparable size, function, orientation, and operating energy performance as defined in EA Prerequisite Minimum Energy Performance. The service life of the baseline and proposed buildings must be the same and at least 60 years to fully account for maintenance and replacement. Use the same life-cycle assessment software tools and data sets to evaluate both the baseline building and the proposed building, and report all listed impact categories. Data sets must be compliant with ISO 14044.

Select at least three of the following impact categories for reduction:

  • global warming potential (greenhouse gases), in CO2e;

  • depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, in kg CFC-11;
  • acidification of land and water sources, in moles H+ or kg SO2;
  • eutrophication, in kg nitrogen or kg phosphate;
  • formation of tropospheric ozone, in kg NOx, kg O3, or kg ethene; and
  • depletion of nonrenewable energy resources, in MJ.
Option 1. interior reuse (2 points)

Reuse or salvage interior nonstructural elements for at least 50% of the surface area. Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation.

Option 2. furniture reuse (1 point)

Reuse, salvage, or refurbish furniture and furnishings for at least 30% of the total furniture and furnishings cost.

Option 3. design for flexibility (1 pointI)

Conduct an integrative planning process to increase the useful life of the project space. Increase project space flexibility, ease of adaptive use, and recycling of building materials while considering differential durability and premature obsolescence over building design life and individual component service lives. Use at least three of the following strategies.

  • Install accessible systems (floor or ceiling) for at least 50% of the project floor area to allow for flexible use of space and access to systems (under floor distribution systems) not entangled with other building systems.

  • Design at least 50% of interior nonstructural walls, ceilings, and floors to be movable or demountable.
  • Ensure that at least 50%, by cost, of nonstructural materials have integral labels (radio frequency identification, engraving, embossing, or other permanent marking) containing information on material origin, properties, date of manufacture, in compliance with Canadian Standards Association CSA Z782-06 Guideline for Design for Disassembly and Adaptability in Buildings.
  • Include in at least one major component or systems purchase contract a clause specifying sub-contractor, vendor, or on site take back system.
  • Ensure that at least 50% of nonstructural materials, by cost, are reusable or recyclable, as defined by the Federal Trade Commission Guide for Use of Environmental Marketing Claims, 260.12. [Canada ACP]
  • Implement flexible power distribution (i.e., plug-and-play) systems for at least 50% of the project floor area so that lighting, data, voice, and other systems can be easily reconfigured and repurposed.
  • Implement a flexible lighting control system with plug and play components such as wall controls, sensors, and dimming ballasts for a minimum of 50% of the lighting load. The system shall allow for reconfiguring and repurposing of luminaires and controls without rewiring such as having the capability to group and assign luminaires into zones and change those zones as needed. Also, the system shall be flexible so that as a space changes functions, the lighting levels can change to suit the needs of the space without rewiring or removing or adding luminaires.
Option 3. design for flexibility (2 points)

Conduct an integrative planning process to increase the useful life of the project space. Increase project space flexibility, ease of adaptive use, and recycling of building materials while considering differential durability and premature obsolescence over building design life and individual component service lives. Use at least three of the following strategies.

  • Install accessible systems (floor or ceiling) for at least 50% of the project floor area to allow for flexible use of space and access to systems (under floor distribution systems) not entangled with other building systems.

  • Design at least 50% of interior nonstructural walls, ceilings, and floors to be movable or demountable.
  • Ensure that at least 50%, by cost, of nonstructural materials have integral labels (radio frequency identification, engraving, embossing, or other permanent marking) containing information on material origin, properties, date of manufacture, in compliance with Canadian Standards Association CSA Z782-06 Guideline for Design for Disassembly and Adaptability in Buildings.
  • Include in at least one major component or systems purchase contract a clause specifying sub-contractor, vendor, or on site take back system.
  • Ensure that at least 50% of nonstructural materials, by cost, are reusable or recyclable, as defined by the Federal Trade Commission Guide for Use of Environmental Marketing Claims, 260.7(d). [Canada ACP]
  • Implement flexible power distribution (i.e., plug-and-play) systems for at least 50% of the project floor area so that lighting, data, voice, and other systems can be easily reconfigured and repurposed.
  • Implement a flexible lighting control system with plug and play components such as wall controls, sensors, and dimming ballasts for a minimum of 50% of the lighting load. The system shall allow for reconfiguring and repurposing of luminaires and controls without rewiring such as having the capability to group and assign luminaires into zones and change those zones as needed. Also, the system shall be flexible so that as a space changes functions, the lighting levels can change to suit the needs of the space without rewiring or removing or adding luminaires.
Option 1. interior reuse (2 points)

Reuse or salvage interior nonstructural elements for at least 50% of the surface area. Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation.

AND/OR

Option 2. furniture reuse (1 point)

Reuse, salvage, or refurbish furniture and furnishings for at least 30% of the total furniture and furnishings cost.

Option 3. design for flexibility (1 pointI)

Conduct an integrative planning process to increase the useful life of the project space. Increase project space flexibility, ease of adaptive use, and recycling of building materials while considering differential durability and premature obsolescence over building design life and individual component service lives. Use at least three of the following strategies.

  • Install accessible systems (floor or ceiling) for at least 50% of the project floor area to allow for flexible use of space and access to systems (under floor distribution systems) not entangled with other building systems.

  • Design at least 50% of interior nonstructural walls, ceilings, and floors to be movable or demountable.
  • Ensure that at least 50%, by cost, of nonstructural materials have integral labels (radio frequency identification, engraving, embossing, or other permanent marking) containing information on material origin, properties, date of manufacture, in compliance with Canadian Standards Association CSA Z782-06 Guideline for Design for Disassembly and Adaptability in Buildings.
  • Include in at least one major component or systems purchase contract a clause specifying sub-contractor, vendor, or on site take back system.
  • Ensure that at least 50% of nonstructural materials, by cost, are reusable or recyclable, as defined by the Federal Trade Commission Guide for Use of Environmental Marketing Claims, 260.12. [Canada ACP]
  • Implement flexible power distribution (i.e., plug-and-play) systems for at least 50% of the project floor area so that lighting, data, voice, and other systems can be easily reconfigured and repurposed.
  • Implement a flexible lighting control system with plug and play components such as wall controls, sensors, and dimming ballasts for a minimum of 50% of the lighting load. The system shall allow for reconfiguring and repurposing of luminaires and controls without rewiring such as having the capability to group and assign luminaires into zones and change those zones as needed. Also, the system shall be flexible so that as a space changes functions, the lighting levels can change to suit the needs of the space without rewiring or removing or adding luminaires.

Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

Canada ACP - Environmental Claims

Projects in Canada may consider Environmental Claims: A Guide for Industry and Advertisers as an equivalent to the Federal Trade Commission Guide for Use of Environmental Marketing Claims, 260.7(d).

Option 1. interior reuse (2 points)

Reuse or salvage interior nonstructural elements for at least 50% of the surface area. Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation.

OR

Option 2. furniture reuse (1 point)

Reuse, salvage, or refurbish furniture and furnishings for at least 30% of the total furniture and furnishings cost.

Option 3. design for flexibility (2 points)

Conduct an integrative planning process to increase the useful life of the project space. Increase project space flexibility, ease of adaptive use, and recycling of building materials while considering differential durability and premature obsolescence over building design life and individual component service lives. Use at least three of the following strategies.

  • Install accessible systems (floor or ceiling) for at least 50% of the project floor area to allow for flexible use of space and access to systems (under floor distribution systems) not entangled with other building systems.

  • Design at least 50% of interior nonstructural walls, ceilings, and floors to be movable or demountable.
  • Ensure that at least 50%, by cost, of nonstructural materials have integral labels (radio frequency identification, engraving, embossing, or other permanent marking) containing information on material origin, properties, date of manufacture, in compliance with Canadian Standards Association CSA Z782-06 Guideline for Design for Disassembly and Adaptability in Buildings.
  • Include in at least one major component or systems purchase contract a clause specifying sub-contractor, vendor, or on site take back system.
  • Ensure that at least 50% of nonstructural materials, by cost, are reusable or recyclable, as defined by the Federal Trade Commission Guide for Use of Environmental Marketing Claims, 260.7(d). [Canada ACP]
  • Implement flexible power distribution (i.e., plug-and-play) systems for at least 50% of the project floor area so that lighting, data, voice, and other systems can be easily reconfigured and repurposed.
  • Implement a flexible lighting control system with plug and play components such as wall controls, sensors, and dimming ballasts for a minimum of 50% of the lighting load. The system shall allow for reconfiguring and repurposing of luminaires and controls without rewiring such as having the capability to group and assign luminaires into zones and change those zones as needed. Also, the system shall be flexible so that as a space changes functions, the lighting levels can change to suit the needs of the space without rewiring or removing or adding luminaires.

Alternative Compliance Paths (ACPs)

Canada ACP - Environmental Claims

Projects in Canada may consider Environmental Claims: A Guide for Industry and Advertisers as an equivalent to the Federal Trade Commission Guide for Use of Environmental Marketing Claims, 260.7(d).

Maintain the existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (the exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and nonstructural roofing material).

Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained.

The minimum percentage building reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

Building Reuse Points
55% 1
75% 2
95% 3

If the project includes an addition that is more than 6 times (for Core & Shell) and 2 times (for New Construction and Schools) the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Use existing interior nonstructural elements (e.g., interior walls, doors, floor coverings and ceiling systems) in at least 50% (by area) of the completed building, including additions. If the project includes an addition with square footage more than 2 times the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

Maintain the existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (the exterior skin and framing, excluding window assemblies and nonstructural roofing material).

Hazardous materials that are remediated as a part of the project must be excluded from the calculation of the percentage maintained.

The minimum percentage building reuse for each point threshold is as follows:

Building Reuse Points
25% 1
33% 2
42% 3
50% 4
75% 5

If the project includes an addition that is more than 6 times (for Core & Shell) and 2 times (for New Construction and Schools) the square footage of the existing building, this credit is not applicable.

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