Please upgrade your browser. This site requires a newer version to work correctly. Read more
Our "watch" feature allows you to stay current on all aspects of this specific credit. In your account, you can control what you get updated on and how you receive your notifications. Hide

Pilot credit

PCMaster | Possible point

Intent

Reduce bird injury and mortality from in-flight collisions with buildings.

To establish the minimum level of operating energy efficiency performance relative to typical buildings of similar type to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

To reduce energy consumption by using efficient medical and other equipment.

To support the installation of distributed renewable energy generation.

Improve or have no negative impacts on the outdoor acoustical environment as a result of new or major renovation building construction.

To maximize opportunities for integrated, cost-effective adoption of green design and construction strategies.

To promote walking, biking, and other non-motorized transportation that results in reduced vehicle miles traveled (VMT), increased public health, and enhanced community participation.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To increase night sky access, improve nighttime visibility, and reduce the consequences of development for wildlife and people.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To increase night sky access, improve nighttime visibility, and reduce development impacts on wildlife environments.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To reduce runoff volume and improve water quality by replicating the natural hydrology and water balance of the site, based on historical conditions and undeveloped ecosystems in the region.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To reduce runoff volume and improve water quality through replicating the natural hydrology and water balance of the site, based on historical conditions and undeveloped ecosystems in the region.

To assess site conditions prior to design in order to evaluate sustainable options and inform related decisions about site design.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To preserve and improve ecological integrity while supporting high-performance building operations.

To increase the efficiency of wastewater reuse by encouraging water reuse, reduction or recovery.

To conserve water used for cooling tower makeup while controlling microbes, corrosion, and scale in the condenser water system.

To conserve water used for cooling tower makeup while controlling microbes, corrosion, and scale in the condenser water system.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To reduce the burden on water supply and wastewater systems by increasing the water efficiency of appliances and water-consuming processes.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To reduce the burden on water supply and wastewater systems by increasing the water efficiency of appliances and water-consuming processes.

To increase participation in Demand Response technologies and programs that make energy generation and distribution systems more efficient, increase grid reliability, and reduce environmental impacts and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To increase participation in Demand Response technologies and programs that make energy generation and distribution systems more efficient, increase grid reliability, and reduce environmental impacts and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To provide for the ongoing accountability of building energy consumption over time.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To provide for the ongoing accountability of building energy consumption over time.

To further support the design, construction, and eventual operation of a project that meets the owner project requirements related to energy, water, indoor environmental quality and durability.

To prevent contaminant releases to air from products of combustion.

To improve the performance of the building by enabling energy efficient behavior in building occupants.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To increase the use of products and materials with life cycles, ingredients, and attributes that improve overall environmental, economic and social performance.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To increase the use of products and materials with life cycles, ingredients, and attributes that improve overall environmental, economic and social performance.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products verified to have been extracted or sourced in a responsible manner.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products verified to have been extracted or sourced in a responsible manner.

To increase the use of products and materials that disclose chemical ingredient data and reduce the concentrations of chemical contaminants that can damage air quality, human health, productivity, and the environment.

To increase the use of products and materials that disclose chemical ingredient data and reduce the concentrations of chemical contaminants that can damage air quality, human health, productivity, and the environment.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life-cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life-cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products from manufacturers who have verified improved environmental life-cycle impacts.

To increase the use of products and materials that disclose chemical ingredient data.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To increase the use of products and materials with life cycles and ingredients that improve overall environmental, economic and social performance.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To reduce concentrations of chemical contaminants that can damage air quality, human health, productivity, and the environment.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

Provide for occupant comfort by establishing quality criteria for interior lighting within a space.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

Provide for occupant comfort by establishing quality criteria for interior lighting within a space.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To provide workspaces and classrooms that promote occupants’ well-being, productivity, and communications through effective acoustic design.

To promote healthy, comfortable, and productive work by designing the workplace to accommodate its users.

To promote healthy, comfortable, and productive work by designing the workplace to accommodate its users.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To promote projects that are well connected to the community at large. To encourage development within existing communities that minimizes vehicle miles traveled. To improve public health by encouraging daily physical activity.

To reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use.

To improve the overall water efficiency of the home by completing an approved bundle of water efficiency measures that are third-party verified by a water efficiency expert.

To reduce the materials needed for and waste produced from future maintenance, repair, renovation and rehabilitation through structural, mechanical, and user-induced design.

Provide acoustic comfort by minimizing intruding noise into and within buildings.

To provide advanced monitoring and reconciliation of energy and water use at the whole building and end use levels. To provide for the ongoing accountability of building utility consumption over time.

Implement an integrative process that supports high performance, cost-effective project outcomes through analyses of key systems interrelationships before decisions are made on building form and throughout the design process.

Implement an integrative process that supports high performance, cost-effective project outcomes through analyses of key systems interrelationships before decisions are made on building form and throughout the design process.

To increase the efficiency of wastewater reuse by encouraging water reuse, reduction or recovery.

To contribute to the comfort and well-being of building occupants by establishing minimum standards for indoor air quality (IAQ).

To contribute to the comfort and well-being of building occupants by establishing minimum standards for indoor air quality (IAQ).

Reduce bird injury and mortality from in-flight collisions with buildings.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To minimize the health and climate impacts to local communities from diesel engine emissions associated with construction activities.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To reduce construction and demolition waste disposed of in landfills and incineration facilities by recovering, reusing, and recycling materials.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To reduce pollution by promoting alternatives to conventionally fueled automobiles.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions by designing to maximize opportunities for solar design.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To reduce energy consumption by ensuring that heating and cooling systems operate at peak efficiency.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To minimize exposure of building occupants, indoor surfaces, and ventilation air distribution systems to environmental tobacco smoke.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life-cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life-cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products for which the chemical ingredients in the product are inventoried using an accepted methodology and for selecting products verified to minimize the use and generation of harmful substances. To reward raw material manufacturers who produce products verified to have improved life-cycle impacts.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life-cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life-cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products for which the chemical ingredients in the product are inventoried using an accepted methodology and for selecting products verified to minimize the use and generation of harmful substances. To reward raw material manufacturers who produce products verified to have improved life-cycle impacts.

Pilot Credit Closed

This pilot credit is closed to new registrations

To reduce the burden on water supply and wastewater systems by increasing the water efficiency of appliances and water-consuming processes.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To improve the building’s overall energy performance and reduce its greenhouse gas emissions.

Improve the health of building users through physical activity while reducing environmental impacts.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

Improve the health of building users through physical activity while reducing environmental impacts.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life-cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life-cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products for which the chemical ingredients in the product are inventoried using an accepted methodology and for selecting products verified to minimize the use and generation of harmful substances. To reward raw material manufacturers who produce products verified to have improved life-cycle impacts.

To increase the use of interior finishes and furnishings with verified preferable multi-attribute environmental profiles.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To increase the use of interior finishes and furnishings with verified preferable multi-attribute environmental profiles.

Improve human health and well-being, community involvement, and education on food production by designing and maintaining the site for food production

Improve human health and well-being, community involvement, and education on food production by designing and maintaining the site for food production

Improve human health and well-being, community involvement, and education on food production by designing and maintaining the site for food production

To reduce energy consumption by using efficient medical and other equipment.

To support the installation of distributed renewable energy generation.

To improve the performance of the building by enabling energy efficient behavior in building occupants.

To prevent contaminant releases to air from products of combustion.

To establish the minimum level of operating energy efficiency performance relative to typical buildings of similar type to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with excessive energy use.

Improve or have no negative impacts on the outdoor acoustical environment as a result of new or major renovation building construction.

To promote walking, biking, and other non-motorized transportation that results in reduced vehicle miles traveled (VMT), increased public health, and enhanced community participation.

Reduce bird injury and mortality from in-flight collisions with buildings.

To encourage occupant engagement and provide optimal comfort through control of the heating and cooling in their space, and to educate occupants on their heating and cooling choices.

To reduce environmental impact through building product and material selection, promote transparency, and encourage market transformation in the field of materials and material ingredients.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life-cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life-cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products for which the chemical ingredients in the product are inventoried using an accepted methodology and for selecting products verified to minimize the use and generation of harmful substances. To reward raw material manufacturers who produce products verified to have improved life-cycle impacts.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

Improve the health of building users through physical activity while reducing environmental impacts.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life-cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life-cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products for which the chemical ingredients in the product are inventoried using an accepted methodology and for selecting products verified to minimize the use and generation of harmful substances. To reward raw material manufacturers who produce products verified to have improved life-cycle impacts.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life-cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life-cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products for which the chemical ingredients in the product are inventoried using an accepted methodology and for selecting products verified to minimize the use and generation of harmful substances. To reward raw material manufacturers who produce products verified to have improved life-cycle impacts.

To increase the efficiency of wastewater reuse by encouraging water reuse, reduction or recovery.

To improve the overall water efficiency of the home by completing an approved bundle of water efficiency measures that are third-party verified by a water efficiency expert.

To reduce the materials needed for and waste produced from future maintenance, repair, renovation and rehabilitation through structural, mechanical, and user-induced design.

Provide acoustic comfort by minimizing intruding noise into and within buildings.

To promote healthy, comfortable, and productive work by designing the workplace to accommodate its users.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To increase the use of interior finishes and furnishings with verified preferable multi-attribute environmental profiles.

To encourage occupant engagement and provide optimal comfort through control of the heating and cooling in their space, and to educate occupants on their heating and cooling choices.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To minimize the health and climate impacts to local communities from diesel engine emissions associated with construction activities.

To contribute to the comfort and well-being of building occupants by establishing minimum standards for indoor air quality (IAQ).

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To minimize the health and climate impacts to local communities from diesel engine emissions associated with construction activities.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

Improve the health of building users through physical activity while reducing environmental impacts.

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To encourage the use of products and materials for which life-cycle information is available and that have environmentally, economically, and socially preferable life-cycle impacts. To reward project teams for selecting products for which the chemical ingredients in the product are inventoried using an accepted methodology and for selecting products verified to minimize the use and generation of harmful substances. To reward raw material manufacturers who produce products verified to have improved life-cycle impacts.

Improve human health and well-being, community involvement, and education on food production by designing and maintaining the site for food production

This is a pilot credit. To use any pilot credit on your LEED project, be sure to register here. Documentation requirements and additional questions are listed below.

To reduce energy consumption by ensuring that heating and cooling systems operate at peak efficiency.

Encourage any and all members of the project team to promote and further social equity by integrating strategies that address identified social and community needs and disparities among those affected by the project by:

  • Creating fairer, healthier, and more supportive environments for those who work/live in the project
  • Responding to the needs of the surrounding community to promote a fair distribution of benefits and burdens
  • Promoting fair trade, respect for human rights, and other equity practices among disadvantaged communities

Encourage any and all members of the project team to promote and further social equity by integrating strategies that address identified social and community needs and disparities among those affected by the project by:

  • Creating fairer, healthier, and more supportive environments for those who work/live in the project
  • Encouraging corporate social responsibility at an organizational level by the firms of the project owner, financier, architects/engineers, contractors, product manufacturers, etc.
  • Promoting fair trade, respect for human rights, and other equity practices among disadvantaged communities
  • Creating more equitable, healthier environments for building construction workers.

Encourage any and all members of the project team to promote and further social equity by integrating strategies that address identified social and community issues, needs and disparities among those affected by the project by:

  • Promoting fair trade, respect for human rights, and other equity practices among disadvantaged communities
  • Creating more equitable, healthier environments for those affected by manufacturing of the materials created for the project.

Requirements

Comply with one of the Building Façade options, one of the Interior Lighting options, one of the Exterior Lighting options, and the Post-Construction Monitoring Plan requirements below.

Building façade requirements

Develop a building façade design strategy to make the building visible as a physical barrier and eliminate conditions that create confusing reflections to birds. If all materials on the building façade have a Threat Factor of 15 or below, the project is exempt from the building façade requirements and the following Bird Collision Threat Rating calculations are not required.

Bird collision threat rating

If any material on the building façade has a Threat Factor above 15, then the Bird Collision Threat Rating calculations are required. First separate the building into Façade Zone 1 or Façade Zone 2. Façade Zone 1 includes the first 3 floors above ground level, as well as 1 floor above any green roofs. Façade Zone 2 includes all façade areas above the 3rd floor. Then identify the Material Types present on the building façade and the Threat Factor of each type (for detailed material types and associated threat factors, see the Bird Collision Deterrence: Summary of Material Threat Factors table developed by the American Bird Conservancy). Determine the total area of each Material Type.

No more than 15% of the glazed area in Façade Zone 1 can have a Threat Factor higher than 75. However, more than 15% of the glazed area in Zone 2 may have a Factor higher than 75. All glazed corners or fly-through conditions must have a Threat Factor less than or equal to 25.

Using the formulas below, achieve a maximum total building Bird Collision Threat Rating (BCTR) of 15 or less.

First, for each Façade Zone, perform the following calculation:

[((Material Type 1 Threat Factor) x (Material Type Area)) + ((Material Type 2 Threat Factor) x (Material Type Area))…] / [Total Façade Zone Area] = Façade Zone BCTR

Then determine the total building Bird Collision Threat Rating by performing the following calculation with the Zone 1 and Zone 2 BCTRs:

[((Zone 1 BCTR) x 2) + (Zone 2 BCTR) ] / 3 = Total Building BCTR

AND

Interior Lighting Requirements

Develop a lighting design strategy to effectively eliminate or reduce light trespass from the building. The lighting in all spaces with a direct line of sight to exterior fenestration shall meet at least one of these two options:

Exterior lighting requirements

Develop a lighting design strategy to effectively reduce or eliminate light trespass from exterior fixtures. Meet the exterior and garage lighting power density and controls requirements in sections 9.4.1.3, 9.4.1.7, 9.4.3, of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1- 2010 (with errata but without addenda).

Post-construction monitoring plan requirements

Develop a three-year post-construction monitoring plan to routinely monitor the effectiveness of the building design in preventing bird collisions. Include methods to identify and document locations of the building where repeated bird strikes occur, the number of collisions, the date, the approximate time (if known), and features that may be contributing to collisions. The plan should also provide a process for corrective action.

Credit Specific

Building Façade

  • If all materials on the building have a Threat Factor of 15 or below and the project did not perform the calculations, submit a narrative describing why the materials, and building in general, are “bird-friendly.” This includes a material list and supporting data.
  • A completed Bird Collision Threat Rating spreadsheet.
  • Plan(s) and/or elevation(s) depicting the location of all materials and shading/screening devices used to comply with this credit
  • Applicable specification details on all materials and shading/screening devices used to comply with this credit

Interior Lighting

Option 1:

  • A copy of the building operations guidelines text that stipulates that all interior lighting must be turned off by the appropriate nighttime personnel after hours when the space is unoccupied.

Option 2:

  • Narrative, and drawings showing control locations, describing the lighting controls used on the interior lighting, the sequence of operation and how these controls comply with this credit and section 9 of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010

Exterior Lighting

Option 1:

  • A photometric report of those luminaires demonstrating that no light is emitted above 90 degrees from straight down in their final installed position(s).
  • Narrative, and drawings showing control locations, describing the lighting controls used on the exterior lighting, the sequence of operation and how these controls comply with this credit.

Option 2:

  • All submittals required for the LEED for New Construction SS Credit, Light Pollution Reduction.

Post-Construction Monitoring Plan
ALL PROJECTS

  • A copy of the post-construction monitoring plan
AND

EBOM PROJECTS

  • Provide records of all collisions during the Performance Period. Include the location, date, and approximate time of day for each collision.
  • Plan(s) and/or elevation(s) depicting the location of all temporary and permanent materials and shading/screening devices used to retrofit the building façade in response to the results of the monitoring plan.
  • Applicable specification details on all temporary and permanent materials and shading/screening devices used to retrofit the building façade in response to the results of the monitoring plan.
Important notes:

Eligibility: The pilot ACP is only available to projects from ENERGY STAR-eligible building types.

Project limit: There is a 500 project cap on participation in this pilot ACP.

Certification level cap: projects using this pilot ACP may not earn any points under EAc1 and are not able to achieve LEED certification beyond the Certified level.

Establishment

Conduct an analysis to identify any high priority retrofit needs and establish a shortterm plan that addresses the needs identified.

Performance

Demonstrate energy efficiency improvement, measured by source energy use intensity (EUI), of at least 20%, normalized for climate and building use. The percent reduction is determined by the project building’s energy reduction over the most recent 12 months, and data from three contiguous years of the previous five represents the baseline period. Buildings without four consecutive years of energy data are ineligible.

Credit Specific: The submittals for this pilot prerequisite may be downloaded here.

Establishment:

Provide a copy of the short-term plan that addresses the retrofit needs identified in the analysis.

Performance:
  1. Provide performance period dates; must be at least 12 consecutive months.
  2. Provide baseline period dates.
  3. Confirm that the baseline and performance period fall within the previous 5 years.
  4. Confirm project building square footage.
  5. Confirm Energy meter(s) that measured the entire energy use of the project building have been in place from the start of the baseline period, and that this was the data used to establish the project building's energy efficiency performance.
  6. Choose one of the following options for providing energy consumption data to USGBC:

    Option 1: The project team is sharing energy consumption data with USGBC through EPA’s ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, and understands that USGBC will check for the following information:

    • The project building’s baseline source energy use intensity (as provided by ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool) (kBTU/sf)

    • The project building’s performance period source energy use intensity (as provided by ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool) (kBTU/sf)
    • Project building’s ENERGY STAR rating
    • Use of the “Set Energy Performance Target” tool in Portfolio Manager and set a target, and the estimated target reduction (%).
    • If any energy performance improvements have been made during the performance period, the record of improvements in the “Track Energy Performance Improvements” tool in Portfolio Manager.

    Select how the project will share data with USGBC:

    • Verify that the project team has provided Master Account access to USGBC-LEEDPerformanceReporting.
    • OR

    • [This option is not yet available]
      Verify that the project team has authorized USGBC as their Energy Service Provider (ESP) for Automated Benchmarking Service (ABS) Note: Authorizing USGBC as an ESP will streamline how you share energy data with USGBC. When you authorize USGBC as an ESP to your ENERGY STAR portfolio manager account, you will be allowing USGBC to automatically and regularly pull your energy and water data (as long as it is maintained in Portfolio Manager), and will not have to send USGBC data in another format.

    OR
    Option 2: The project is sharing energy consumption data with USGBC by providing copies of the Portfolio Manager Web Pages that confirm :

    The project building’s baseline source energy use intensity (as provided by ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool) (kBTU/sf)

    • The project building’s performance period source energy use intensity (as provided by ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool) (kBTU/sf)
    • Project building’s ENERGY STAR rating
    • Use of the “Set Energy Performance Target” tool in Portfolio Manager and set a target, and the estimated target reduction (%).
    • If any energy performance improvements have been made during the performance period, the record of improvements in the “Track Energy Performance
      Improvements” tool in Portfolio Manager.
    Background information

    Allowing owners who employ energy management best practices in their buildings to receive a LEED rating by reducing their energy consumption by 20% provides new opportunities for USGBC. This type of leadership can now be rewarded within LEED and supported by USGBC’s performance programs. Annual performance reports and recertification are perfectly suited for these types of buildings.

    Buildings entering LEED EB: O&M through this performance option are required to show continuous improvement through the LEED Recertification program. The recertification program allows USGBC to ensure that all buildings in LEED are maintaining leadership standards. Buildings addressed by this compliance path have the most to gain and will find the most value in maintaining their LEED certification; without them, the LEED Recertification Program will not be a strong market changing instrument.

    If we want LEED to drive significant reductions in energy use we are going to need the majority of buildings to reduce their energy use by 20% or more.

    Changes
    • 5/15/2012:
      Updated documentation form link and reformatted documentation requirement language.
    • 8/1/2013:
      Updated eligible project types to align with ENERGY STAR revisions

    Reduce the energy load for all diagnostic imaging equipment (x-rays, MRIs, etc), sterilization, and point- of-use electric steam generators installed in the project, (but excluding other types of medical equipment):

    • At least 50%, by rated power, of medical equipment purchased for the project shall be among the 25th percentile of lowest energy consumers for that class of equipment. Equipment shall be compared based on their continuous (or “standby”) mode electrical energy consumption.

    Obtain structural engineer verification that the design and constructing of the building is capable of supporting planned photovoltaic technologies on the roof.

    AND

    Enter into a rooftop lease agreement committing to provide renewable, solar energy for distributed generation1that meets the following requirements:

    Solar facility capacity Points
    250 kW  
    500 kW  
    1,000 kW  

    The agreement must specify an expected commercial operation date for the solar facility that is within 18 months of building construction completion.

    Capacity of the solar facility shall be determined by summing the photovoltaic module (PV) power listed on the nameplates of the PV modules in units of watt and then dividing by 1,000 to convert to kilowatt (kW).

    The PV module power ratings are for Standard Test Conditions (STC) of 1000 W/sq. meters solar irradiance and 25oC PV module temperature.

    While projects may use electricity from the solar facility, the facility cannot count towards the achievement of EAc2: On-site Renewable Energy (BD&C rating systems) and EAc4 On-site and Off-site Renewable Energy (O&M rating systems).

    The building is prohibited from receiving or claiming ownership of environmental attributes generated by the on-site renewable energy facility. Environmental attributes shall include, without limitation, any and all carbon credits, renewable energy credits, emissions reductions, reporting rights, offsets and allowances attributable to the electric energy produced by the solar facility.

    1Distributed generation is the use of small-scale power generation technologies located close to the load being served. These systems reduce the amount of energy lost in transmitting electricity because the electricity is generated very near where it is used. Distributed generation systems are typically smaller than 10,000 kW. For purposes of this credit, distributed generation systems must deliver power to the utility distribution grid rather than to an individual building.
    2As a pilot credit, project teams will earn one point regardless of the threshold achieved. USGBC is indicating multiple thresholds to display the credit’s intended structure.

    Design and locate exterior noise sources1 for new and majorly renovated buildings so that project noise levels at the nearest property line or public right of way are a minimum of 5 dBA below the existing ambient noise levels without the project, and no more than 60 dBA. Ambient sound level shall be measured as a Day-Night Equivalent Level (Ldn), and future sound levels from the project shall be calculated. Project building equipment noise shall be evaluated with respect to existing levels, and mitigated as required to not exceed the levels set out above. Emergency equipment (e.g. generators) do not need to meet these noise requirements, however, an operations plan must be included to describe their schedule for periodic testing.

    1Noise sources may include building equipment mounted on the rooftop, inside building but exterior venting, or located at grade), transformers, traffic associated with the building, and other sources.

    Beginning prior to construction but after trades have been hired for the project, hold a total of 8 hours of field and/or classroom training focusing on the green aspects of the project, including each relevant LEED for Homes prerequisite, and the expectations for ensuring certification. Special focus should be on where trades have traditionally struggled in the past to meet the higher requirements of a green building. Include at least the following trades in the training:

    • Plumbing
    • Mechanical systems
    • Insulation
    • Framing
    • Air Sealing

    The builder’s site supervisor must be present for the entirety of the training(s), so they can better perform their quality control duties on the relevant LEED and green building best practice items.

    Each trade is not required to be in the training for 8 hours, but the site supervisor must be there for the entirety of the training. The requirement is for a total of 8 hours of training over any number of days for the cumulative trades training for the building project.

    LEED for Homes Review Process

    LEED for Homes projects: When complete, submit documentation here.

    Credit Specific:

    Submit documentation with dates, trainers, duration, and which trades were present.

    Additional Questions
    • Was the trades training useful?
    • What was the primary focus of the trades training: introduction to LEED, green building best practices, or other?
    Background Information

    Training the primary installation contractors before construction starts on the increased expectations and requirements of a LEED building should improve the quality of their installation, and the subsequent performance of the building.

    Changes
    • Changes made 1/11/2011:
      Clarified that the training can be in field or classroom
      Added “framing” to the list of trades to include
      Added “The general contractor is strongly encouraged to be in attendance of these trainings.”
    • Changes made 2/4/2011:
      Clarified that credit is available to 2008 mid-rise projects, but not to 2011 mid-rise projects, because it is a credit in the core mid-rise rating system.

    Design and build the project to achieve all of the following features:

    • A principal functional entry on the front façade faces a public space, such as a street,1square, park, paseo,2 or plaza, but not a parking lot, and is connected to sidewalks or equivalent provisions for walking.
      • A historic building3is exempt if its historic principal functional entry does not face a public space and/or is not connected to sidewalks or equivalent provisions for walking, and the building cannot be modified without altering key historic features of the building.
      • To qualify as a public space, a square, park, or plaza must be at least 50 feet (15 meters) wide at a point perpendicular to the functional entry.
    • All street frontages have a minimum building-height-to-street centerline ratio of 1:1.5 (i.e. a minimum of 1 foot [300 millimeters] of building height for every 1.5 feet [450 millimeters] width from street centerline to building façade).
      • Non-motorized rights-of-way may be counted toward the requirement, but frontages facing those rights-of-way must have a minimum 1:0.5 ratio of building height to street width.
      • Building height is measured to eaves or the top of the roof for a flat-roof structure, and street centerline is measured from the façade. For building frontages with multiple heights or widths, use average heights or widths weighted by each segment’s linear share of the total block length.
      • Alleys4and driveways are excluded from these calculations.
      • A historic building is exempt from these requirements if its dimensions do not meet the ratio requirements.
    • Any new off-street parking lots are located at the side or rear of the building.
    • Continuous sidewalks or equivalent all-weather route for walking on the project site serve all building entrances and connect them with public sidewalks. Newly constructed sidewalks must be at least 8 feet (2.5 meters) wide on retail or mixed-use blocks and at least 4 feet (1.2 meters) wide on all other blocks. Equivalent provisions for walking include woonerfs5and all-weather-surface footpaths. Alleys and driveways are excluded from these calculations.
    • No more than 20% of the street frontage of the project is faced directly by garage and service bay openings. Alley access is used instead, if available.
    • If a façade extends along a sidewalk, no more than 40% of its length or 50 feet(15 meters), whichever is less, is blank (without doors or windows).
    • At-grade crossings with driveways account for no more than 10% of the length of sidewalks within the project
    • Street trees are provided between the vehicle travel way and walkway at intervals of no more than 450 feet (15 meters) (The width of driveways, utility
      vaults and alleyways intersecting the vehicle travel way or walkway may be excluded from these calculations).

    • 1a dedicated right-of-way that can accommodate one or more modes of travel, excluding alleys and paseos. A street is suitable for primary entrances and provides access to the front and/or sides of buildings and lots. A street may be privately owned as long as it is deeded in perpetuity for general public use. A street must be an addressable thoroughfare (for mail purposes) under the standards of the applicable regulating authority.
    • 2a publicly accessible pedestrian path, at least 4 feet wide and no more than 12 feet wide, that provides shortcuts between buildings and through the block, connecting street frontages to rear parking areas, midblock courtyards, alleys, or other streets. A paseo may be roofed for up to 50% of its length and may be privately owned or publicly dedicated.
    • 3a building or structure listed or determined to be eligible as a historic structure or building or structure or as a contributing building or structure in a designated historic district, due to its historic, architectural, engineering, archeological, or cultural significance. The building or structure must be designated as historic by a local historic preservation review board or similar body, be listed in a state register of historic places, be listed in the National Register of Historic Places, or have been determined eligible for listing in the National Register.
    • 4a publicly accessible right-of-way, generally located midblock, that can accommodate slow-speed motor vehicles, as well as bicycles and pedestrians. An alley provides access to the side or rear of abutting properties for loading, parking, and other service functions, minimizing the need for these functions to be located along streets. It may be publicly dedicated or privately owned and deeded in perpetuity for general public use.
    • 5a street, also known as a home zone, shared zone, or living street, where pedestrians have priority over vehicles and the posted speed limit is no greater than 10 miles per hour. Physical elements within the roadway, such as shared surfaces, plantings, street furniture, parking, and play areas, slow traffic and invite pedestrians to use the entire right-of-way.

    Changes:
    • Changes made based on feedback (03/15/2013):
      wording modifications & measurement clarifications
      public space qualification language added

    Meet uplight and light trespass requirements, using either the backlight-uplight-glare (BUG) method (Option 1) or the calculation method (Option 2). Projects may use different options for uplight and light trespass.

    Meet these requirements for all exterior luminaires located inside the project boundary (except those listed under “Exemptions”), based on the following:

    • the photometric characteristics of each luminaire when mounted in the same orientation and tilt as specified in the project design; and
    • the lighting zone of the project property (at the time construction begins). Classify the project under one lighting zone using the lighting zones definitions provided in the Illuminating Engineering Society and International Dark Sky Association (IES/IDA) Model Lighting Ordinance (MLO) User Guide.

    Additionally, meet the internally illuminated signage requirement.

    Uplight
    Option 1. BUG rating method

    Do not exceed the following luminaire uplight ratings, based on the specific light source installed in the luminaire, as defined in IES TM-15-11, Addendum A.

    Table 1. maximum uplight ratings for luminaires

    MLO lighting zone Luminaire uplight rating
    LZ0 U0
    LZ1 U1
    LZ2 U2
    LZ3 U3
    LZ4 U4

    OR
    Option 2. calculation method

    Do not exceed the following percentages of total lumens emitted above horizontal.

    Table 2. maximum percentage of total lumens emitted above horizontal, by lighting zone

    MLO lighting zone Maximum allowed percentage of total luminaire lumens emitted above horizontal
    LZ0 0%
    LZ1 0%
    LZ2 1.5%
    LZ3 3%
    LZ4 6%

    AND
    Light trespass
    Option 1. BUG rating method

    Do not exceed the following luminaire backlight and glare ratings (based on the specific light source installed in the luminaire), as defined in IES TM-15-11, Addendum A, based on the mounting location and distance from the lighting boundary.

    Table 3. maximum backlight and glare ratings

      MLO lighting zone
    Luminaire mounting LZ0 LZ1 LZ2 LZ3 LZ4
      Allowed backlight ratings
    > 2 mounting heights from lighting boundary B1 B3 B4 B5 B5
    1 to 2 mounting heights from lighting boundary and properly oriented B1 B2 B3 B4 B4
    0.5 to 1 mounting height to lighting boundary and properly oriented B0 B1 B2 B3 B3
    < 0.5 mounting height to lighting boundary and properly oriented B0 B0 B0 B1 B2
      Allowed glare ratings
    Building-mounted > 2 mounting heights from any lighting boundary G0 G1 G2 G3 G4
    Building-mounted 1–2 mounting heights from any lighting boundary G0 G0 G1 G1 G2
    Building-mounted 0.5 to 1 mounting heights from any lighting boundary G0 G0 G0 G1 G1
    Building-mounted < 0.5 mounting heights from any lighting boundary G0 G0 G0 G0 G1
    All other luminaires G0 G1 G2 G3 G4

    The lighting boundary is located at the property lines of the property, or properties, that the LEED project occupies. The lighting boundary can be modified under the following conditions:

    • When the property line abuts a public area that includes, but is not limited to, a walkway, bikeway, plaza, or parking lot, the lighting boundary may be moved to 5 feet (1.5 meters) beyond the property line.
    • When the property line abuts a public street, alley, or transit corridor, the lighting boundary may be moved to the center line of that street, alley, or corridor.
    • When there are additional properties owned by the same entity that are contiguous to the property, or properties, that the LEED project is within and have the same or higher MLO lighting zone designation as the LEED project, the lighting boundary may be expanded to include those properties.

    Orient all luminaires less than two mounting heights from the lighting boundary such that the backlight points toward the nearest lighting boundary line. Building-mounted luminaires with the backlight oriented toward the building are exempt from the backlight rating requirement.

    OR
    Option 2. calculation method

    Do not exceed the following vertical illuminances at the lighting boundary (use the definition of lighting boundary in Option 1). Calculation points may be no more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) apart. Vertical illuminances must be calculated on vertical planes running parallel to the lighting boundary, with the normal to each plane oriented toward the property and perpendicular to the lighting boundary, extending from grade level to 33 feet (10 meters) above the height of the highest luminaire.

    Table 4. maximum vertical illuminance at lighting boundary, by lighting zone

    MLO lighting zone Vertical illuminance
    LZ0 0.05 fc (0.5 lux)
    LZ1 0.05 fc (0.5 lux)
    LZ2 0.10 fc (1 lux)
    LZ3 0.20 fc (2 lux)
    LZ4 0.60 fc (6 lux)

    AND

    Internally illuminated exterior signage

    Do not exceed a luminance of 200 cd/m2 (nits) during nighttime hours and 2000 cd/m2 (nits) during daytime hours.

    Exemptions from uplight and light trespass requirements

    The following exterior lighting is exempt from the requirements, provided it is controlled separately from the nonexempt lighting:

    • specialized signal, directional, and marker lighting for transportation;
    • lighting that is used solely for façade and landscape lighting in MLO lighting zones 3 and 4, and is automatically turned off from midnight until 6 a.m.;
    • lighting for theatrical purposes for stage, film, and video performances;
    • government-mandated roadway lighting;
    • hospital emergency departments, including associated helipads;
    • lighting for the national flag in MLO lighting zones 2, 3, or 4; and
    • internally illuminated signage.
    Credit specific
    Building Design & Construction

    Exterior Lighting – provide the following:

    • A site plan showing all sign locations and exterior light fixtures with designations and an associated fixture schedule with brief descriptions including lamp information for all fixtures
    • A description with drawings and/or images of the site and all immediately adjacent properties, documenting a lighting zone for each of these. Any lighting zone
      4 designations should include a document from the local zoning authority showing that they have authorized that zone designation for that site.
    • A list of all exempt exterior luminaires and which exemption they qualify under.
    • Signage: Narrative and drawings describing the luminance levels of the signs during hours of darkness and hours of daylight. Daylight hours are between 30 minutes after sunrise and 30 minutes before sunset. Nighttime hours are between 30 minutes after sunset and 30 minutes before sunrise.
      • Uplight
        Option 1 BUG Rating Method:

        • The lighting zone designation used for this option
        • A lighting schedule documenting the three-dimensional orientation (plan/ elevation) of each non-exempt exterior fixture and it’s U-Rating in that orientation (identical luminaires in the same orientation may be grouped).

        Option 2 Calculation Method:

        • The lighting zone designation used for this option
        • A spreadsheet showing the following for each non-exempt luminaire (including summations where appropriate): (identical luminaires in the same orientation may be grouped)
          1. Catalog #
          2. Quantity of this luminaire
          3. The three dimensional orientation of the luminaire (plan/ elevation)
          4. The lumens emitted by the luminaire in that orientation
          5. The lumens emitted by the luminaire in that orientation above the horizon
        • A summation calculation showing compliance based on the data presented above.

        Light Trespass
        Option 1 BUG Rating Method:

        • The lighting zone designation used for this option
        • Where appropriate, a narrative justifying extending the lighting boundary line past the property line in accordance with the credit requirements.
        • a spreadsheet showing the following for each non-exempt luminaire: (identical luminaires in the same orientation may be grouped)
          1. Catalog #
          2. The three dimensional orientation of the luminaire (plan/ elevation)
          3. The orientation of the luminaire relative to the nearest lighting boundary line
          4. The backlight and glare ratings of the luminaire in the defined position
          5. An statement of compliance

        Option 2 Calculation Method:
        A point-by-point calculation showing initial vertical illuminances. Each vertical plane shall include:

        • The maximum vertical illuminance encountered
        • The lighting zone for this plane
        • A statement of compliance
        • Multitenant Complex Projects:
          Include a narrative that describes:

          • How the safety/security issues, comfort, and economic activity were addressed and enhanced,
          • The shared exterior lighting amenities,
          • How light pollution and energy consumption was minimized, and
          • How specific projects fit into the overall design.
          Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

          Interior Lighting- provide the following:

          • Narrative and drawings showing control locations, describing the lighting controls used on the interior lighting, the sequence of operation, and how these controls comply with this credit and section 9 of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010.

          Exterior Lighting

          Option 1:

          • A luminaire schedule identifying those luminaires where the sum of the mean lamp lumens exceeds 2,500
          • A photometric report of those luminaires demonstrating that no light is emitted above 90 degrees from straight down in their final installed position(s).

          Option 2:

          • Provide proof that the project complies with NC, CS, Schools, Retail, Healthcare above.

          Option 3:

          • A plan showing the location of the measurement points used to measure the night illumination levels.
          • A description of the measurement results.
    Additional questions
    1. Were you able to understand and comply with the credit language as written?
    2. Were there barriers to implementing the strategies used under this credit?
    3. Do the criteria associated with quality exterior lighting align with your project’s productivity, safety, and quality needs?
    Changes:

    Establishment

    Option 1. Fixture Shielding

    Shield all exterior fixtures (where the sum of the mean lamp lumens for that fixture exceeds 2,500) such that the installed fixtures do not directly emit any light at a vertical angle more than 90 degrees from straight down.

    OR

    Option 2. BD&C Requirements

    If the project is certified under LEED for New Construction, Schools, demonstrate that the project complies with the exterior lighting requirements of the most recent LEED for New Construction SS Credit Light Pollution Reduction.

    If the project is certified under LEED for Core & Shell and 75% of the floor area is LEED for Commercial Interiors, demonstrate that the project complies with the exterior lighting requirements of the most recent requirements for both rating systems.

    Option 2. Perimeter Measurements

    Measure the night illumination levels at regularly spaced points on the project boundary, taking the measurements with the building’s exterior and site lights both on and off. At least eight measurements are required, at a maximum spacing of 100 feet (30 meters) apart. The illumination level measured with the lights on must not be more than 20% above the level measured with the lights off.

    Performance

    None.

    Credit specific
    Building Design & Construction

    Exterior Lighting – provide the following:

    • A site plan showing all sign locations and exterior light fixtures with designations and an associated fixture schedule with brief descriptions including lamp information for all fixtures
    • A description with drawings and/or images of the site and all immediately adjacent properties, documenting a lighting zone for each of these. Any lighting zone
      4 designations should include a document from the local zoning authority showing that they have authorized that zone designation for that site.
    • A list of all exempt exterior luminaires and which exemption they qualify under.
    • Signage: Narrative and drawings describing the luminance levels of the signs during hours of darkness and hours of daylight. Daylight hours are between 30 minutes after sunrise and 30 minutes before sunset. Nighttime hours are between 30 minutes after sunset and 30 minutes before sunrise.
      • Uplight
        Option 1 BUG Rating Method:

        • The lighting zone designation used for this option
        • A lighting schedule documenting the three-dimensional orientation (plan/ elevation) of each non-exempt exterior fixture and it’s U-Rating in that orientation (identical luminaires in the same orientation may be grouped).

        Option 2 Calculation Method:

        • The lighting zone designation used for this option
        • A spreadsheet showing the following for each non-exempt luminaire (including summations where appropriate): (identical luminaires in the same orientation may be grouped)
          1. Catalog #
          2. Quantity of this luminaire
          3. The three dimensional orientation of the luminaire (plan/ elevation)
          4. The lumens emitted by the luminaire in that orientation
          5. The lumens emitted by the luminaire in that orientation above the horizon
        • A summation calculation showing compliance based on the data presented above.

        Light Trespass
        Option 1 BUG Rating Method:

        • The lighting zone designation used for this option
        • Where appropriate, a narrative justifying extending the lighting boundary line past the property line in accordance with the credit requirements.
        • a spreadsheet showing the following for each non-exempt luminaire: (identical luminaires in the same orientation may be grouped)
          1. Catalog #
          2. The three dimensional orientation of the luminaire (plan/ elevation)
          3. The orientation of the luminaire relative to the nearest lighting boundary line
          4. The backlight and glare ratings of the luminaire in the defined position
          5. An statement of compliance

        Option 2 Calculation Method:
        A point-by-point calculation showing initial vertical illuminances. Each vertical plane shall include:

        • The maximum vertical illuminance encountered
        • The lighting zone for this plane
        • A statement of compliance
        • Multitenant Complex Projects:
          Include a narrative that describes:

          • How the safety/security issues, comfort, and economic activity were addressed and enhanced,
          • The shared exterior lighting amenities,
          • How light pollution and energy consumption was minimized, and
          • How specific projects fit into the overall design.
          Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance

          Interior Lighting- provide the following:

          • Narrative and drawings showing control locations, describing the lighting controls used on the interior lighting, the sequence of operation, and how these controls comply with this credit and section 9 of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010.

          Exterior Lighting

          Option 1:

          • A luminaire schedule identifying those luminaires where the sum of the mean lamp lumens exceeds 2,500
          • A photometric report of those luminaires demonstrating that no light is emitted above 90 degrees from straight down in their final installed position(s).

          Option 2:

          • Provide proof that the project complies with NC, CS, Schools, Retail, Healthcare above.

          Option 3:

          • A plan showing the location of the measurement points used to measure the night illumination levels.
          • A description of the measurement results.
    Additional questions
    1. Were you able to understand and comply with the credit language as written?
    2. Were there barriers to implementing the strategies used under this credit?
    3. Do the criteria associated with quality exterior lighting align with your project’s productivity, safety, and quality needs?
    Changes:

    * This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

    Option 1. Percentile of rainfall events
    Path 1. 95th percentile (2 points except Healthcare, 1 point Healthcare)

    In a manner best replicating natural site hydrology processes, manage on site the runoff from the developed site for the 95th percentile of regional or local rainfall events using low-impact development (LID) and green infrastructure.

    Use daily rainfall data and the methodology in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for Federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act to determine the 95th percentile amount.

    OR
    Path 2. 98th percentile (3 points except Healthcare, 2 points Healthcare)

    Achieve Path 1 but for the 98th percentile of regional or local rainfall events, using LID and green infrastructure.

    OR
    Path 3. Zero lot line projects only – 85th Percentile (3 points except Healthcare, 2 points Healthcare))

    The following requirement applies to zero lot line projects in urban areas with a minimum density of 1.5 FAR. In a manner best replicating natural site hydrology processes, manage on site the runoff from the developed site for the 85th percentile of regional or local rainfall events, using LID and green infrastructure.

    OR

    Option 2. Natural land cover conditions (3 points except Healthcare, 2 points Healthcare)

    Manage on site the annual increase in runoff volume from the natural land cover condition to the postdeveloped condition.

    Path 1.

    Achieve Option 1 and manage on site the annual increase in runoff volume from the natural land cover condition to the postdeveloped condition.

    Path 2.

    Achieve Option 1 but for the 98th percentile of regional or local rainfall events, using LID and green infrastructure.

    Zero lot line projects only (3 points)

    The following requirement applies to zero lot line projects in urban areas with a minimum density of 1.5 FAR. In a manner best replicating natural site hydrology processes, manage on site the runoff from the developed site for the 85th percentile of regional or local rainfall events, using LID and green infrastructure.

    Projects that are part of a multitenant complex only
    The credit requirements may be met using a coordinated approach affecting the defined project site that is within the master plan boundary. Distributed techniques based on a watershed approach are then required.

    Credit specific

    Option 1:

    • Provide a narrative describing the proposed practices to be implemented on the project site and what qualifies these strategies as LID or green infrastructure techniques that best replicate natural site hydrology processes.
    • Provide any applicable specifications, drawings, and storage and infiltration calculations of the LID practices utilized on site.
    • Provide calculations showing the 95th percentile regional or local rainfall event amount and how the runoff is managed onsite by these practices.

    Option 2 – Path 1:
    In addition to the submittals listed in Option 1, provide any applicable specifications, drawings, and water balance calculations describing natural site hydrology and post-development partitioning of annual rainfall volumes. Natural site hydrology conditions can be determined using a combination of pre-settlement vegetation maps and soil maps. Where detailed pre-settlement vegetation maps do not exist, typical land cover for the project’s EPA Level IV Ecoregion can be used.

    Option 2 – Path 2:
    Provide all submittals listed in Option 1 for the 98th percentile regional or local rainfall event.

    Zero Lot Line Projects:

    • Provide all submittals listed above, but for the 85th percentile threshold.
    • Provide density calculations or density information from the municipality in which the project is located.

    Retail NC Projects:

    • Provide all submittals listed above.
    • Provide a narrative describing the distributed techniques and watershed approach, if used.
    Additional questions:
    1. The goal is to replicate the natural hydrology and water balance of the site. What obstacles make this difficult? Obstacles may or may not be specific to the proposed credit requirements.
    2. What climate data source is most applicable for your area?
    Changes:
    • 1/15/2013: update with SSc4 from LEED v4 draft

      • BD+C: wording changes, the Stormwater Calculator methodology was removed
      • EBOM: Revised requirements to allow for rwm practices currently in place on the EBOM project, and to make the credit more performance-based
    Establishment

    Implement at least two of the following strategies to reduce the annual volume of rainwater runoff from the existing site’s baseline condition:

    • Use Low Impact Development (LID) practices to capture and treat water from 25% of the impervious surfaces from 1.2” (30 millimeters) of rainfall;
    • Disconnect 40% of existing directly connected impervious surfaces and redirect to pervious areas;
    • Rainwater collection system capturing and reusing 25% of the runoff from impervious surfaces;
    • Rainwater filtering system to treat water prior to release into public storm drain systems or drainage easements;
    • Reconnect impervious areas to existing green infrastructure systems.

    Establish an annual inspection program of all rainwater management facilities to confirm continued performance.

    Performance

    Employ the annual inspection program of all rainwater management facilities to confirm continued performance. Maintain documentation of inspection, including identification of areas of erosion, maintenance needs, and repairs. Perform all routine required maintenance, necessary repairs or stabilization within 60 days of inspection.

    Changes:
    • 1/15/2013: update with SSc4 from LEED v4 draft

      • BD+C: wording changes, the Stormwater Calculator methodology was removed
      • EBOM: Revised requirements to allow for rwm practices currently in place on the EBOM project, and to make the credit more performance-based

    Complete and document a site survey/assessment that includes the following information:

    • Topography: Contour mapping, unique topographic features, slope stability risks;
    • Hydrology: 100-year floodplain, delineated wetlands, lakes, streams, shorelines, rain/storm water collection/reuse opportunities, TR-551 initial water storage capacity of the site, or local equivalent outside the U.S.;
    • Climate: Solar exposure, heat island effect potential, and seasonal sun angles, prevailing winds, monthly precipitation and temperature ranges;
    • Vegetation: Primary vegetation types, greenfield area, significant tree mapping, threatened or endangered species, unique habitat, invasive plants;
    • Soils: NRCS soils delineation2, USDA prime farmland3, healthy soils, previous development disturbed soils;
    • Human Use: Views, adjacent transportation infrastructure, adjacent properties,existing recycle/reuse of potential construction materials;
    • Human Health Impacts: proximity of vulnerable populations, adjacent physical activity opportunities, proximity to large sources of air pollution.

    The survey/assessment should demonstrate the relationships between the site features/ topics listed above and how these features influenced the project design OR reasons for not addressing topics.

    1 TR-55 (Technical Release 55) is an approach to hydrology that includes many techniques used to model watersheds including procedures to calculate storm runoff volume, peak rate of discharge, hydrographs, and storage volumes (USDA Soil Conservation Service).

    2 A NRCS soils delineation is a soil survey developed by the Natural Resources Conservation Service that shows the boundaries of different soil types and special soil features on the site.

    3 USDA prime farmland is defined by the NRCS as land that has the best combination of physical and chemical characteristics for producing food, feed, forage, fiber, and oilseed crops and that is available for these uses.

    Credit specific

    Submit the completed Site Assessment Worksheet with relevant project information (both narrative descriptions and maps, as applicable). Include additional topics not listed, if any, and provide reasons for not addressing certain topics. The Site Assessment submittals should clearly demonstrate how the site features informed the choice of site as well as the ongoing design and construction of the project. The Site Assessment Worksheet can be found under Resources.

    Additional questions
    1. To what extent does your firm and/or your project teams already conduct site assessments that include this information?
    2. The goal of this credit is to assess site conditions prior to design in order to evaluate sustainable options and inform related decisions about site and building design. Do you believe that these requirements achieve this intent? Why or why not?
    3. Did you encounter difficulties in gathering the information for the site assessment? If so, in what ways?
    Changes from last version:
    • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
      Incorporated global language into the requirements
      Added user-generated pilot credit recommendations, including:
      heat island effect potential
      adjacent properties
      assessment of potential human health impacts
      Updated Site Assessment Worksheet – worksheet for pre-March 2012 projects can be found under resources
    • 11/15/2013:
      Updated Site Assessment Worksheet with LEED v4 final worksheet

    Establishment

    Develop a five-year site improvement plan that includes the following:

    • documentation of existing site conditions;
    • site improvement objectives;
    • performance standards to evaluate ongoing progress; and
    • monitoring protocols.

    The improvement plan must address the following topics.

    • Hydrology. Protection and improvement of water bodies on-site, rainwater management and reuse opportunities, potable water-use reduction.
    • Vegetation. Documentation of existing vegetation on-site, turf area reduction, management of native and invasive plants, protection of threatened, endangered or unique species.
    • Soils. Documentation of general soil structure, preservation of healthy soils, remediation of compacted soils, identification of previously disturbed area.

    The plan must be developed with professionals trained and experienced in the above disciplines.

    Performance

    Show that at least 5% of the site is vegetated. Implement all no-cost and low-cost measures. Develop a new improvement plan and implement all new no-cost and low-cost measures every five years.

    Credit specific:

    Establishment
    Provide the following:

    1. A copy of the Site Improvement Plan addressing the areas listed in the requirements. If an area is not specifically addressed, explain the reason(s) why.
    2. A drawing of the existing site conditions
    3. Calculations showing compliance with the 5% threshold
    4. A list of professionals consulted for the development of this plan

    Performance
    Provide the following:

    1. A list of all no-cost and low-cost measures implemented
    2. Every 5 years: the items listed above under Establishment
    Additional questions:
    1. The goal of this credit is to improve upon existing site conditions and support high-performance operations by evaluating sustainable site management options. Do you believe that these requirements achieve this intent? Why or why not?
    2. Did you encounter difficulties in gathering the information for the improvement plan? If so, in what ways?
    Changes::
    • Changes as a result of 5th Public Comment (01/15/2013):
      Updated with SSc6 EBOM - Wording changes- rewording for clarification
    Option 1. Source reduction

    Reduce wastewater from toilets and urinals by at least 50% from the baseline calculated in WE Prerequisite Fixture & Fitting Water Use Reduction for toilets and urinals only.

    Percent reduction Points
    50% 1
    95% 1 (2nd point not available)

    OR
    Option 2. Reuse

    Reuse building wastewater on site. Use water from approved non-potable sources including:

    • recycled wastewater (on-site or municipally supplied),
    • swimming pool backwash operations,
    • air conditioner condensate,
    • rainwater,
    • cooling tower blow-down water,
    • foundation drain water,
    • steam system condensate,
    • fluid cooler discharge water,
    • food steamer discharge water,
    • combination oven discharge water,
    • industrial process water,
    • fire pump test water
    • municipally supplied treated seawater
    • ice machine condensate

    Reused water must meet the applicable local code, for its intended use (e.g., on-site irrigation, toilet flushing, cooling tower).

    Strategy Points
    Implement wastewater reuse 1
    Reuse at least 90% of wastewater on site 1 (2nd point not available)

    OR
    Option 3. Resource recovery

    Implement resource recovery and reuse of one or both of the following for up to 1 point::

    Resource recovery type Points
    nutrients (nitrogen and/or phosphorous) 1
    organic carbon loading from building occupants 1 (2nd point not available)

    Credit specific

    Option 1:

    • Provide a narrative which includes the type of alternative technology and details about how it will be installed and operated for the project building. Systems that negatively offset the environmental benefits, such as those that have high energy use or high pollution rates will not be accepted.
    • Provide any applicable specifications, drawings, and calculations to show that the system significantly minimizes or eliminates the annual wastewater produced
      from sewage conveyance.
    • Process water reduction (i.e., from food service) may qualify for this credit, however, and additional explanation of the method must be provided.

    Option 2:
    Provide a narrative about the wastewater treatment/reuse system including:

    • whether it meets the local standard wastewater
    • source and reuse location (e.g, building graywater reused as toilet flushing water)
    • approximately what portion of the water type is being reused
    • Provide any applicable specifications or drawings to demonstrate the system design and location.

    Option 3:
    Provide a narrative explaining the resource recovery strategy used including:

    • Type of resource(s) recovered
    • Descriptions and specification on system used
    • Estimated annual quantity recovered
    • Estimated impact on total building resource production (i.e. approximately what percent of the identified resource is recovered).
    Additional questions
    • Did the revisions to this credit make it more achievable for your project? For other projects?
    • Are there strategies that have been used on this or other projects that would be applicable to this credit? Explain.
    Changes:
    • 1/15/2013: removed NSF 350 standard from requirements

    * This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

    For cooling towers and evaporative condensers, conduct a one-time potable water analysis, in order to optimize cooling tower cycles. Measure at least the five control parameters listed in Table 1.

    Table 1. Maximum concentrations for parameters in condenser water

    Parameter Maximum level
    Ca (as CaCO3) 1000 ppm
    Total alkalinity 1000 ppm
    SiO2 100 ppm
    Cl- 250 ppm
    Conductivity 2000 µS/cm

    ppm = parts per million
    µS/cm = micro siemens per centimeter

    Calculate the number of cooling tower cycles by dividing the maximum allowed concentration level of each parameter by the actual concentration level of each parameter found in the potable makeup water. Limit cooling tower cycles to avoid exceeding maximum values for any of these parameters.

    Table 2. Points for cooling tower cycles

    Cooling tower cycles Points
    Maximum number of cycles achieved without exceeding any filtration levels or affecting operation of condenser water system (up to maximum of 10 cycles) 1
    Achieve a minimum 10 cycles by increasing the level of treatment in condenser or make-up water
    OR Achieve the number of cycles for 1 point and use a minimum 20% recycled nonpotable water
    2

    Credit specific

    Provide the following:

    1. A water analysis measuring as a minimum the five control parameters measured in ppm or mg/l.
    2. Narrative describing the water treatment system and the number of cycles which the cooling tower can achieve without exceeding the control parameters. The narrative should also include the predicted acceptable corrosion rates for each pipe material within the condenser water system.
    Additional questions:

    none

    Changes
    • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
      Separate language for EBOM projects to conform with new EBOM rating system structure
      Added Healthcare as an applicable rating system type.
      Clarification of cooling tower analysis process which requires a one time potable water analysis, following by an assessment of the maximum number of cycles appropriate to the project, along with additional measures to improve cooling tower efficiency.
    • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
      Removed CI & Retail CI from applicable rating systems
      Removed equipment requirements from EB:O&M
      Separated EBOM & BD+C submittal requirements to reflect change to EBOM requirements.
    • Changes made for 5th Public Comment (1/15/2013):
      Updated tables to align with 5th Public Comment changes to LEED v4 WEc3.
      Removed additional BD+C documentation requirements that correspond to WEp2 from v4 draft.

    * This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

    Establishment

    For cooling towers and evaporative condensers, conduct a potable water analysis within five years of submission for certification, measuring at least the five control parameters listed in Table 1.

    Table 1. Maximum concentrations for parameters in condenser water

    Parameter Maximum level
    Ca (as CaCO3) 1000 ppm
    Total alkalinity 1000 ppm
    SiO2 100 ppm
    Cl- 250 ppm
    Conductivity 2000 µS/cm

    ppm = parts per million
    µS/cm = micro siemens per centimeter

    Calculate the number of cooling tower cycles by dividing the maximum allowed concentration level of each parameter by the actual concentration level of each parameter found in the potable makeup water. Limit cooling tower cycles to avoid exceeding maximum values for any of these parameters.

    Table 2. Points for cooling tower cycles

    Cooling tower cycles Points (except data centers) Points (data centers)
    Maximum number of cycles achieved without exceeding any filtration levels or affecting operation of condenser water system (up to maximum of 10 cycles) 2 2
    Achieve a minimum 10 cycles by increasing the level of treatment in condenser or make-up water
    OR Achieve the number of cycles for 1 point and use a minimum 20% recycled nonpotable water
    3 4

    Performance

    None

    Credit specific

    Provide the following:

    1. A water analysis measuring as a minimum the five control parameters measured in ppm or mg/l.
    2. Narrative describing the water treatment system and the number of cycles which the cooling tower can achieve without exceeding the control parameters. The narrative should also include the predicted acceptable corrosion rates for each pipe material within the condenser water system.
    Additional questions:

    none

    Changes
    • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
      Separate language for EBOM projects to conform with new EBOM rating system structure
      Added Healthcare as an applicable rating system type.
      Clarification of cooling tower analysis process which requires a one time potable water analysis, following by an assessment of the maximum number of cycles appropriate to the project, along with additional measures to improve cooling tower efficiency.
    • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
      Removed CI & Retail CI from applicable rating systems
      Removed equipment requirements from EB:O&M
      Separated EBOM & BD+C submittal requirements to reflect change to EBOM requirements.
    • Changes made for 5th Public Comment (1/15/2013):
      Updated tables to align with 5th Public Comment changes to LEED v4 WEc3.
      Removed additional BD+C documentation requirements that correspond to WEp2 from v4 draft.

    * This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

    Appliance and process water use

    Install appliances, equipment, and processes within the project scope that meet the requirements listed in the tables below .

    Table 2. Standards for appliances

    Appliance Requirement
    Residential clothes washers ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent
    Commercial clothes washers CEE Tier 3A
    Residential dishwashers (standard and compact) ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent
    Prerinse spray valves ≤ 1.3 gpm (4.9 lpm)
    Ice machine ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent and use either air-cooled or closed-loop cooling, such as chilled or condenser water system

    gpm = gallons per minute
    lpm = liters per minute

    Table 3. Standards for processes

    Process Requirement
    Heat rejection and cooling No once-through cooling with potable water for any equipment or appliances that reject heat
    Cooling towers and evaporative condensers Equip with:
    • makeup water meters
    • conductivity controllers and overflow alarms
    • efficient drift eliminators that reduce drift to maximum of 0.002% of recirculated water volume for counterflow towers and 0.005% of recirculated water flow for cross-flow towers

    Credit specific:

    NC, CS, Schools, Retail NC, CI, Retail CI, Healthcare:

    1. Provide a schedule indicating ALL process water equipment. Indicate which types of equipment that are being installed on the project are applicable to the credit and the quantity of equipment which is to be installed. For Healthcare, Schools, Retail and Hospitality projects, include the items in Tables 3& 4 as well.
    2. Provide a floor plan indicating the location of all process water equipment.
    3. Submit one-line diagrams of all piping systems associated with the referenced equipment, inclusive of design flow rates for both supply and effluent.
    4. Provide approved manufacturer's information (i.e. cut sheets, shop drawings, submittals) for each piece of equipment applicable to this credit, indicating at a minimum
      water usage, capacity of equipment, and energy star rating (if applicable).

    EBOM:
    Provide a copy of the purchasing policy, which must include:

    1. detail on its physical and programmatic scope;
    2. duration of applicability;
    3. responsible parties (by individual name or title);
    4. sustainability goals and objectives;
    5. procedures and strategies for implementation;
    6. specific metrics by which performance will be measured; and
    7. a quality assurance process to evaluate and verify successful implementation of the policy.

    AND
    Provide the following:

    • a log of all existing equipment covered by the credit
    • a maintenance plan and log to ensure that the equipment is being properly maintained (and not leaking)
    • documentation that at least 20% of all installed equipment and 100% of purchases during the performance period meet the requirements.
    Additional questions:
    1. Did your project include any other appliances or process water items that should be included in the credit?
    2. Were you able to find suitable products at a reasonable cost at the flow rates required?
    Changes:
    • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
      Added Healthcare to the applicable rating system types
      Restructured EBOM requirements based on new EBOM structure for LEED 2012 and
      aligned purchasing agreement language with other EBOM purchasing credits.
      Separate submittal requirements for NC vs. EBOM
      Added Ice Machine requirement (ENERGY STAR) originally in the Appliance & Process Water credit from LEED 2012.
      Clarified Discharge Water Temperature Tempering requirement is based on the water leaving the appliance (rather than the tank) to reduce maintenance concerns.
    • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
      Updated requirements based on changes for 3rd public comments.
      Separated Tables 3&4 addressing food service and specialty process water items not usually included in a commercial office building. These requirements only apply to Healthcare, Schools, Retail and Hospitality projects.
      Removed some process and appliance requirements for EBOM
    • Changes made for 5th Public Comment (01/15/2013):
      Updated metrics to align with 5th Public Comment changes to LEED v4
    • Changes made based on feedback (03/15/2013):
      Modified EBOM requirements to include purchasing logs and inventory of current equipment
      Clarified that projects without any applicable equipment are ineligible

    Have in place a Process and Appliance Water Equipment Purchasing policy for the building and site addressing of the products and purchases covered below in Table 1. The policy must cover at least those products purchases within the building and site management’s control.

    Table 1. Minimum performance requirements for water-consuming appliances

    Appliance Requirement
    Residential clothes washers ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent
    Commercial clothes washers CEE Tier 3A
    Residential dishwashers (standard and compact) ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent
    Prerinse spray valves ≤ 1.3 gpm (4.9 lpm)
    Ice machine ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent and use either air-cooled or closed-loop cooling, such as chilled or condenser water system

    gpm = gallons per minute
    lpm = liters per minute

    The policy must include the following:

    • detail on its physical and programmatic scope
    • duration of applicability
    • responsible parties (by individual name or title)
    • sustainability goals and objectives
    • procedures and strategies for implementation
    • specific metrics by which performance will be measured; and
    • a quality assurance process to evaluate and verify successful implementation of the policy

    In addition project teams must provide the following:

    • a log of all existing equipment covered by the credit
    • a maintenance plan and log to ensure that the equipment is being properly maintained (and not leaking)

    At least 20% of all installed equipment and 100% of purchases made during the performance period must meet the requirements. If the building does not include any of this equipment, the credit is not achievable.

    ** Based on current version of Energy Star at time of project registration. Only required for appliances that are eligible for Energy Star under existing Energy Star categories. Energy Star equivalent must meet all current Energy Star testing and performance requirements. Projects (especially non-US projects) may demonstrate equivalency with ENERGY STAR. To use this approach, submit documentation that the appliance complies with all flow and performance requirements outlined by the ENERGY STAR label.

    Credit specific:

    NC, CS, Schools, Retail NC, CI, Retail CI, Healthcare:

    1. Provide a schedule indicating ALL process water equipment. Indicate which types of equipment that are being installed on the project are applicable to the credit and the quantity of equipment which is to be installed. For Healthcare, Schools, Retail and Hospitality projects, include the items in Tables 3& 4 as well.
    2. Provide a floor plan indicating the location of all process water equipment.
    3. Submit one-line diagrams of all piping systems associated with the referenced equipment, inclusive of design flow rates for both supply and effluent.
    4. Provide approved manufacturer's information (i.e. cut sheets, shop drawings, submittals) for each piece of equipment applicable to this credit, indicating at a minimum
      water usage, capacity of equipment, and energy star rating (if applicable).

    EBOM:
    Provide a copy of the purchasing policy, which must include:

    1. detail on its physical and programmatic scope;
    2. duration of applicability;
    3. responsible parties (by individual name or title);
    4. sustainability goals and objectives;
    5. procedures and strategies for implementation;
    6. specific metrics by which performance will be measured; and
    7. a quality assurance process to evaluate and verify successful implementation of the policy.

    AND
    Provide the following:

    • a log of all existing equipment covered by the credit
    • a maintenance plan and log to ensure that the equipment is being properly maintained (and not leaking)
    • documentation that at least 20% of all installed equipment and 100% of purchases during the performance period meet the requirements.
    Additional questions:
    1. Did your project include any other appliances or process water items that should be included in the credit?
    2. Were you able to find suitable products at a reasonable cost at the flow rates required?
    Changes:
    • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
      Added Healthcare to the applicable rating system types
      Restructured EBOM requirements based on new EBOM structure for LEED 2012 and
      aligned purchasing agreement language with other EBOM purchasing credits.
      Separate submittal requirements for NC vs. EBOM
      Added Ice Machine requirement (ENERGY STAR) originally in the Appliance & Process Water credit from LEED 2012.
      Clarified Discharge Water Temperature Tempering requirement is based on the water leaving the appliance (rather than the tank) to reduce maintenance concerns.
    • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
      Updated requirements based on changes for 3rd public comments.
      Separated Tables 3&4 addressing food service and specialty process water items not usually included in a commercial office building. These requirements only apply to Healthcare, Schools, Retail and Hospitality projects.
      Removed some process and appliance requirements for EBOM
    • Changes made for 5th Public Comment (01/15/2013):
      Updated metrics to align with 5th Public Comment changes to LEED v4
    • Changes made based on feedback (03/15/2013):
      Modified EBOM requirements to include purchasing logs and inventory of current equipment
      Clarified that projects without any applicable equipment are ineligible

    Design building and equipment to participate in, or have the ability to participate in, Demand Response programs through load shedding or shifting. On-site electricity generation does not meet the intent of this credit.

    Note: Only 1 point total is available for the Pilot Credit, though both Options are shown to reflect the credit as it appears in the LEED v4 Rating System.

    Case 1: Existing demand response program available

    Participate in an existing Demand Response (DR) program with the following requirements:

    • Have in place a system with the capability for real-time, fully-automated DR based on external initiation by a DR Program Provider.
    • Enroll in a minimum 1-year DR-Participation Amount Contractual Commitment (DR-PACC) with a qualified DR program provider with theintention of multi-year renewal, for 10% or more of the estimated peak electricity demand, or a minimum of 20kW, whichever is greater.
    • Develop a comprehensive plan of how the project will meet the contracted demand reduction commitment during a Demand Response event.
    • Peak demand is determined from EA Credit: Optimize Energy Performance.
    • Include the DR processes in the scope of work for the commissioning authority, including participation in at least one full test of the DR response plan.
    Case 2: Demand response program not yet available

    Provide infrastructure to take advantage of future demand response programs or dynamic/real-time pricing programs. Project team must:

    • Develop a comprehensive plan of how to shed at least 10%, or 20kW, whichever is greater, of building estimated peak electricity demand during a Demand Response event.
    • Contact local utility representative to discuss interest in, and availability for, participation in future DR programs.
    • Peak demand is determined from EA Credit: Optimize Energy Performance.
    • Install interval recording meter with communications and ability for BAS to accept an external price or control signal, such as a data logger, external data recorder, or solid state meter, which can accept pulses.
    • Include the DR processes in the scope of work for the commissioning authority, including participation in at least one full test of the DR response plan.
    Credit specific
    1. Demand Response – Participation Amount Contractual Commitment (DR-PACC)
      (Not Applicable to Option 1, Case 2)
      Submit proof of enrollment in a DR-Participation Amount Contractual Commitment, containing the physical address of the building(s), authorized agents for event notification, utility account numbers associated with each building, terms for earning revenue, terms for revenue sharing, number and duration of events, notification process, monitoring requirements, enrollment periods, minimum size, performance and consequences for non-performance, penalties and renewal options.
      The official evidence of enrollment is the document or other verification issued by the ISO, RTO, or energy provider after the asset is successfully registered in a
      specific Demand Response program.
    2. Demand Response Action Plan
      Submit a comprehensive Action Plan, including:

      • Potential for Demand Response Participation, such as curtailment of peak demand, and the elected Demand Response value, or schedule of values, in
        kWs, to be registered with the DR provider.
      • Event notification process for Demand Response events, such as a phone call, an alarm with countdown clock or a signal to a BAS console, depending on the degree of Demand Response program automation, i.e. manual, semiautomated, or automated.
      • Detailed procedures and responses to execute the Demand Response program measures consistent with the Demand Response Enrollment Contract and the registered Demand Response Participation Amount, including the notification method, specific actions, the order of execution, the load monitoring process and the post event recovery process.
      • Energy Management Team responsible for management of the Demand Response program, and coordination with the Demand Response Program provider, the Facilities Department, and internal Risk Management, including Demand Response event notification and response, revenue settlements, contract administration, assessments, Demand Response action fulfillment, employee awareness training, Demand Response readiness drills, and energy management reporting.
      • Description of end use systems which will be impacted, such as HVAC, or lighting, on a stand-alone, or integrated basis, during participation in Demand
        Response events.
    3. Demand Response Test Report
      (EBOM Only)
      Submit evidence of Demand Response test conducted in compliance with the DR Program Provider's test requirements to verify the building's ability to participate in a DR event. The tests can be performed by the building's facility engineer, a 3rd-party engineer, or other qualified parties, such as an energy services company (ESCO), in conformance with the Program Agreement.
    4. Demand Response Training Program
      Submit a training plan and objectives developed for those employees directly responsible for executing the Demand Response action plan that addresses key activities in implementation of the DR Action Plan, including:

      • Individual assignments
      • Event signals
      • Communications protocols
      • Recovery
      • Reporting
      • Clear status

      For impacted employees and building occupants, provide training on possible impacts of various Demand Response events, such as shutdown of production
      lines, or changes in lighting or heating levels, and how to react and proceed during an event. Measures for personal safety, and proper evacuation, if needed,
      also should be addressed.

    5. Demand Response Program Financial Analysis
      Provide an evaluation of the financial investments required to implement and manage the Demand Response program. Where possible, calculate ROI or
      Payback, especially in those cases where significant infrastructure or personnel investments are made. Carefully evaluate the investments in personnel and
      capital equipment required. Key factors include:

      • Capital Investment for new equipment or system modifications
      • Changes to programming in existing BAS
      • Rebates, Incentives, and Tariffs
      • Projected revenues
      • Energy Efficiency impacts and interactions with Demand Response.

    Design building and equipment to participate in, or have the ability to participate in, Demand Response programs through load shedding or shifting. On-site electricity generation does not meet the intent of this credit.

    Note: Only 1 point total is available for the Pilot Credit, though both Options are shown to reflect the credit as it appears in the 2012 Rating System.

    Case 1: Existing demand response program available

    Participate in an existing Demand Response (DR) program with the following requirements:

    • Have in place a system with the capability for real-time, fully-automated DR based on external initiation by a DR Program Provider.
    • Enroll in a minimum 1-year DR-Participation Amount Contractual Commitment (DR-PACC) with a qualified DR program provider with theintention of multi-year renewal, for 10% or more of the estimated peak electricity demand, or a minimum of 20kW, whichever is greater.
    • Develop a comprehensive plan of how the project will meet the contracted demand reduction commitment during a Demand Response event.
    • Peak Demand is based on electric utility bills.
    • Include the DR processes in the Current Facilities Requirements and Operations and Maintenance Plan.
    • Initiate at least one full test of the DR response plan.
    Case 2: Demand response program not yet available

    Provide infrastructure to take advantage of future demand response programs or dynamic/real-time pricing programs. Project team must:

    • Develop a comprehensive plan of how to shed at least 10%, or 20kW, whichever is greater, of building estimated peak electricity demand during a Demand Response event.
    • Contact local utility representative to discuss interest in, and availability for, participation in future DR programs.
    • Peak Demand is based on electric utility bills.
    • Include the DR processes in the Current Facilities Requirements and Operations and Maintenance Plan.
    • Initiate at least one full test of the DR response plan.

    OR

    Case 3. Permanent load shifting (2 points)

    Implement electrical load shifting measures with the following requirements:

    • Have in place during the performance period a system which permanently transfers electricity demand from peak hours to off-peak hours as defined by the local utility provider.
    • Demonstrate that the facility is successfully reducing peak demand by 10% during the performance period as compared to peak electrical demand by:
      • Identifying all load shifting measures and their intended peak electrical load shift
      • Verifying a corresponding peak electrical load reduction for each measure
      • Verifying a corresponding off-peak electrical load increase for each measure
    • Include the load shifting measures in the current facilities requirements and operations and maintenance plan.
    Credit specific
    1. Demand Response – Participation Amount Contractual Commitment (DR-PACC)
      (Not Applicable to Option 1, Case 2)
      Submit proof of enrollment in a DR-Participation Amount Contractual Commitment, containing the physical address of the building(s), authorized agents for event notification, utility account numbers associated with each building, terms for earning revenue, terms for revenue sharing, number and duration of events, notification process, monitoring requirements, enrollment periods, minimum size, performance and consequences for non-performance, penalties and renewal options.
      The official evidence of enrollment is the document or other verification issued by the ISO, RTO, or energy provider after the asset is successfully registered in a
      specific Demand Response program.
    2. Demand Response Action Plan
      Submit a comprehensive Action Plan, including:

      • Potential for Demand Response Participation, such as curtailment of peak demand, and the elected Demand Response value, or schedule of values, in
        kWs, to be registered with the DR provider.
      • Event notification process for Demand Response events, such as a phone call, an alarm with countdown clock or a signal to a BAS console, depending on the degree of Demand Response program automation, i.e. manual, semiautomated, or automated.
      • Detailed procedures and responses to execute the Demand Response program measures consistent with the Demand Response Enrollment Contract and the registered Demand Response Participation Amount, including the notification method, specific actions, the order of execution, the load monitoring process and the post event recovery process.
      • Energy Management Team responsible for management of the Demand Response program, and coordination with the Demand Response Program provider, the Facilities Department, and internal Risk Management, including Demand Response event notification and response, revenue settlements, contract administration, assessments, Demand Response action fulfillment, employee awareness training, Demand Response readiness drills, and energy management reporting.
      • Description of end use systems which will be impacted, such as HVAC, or lighting, on a stand-alone, or integrated basis, during participation in Demand
        Response events.
    3. Demand Response Test Report
      (EBOM Only)
      Submit evidence of Demand Response test conducted in compliance with the DR Program Provider's test requirements to verify the building's ability to participate in a DR event. The tests can be performed by the building's facility engineer, a 3rd-party engineer, or other qualified parties, such as an energy services company (ESCO), in conformance with the Program Agreement.
    4. Demand Response Training Program
      Submit a training plan and objectives developed for those employees directly responsible for executing the Demand Response action plan that addresses key activities in implementation of the DR Action Plan, including:

      • Individual assignments
      • Event signals
      • Communications protocols
      • Recovery
      • Reporting
      • Clear status

      For impacted employees and building occupants, provide training on possible impacts of various Demand Response events, such as shutdown of production
      lines, or changes in lighting or heating levels, and how to react and proceed during an event. Measures for personal safety, and proper evacuation, if needed,
      also should be addressed.

    5. Demand Response Program Financial Analysis
      Provide an evaluation of the financial investments required to implement and manage the Demand Response program. Where possible, calculate ROI or
      Payback, especially in those cases where significant infrastructure or personnel investments are made. Carefully evaluate the investments in personnel and
      capital equipment required. Key factors include:

      • Capital Investment for new equipment or system modifications
      • Changes to programming in existing BAS
      • Rebates, Incentives, and Tariffs
      • Projected revenues
      • Energy Efficiency impacts and interactions with Demand Response.
    • 1/15/2013:
      added permanent load shifting option to EBOM

    Whole building design and construction projects must use actual and predicted wholebuilding energy consumption to meet the requirements below.

    Core and shell design and construction projects must use actual and predicted basebuilding energy consumption to meet the requirements below.

    Develop and implement a Measurement & Verification (M&V) program in accordance with Option D: Calibrated Simulation (either Savings Estimation Method 1 or 2), as specified by the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP), Concepts and Options for Determining Energy Savings in New Construction, Volume III, 2006.

    The M&V period must cover at least one year of post-construction occupancy.

    An executed contract(s) must be in place for all services necessary to execute the M&V program, including the eventual submittal of the final M&V report to the project team and building owner, including

    • Reconciliation between actual energy use and energy use predicted by EA Credit 1.
    • Discussion of reconciliation and variances between actual energy use and energy use predicted by EA Credit 1.
    • Actual avoided energy use compared to the EA Credit 1 baseline.
    • Avoided energy costs compared to the EA Credit 1 baseline.
    • Avoided GHG emissions compared to the EA Credit 1 baseline.
    • Recommendations for any remedial or future action.

    Projects that are connected to district energy systems must follow LEED’s DES requirements.

    Credit specific

    Note: As the pilot continues, requirements and submittal requirements will evolve. Please submit any additional documentation that you believe would be helpful in supporting your claims. This feedback will assist in future credit revisions.

    All Projects:

    • Complete the Google Form as submittal for this credit.
    • AND

    • Upload. Provide a copy of the contract(s) in place for all services necessary to execute the M&V program.
    • Upload. Provide a copy of the M&V Plan consistent with Option D: Calibrated Simulation in IPMVP Volume III, 2006.
    Additional Questions
    1. Were there barriers to implementing the strategies used under this credit?

    Develop and implement a tenant-level Measurement & Verification (M&V) program in accordance with Option D: Calibrated Simulation (either Savings Estimation Method 1 or 2), as specified by the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP), Concepts and Options for Determining Energy Savings in New Construction, Volume III, 2006.

    The M&V period must cover at least one year of post-construction occupancy.

    An executed contract(s) must be in place for all services necessary to execute the M&V program, including the eventual submittal of the final M&V report to the project team and building owner, including:

    • Reconciliation between actual tenant energy use and tenant energy use predicted by EA Credit 1.
    • Discussion of reconciliation and variances between actual tenant energy use and tenant energy use predicted by EA Credit 1.
    • Actual avoided tenant energy use compared to the EA Credit 1 baseline.
    • Avoided tenant energy costs compared to the EA Credit 1 baseline.
    • Avoided tenant GHG emissions compared to the EA Credit 1 baseline.
    • Recommendations for any remedial or future action.
    Credit specific

    Note: As the pilot continues, requirements and submittal requirements will evolve. Please submit any additional documentation that you believe would be helpful in supporting your claims. This feedback will assist in future credit revisions.

    All Projects:

    • Complete the Google Form as submittal for this credit.
    • AND

    • Upload. Provide a copy of the contract(s) in place for all services necessary to execute the M&V program.
    • Upload. Provide a copy of the M&V Plan consistent with Option D: Calibrated Simulation in IPMVP Volume III, 2006.
    Additional Questions
    1. Were there barriers to implementing the strategies used under this credit?

    Develop monitoring-based procedures and measurement points to be included in the Commissioning Plan. Address the following:

    • Roles and responsibilities
    • Measurement requirements: meters, points, metering systems, data access
    • List of points to be trended with associated frequency and duration for trending
    • Limits of acceptable values for tracked points and metered values. Where appropriate, the acceptable values can be determined by predictive algorithms in order to dynamically compare ideal values with actual values
    • Review elements that will be used to evaluate and identify performance of monitored points and associated systems, including but not limited to:
      • Conflict between systems
      • Out of sequence operation of systems components
      • Energy and water usage profiles
    • An action plan for correction of operational issues and deficiencies
      • Identification of operational errors and recommended training to help ensure errors are not duplicated
      • Repairs needed to maintain performance
    • Frequency of analyses in the first year of occupancy; analyses must occur at least quarterly
    Credit Specific:
    1. Confirm that the commissioning report contains the following:

      • List of systems that are metered, along with meter information and points that are monitored.
      • List of points trended with associated intervals and duration for trending
      • Limits of acceptable values for tracked points and metered values
      • List of issues identified regarding performance of monitoring points and associated systems, as well as corrective actions taken
    2. In the executive summary:
      • In addition to the items provided in the executive summary for EA Prerequisite 1: Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems, provide a summary of the items that are called out to be included in the commissioning report above.

    Note: With the submission of this pilot credit, include the commissioning report summary that was provided for EA Prerequisite 1: Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems in upload EAp1-1.

    Meet California South Coast Air Quality Management District standards for all products of combustion. Do not exceed the emission limits below for products of combustion, as outlined in the following California South Coast Air Quality Management District Rules:

    • (Amended February 1, 2008), Emissions from Gaseous- and Liquid-Fueled
      Internal Combustion Engines

    • 1111 (Amended July 8, 1983), NOx Emissions from Natural-Gas-Fired, FanType Central Furnaces
    • 1121 (Amended September 3, 2004) Control of Nitrogen Oxides from Residential Type, Natural Gas-Fired Water Heaters
    • 1146 (Amended November 17, 2000), Emissions of Oxides of Nitrogen from Industrial, Institutional, and Commercial Boilers, Steam Generators, and Process Heaters
    • 1146.1 (Amended May 13, 1994), Emissions of Oxides of Nitrogen from Small Industrial, Institutional, and Commercial Boilers, Steam Generators, and Process Heaters
    • 1146.2 (Amended May 5, 2006), Emissions of Oxides of Nitrogen from Large Water Heaters and Small Boilers and Process Heaters

    Equipment Types Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Carbon Monoxide (CO)
    Gaseous and Liquid-Fueled Stationary Engines – Emergency or Standby Power Uses 111ppm 301,2ppm 701ppm
    Gaseous and Liquid-Fueled Stationary Engines –
    Non-Emergency and Non-Standby Power Uses5
    0.070 lbs/MW-hr3 0.10 lbs/MW-hr4 0.20 lbs/MW-hr3
    Landfill and Digestor Gas-Fired Stationary Engines bhp>500: ppm = 36 x ECF1,6 Landfill Gas: 401,2
    Digestor Gas: 250 x ECF1,2,6
    2,000 ppm1
    Natural-Gas-Fired, Fan-Type Central Furnaces (heating only with input rate less than 175,000 BTUH, or heating and cooling with cooling rate of less than 65,000 BTUH) 40 nanograms (calculated as NO2) per joule of useful heat delivered to the heated space    
    Residential Type, Natural Gas-Fired Water Heaters 15 ppm7 or 10 nanograms (calculated as NO2) per joule of heat output    
    Boilers, Steam Generators, Water Heaters, and Process Heaters
    (rated heat input capacity less than or equal to 400,000 BTU per hour)
    55 ppm7 or 40 nanograms (calculated as NO2) per joule of heat output    
    Boilers, Steam Generators, Water Heaters and Process Heaters rated heat input capacity greater than 400,000 BTU per hour and less than or equal to 2,000,000 BTU per hour) 20 ppm7 or 40 nanograms (calculated as NO2) per joule of heat output   400 ppm
    Boilers, Steam Generators, Water Heaters, and Process Heaters
    (rated heat input capacity greater than 2,000,000 BTU per hour and less than 5,000,000 BTU per hour)
    30 ppm7 or 0.037 pounds per million BTU of heat input   400 ppm7
    Boilers, Steam Generators, Water Heaters, and Process Heaters
    (rated heat input capacity greater than or equal to 5,000,000 BTU per hour)8,9
    30 ppm7 or 0.036 pounds per million BTU of heat input   400 ppm7
    Notes:

    1. Parts per million by volume, corrected to 15% oxygen on a dry basis and averaged over 15 minutes.
    2. Measured as carbon.
    3. The averaging time of the emission standards is 15 minutes.
    4. Mass emissions of VOC shall be calculated using a ratio of 16.04 pounds of VOC per lb-mole of carbon.
    5. Emissions limits shall be subject to adjustment for engines that produce combined heat and electrical power (see Rule 1110.2)
    6. ECF is the efficiency correction factor.
    7. Parts per million by volume, corrected to 3% oxygen on a dry basis.
    8. Capacity Factor greater than 25%.
    9. Units with a heat input capacity greater than 40 million BTU per hour and an annual heat input greater than 200 x 109 BTU per year shall have a continuous in-stack nitrogen oxides monitor or equivalent verification system in compliance with 40 CFR part 60 Appendix B Specification 2.

    For engines of 1,000 bhp and greater, install, operate and maintain in calibration a NOX Continuous Emission Monitoring System (CEMS) with data gathering and retrieval capability.

    Projects that do not contain combustion equipment are not eligible for this credit.

    Establishment
    Consumption feedback

    Implement one or more modes of communication to inform occupants about the actual energy consumption of the building and/or their workspace. This may be done in real-time, or through regular reporting mechanisms, but must be communicated at least on a monthly basis. Occupants must be given information with a relevant comparison point; the comparison point(s) may either be comparable buildings or spaces, or historical energy consumption data for the same space (at least 1 years worth of data, or predicted usage if 1 years data is not yet available).

    Occupant empowerment

    Implement and maintain an occupant engagement program that involves communicating with, enabling and empowering building occupants to help meet the sustainability goals for the building. The occupant engagement initiative(s) must include the following minimum requirements:

    1. Education – provide accurate, up-to-date, and catered information to building occupants about what their largest impacts are on the energy use of the building and where the largest areas for potential savings exist. This may be achieved through a one-time event like a competition or awareness week or month, but also must include some permanent educational components, which must be updated to account for any seasonal variations in energy consumption and building performance.
    2. Enabling – occupants must be made aware of specific actions they can take to improve the performance of the building, not just the impacts they have on resource use in their building
    3. Feedback to management – occupants must be provided a clear avenue for reporting building-related energy or water inefficiencies to building management

    Establish performance goals and develop a way to effectively track the success of the program.

    The engagement program must also address more than one building system: lighting, HVAC, plug loads. If occupants do not have direct control over lighting and/or central HVAC systems, alternative methods and strategies that support energy conservation for these systems are acceptable (e.g., window shade control and use).

    The engagement program must not encourage behaviors that significantly affect the productivity of occupants or their comfort, such as lighting quality and thermal comfort.

    Performance

    Track and document the results of the occupant engagement initiative(s) against the established performance goals and identify areas for improvement. These results must be recorded on a regular basis and summarized for the performance period.

    Credit specific
    1. Provide a summary of occupant engagement program that includes, at a minimum

      1. Performance goals for the program and how they relate to the overall sustainability goals for the building
      2. Communication mechanism(s) used for consumption feedback and the data/information presented to occupants about the actual energy consumption of the building and/or their space
      3. Specific energy-saving actions occupants were encouraged to take

    Optional:

    1. If available, submit any metrics and/or quantitative data used to measure the success of the occupant engagement program (e.g., energy consumption data, records of complaint/report logs, event participation records, etc.)
    Additional questions
    • Were you able to understand and comply with the credit language as written
    • In four sentences or less, why did the project choose to pursue this pilot credit?
    • Were the barriers to implementing the strategies used under this credit
    • Prior to the implementation of the occupant engagement program, in your own judgement, how would you have defined the level of knowledge the occupants had about energy efficient practices (e.g., environmentally savvy, clueless, not sure)?
    • Did you notice any change(s) in occupant behavior in relation to energy efficient practices during and/or after the implementation of the occupant engagement program?
    • Were there aspects of the occupant engagement program that you thought about implementing but then decided not to?
    • What are your plans for maintaining the occupant engagement program after the conclusion of the performance period?
    • Did this program have support from upper-level management?
Option 1. environmental product declaration (EPD) (1 point)

Use at least 20 different permanently installed products sourced from at least five different manufacturers that meet one of the disclosure criteria below.

  • Product-specific declaration.

    • Products with a publicly available, critically reviewed life-cycle assessment conforming to ISO 14044 that have at least a cradle to gate scope are valued as one quarter (1/4) of a product for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • Environmental Product Declarations which conform to ISO 14025, 14040, 14044, and EN 15804 or ISO 21930 and have at least a cradle to gate scope.
    • Industry-wide (generic) EPD -- Products with third-party certification (Type III), including external verification, in which the manufacturer is explicitly recognized as a participant by the program operator are valued as one half (1/2) of a product for purposes of credit achievement calculation.

    • Product-specific Type III EPD -- Products with third-party certification (Type III), including external verification in which the manufacturer is explicitly recognized as the participant by the program operator are valued as one whole product for purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • USGBC approved program – Products that comply with other USGBC approved environmental product declaration frameworks.
Credit specific:

Prepare a list of products purchased contributing toward credit. List the cost and number of items purchased, include information of percentage of product contributing to each criterion. Calculate the weighted value according to total weight of materials purchased. The scope of credits is envisioned to include all non-structural materials that have previously been included in LEED Materials and Resources credits plus those specifically listed as optional, i.e. all product permanently installed products excluding structural and envelope materials.

Additional questions:
  1. Was information on the location of products’ final manufacturing location easily available? (Especially when only counting a percentage of weight)
  2. How likely are you to include furniture in this credit? Why/why not?
  3. Do you find that many products comply with more than one attribute for this credit or these are difficult to come across? (i.e. you are able to use recycled content from a local manufacturer that has a closed-loop recycling program?)
  4. Do you believe the performance threshold of 50% is reasonable? Does it instigate market change?
Changes:
Option 1. environmental product declaration (EPD) (1 point)

Use at least 20 different permanently installed products sourced from at least five different manufacturers that meet one of the disclosure criteria below.

  • Product-specific declaration.

    • Products with a publicly available, critically reviewed life-cycle assessment conforming to ISO 14044 that have at least a cradle to gate scope are valued as one quarter (1/4) of a product for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • Environmental Product Declarations which conform to ISO 14025, 14040, 14044, and EN 15804 or ISO 21930 and have at least a cradle to gate scope.
    • Industry-wide (generic) EPD -- Products with third-party certification (Type III), including external verification, in which the manufacturer is explicitly recognized as a participant by the program operator are valued as one half (1/2) of a product for purposes of credit achievement calculation.

    • Product-specific Type III EPD -- Products with third-party certification (Type III), including external verification in which the manufacturer is explicitly recognized as the participant by the program operator are valued as one whole product for purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • USGBC approved program – Products that comply with other USGBC approved environmental product declaration frameworks.
Credit specific:

Prepare a list of products purchased contributing toward credit. List the cost and number of items purchased, include information of percentage of product contributing to each criterion. Calculate the weighted value according to total weight of materials purchased. The scope of credits is envisioned to include all non-structural materials that have previously been included in LEED Materials and Resources credits plus those specifically listed as optional, i.e. all product permanently installed products excluding structural and envelope materials.

Additional questions:
  1. Was information on the location of products’ final manufacturing location easily available? (Especially when only counting a percentage of weight)
  2. How likely are you to include furniture in this credit? Why/why not?
  3. Do you find that many products comply with more than one attribute for this credit or these are difficult to come across? (i.e. you are able to use recycled content from a local manufacturer that has a closed-loop recycling program?)
  4. Do you believe the performance threshold of 50% is reasonable? Does it instigate market change?
Changes:
Option 1. raw material source and extraction reporting (1 point)

Use at least 20 different permanently installed products from at least five different manufacturers that have publicly released a report from their raw material suppliers which include raw material supplier extraction locations, a commitment to long-term ecologically responsible land use, a commitment to reducing environmental harms from extraction and/or manufacturing processes, and a commitment to meeting applicable standards or programs voluntarily that address responsible sourcing criteria.

  • Products sourced from manufacturers with self-declared reports are valued as one half (1/2) of a product for credit achievement.

  • Third-party verified corporate sustainability reports (CSR) which include environmental impacts of extraction operations and activities associated with the manufacturer’s product and the product’s supply chain, are valued as one whole product for credit achievement calculation. Acceptable CSR frameworks include the following:
    • Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Report

    • Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises
    • U.N. Global Compact: Communication of Progress
    • ISO 26000: 2010 Guidance on Social Responsibility
    • USGBC approved program: Other USGBC approved programs meeting the CSR criteria.

OR

Option 2. leadership extraction practices (1 point)

Use products that meet at least one of the responsible extraction criteria below for at least 25%, by cost, of the total value of permanently installed building products in the project.

  • Extended producer responsibility. Products purchased from a manufacturer (producer) that participates in an extended producer responsibility program or is directly responsible for extended producer responsibility. Products meeting extended producer responsibility criteria are valued at 50% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.

  • Bio-based materials. Bio-based products must meet the Sustainable Agriculture Network’s Sustainable Agriculture Standard. Bio-based raw materials must be tested using ASTM Test Method D6866 and be legally harvested, as defined by the exporting and receiving country. Exclude hide products, such as leather and other animal skin material. Products meeting bio-based materials criteria are valued at 100% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • Wood products. Wood products must be certified by the Forest Stewardship Council or USGBC-approved equivalent. Products meeting wood products criteria are valued at 100% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • Materials reuse. Reuse includes salvaged, refurbished, or reused products. Products meeting materials reuse criteria are valued at 100% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • Recycled content. Recycled content is the sum of postconsumer recycled content plus one-half the preconsumer recycled content, based on cost. Products meeting recycled content criteria are valued at 100% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • USGBC approved program. Other USGBC approved programs meeting leadership extraction criteria.

For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost. For credit achievement calculation, the base contributing cost of individual products compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted to exceed 100% its total actual cost (before regional multipliers) and double counting of single product components compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted and in no case is a product permitted to contribute more than 200% of its total actual cost.

Structure and enclosure materials may not constitute more than 30% of the value of compliant building products.

Credit specific:

Submit a list of products purchased contributing toward credit and their corresponding raw material. List the cost and number of items purchased per contributing products and calculate the weighted value according to total weight of materials purchased. Provide documentation showing adherence to applicable disclosure requirements.

Additional questions:
  1. The raw material sourcing disclosure reporting requirements does not specify a third party. However it is anticipated that in the near future Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) will be the only organization to support these reporting requirements. Were you able to purchase from manufacturers who source from raw material companies reporting to GRI? Were there other organizations meeting the reporting criteria? What were major challenges in finding compliant materials?
  2. What manufacturers where you able to find utilizing mined and quarried materials sourcing companies utilizing the Framework for Responsible Mining? Who are the early adopters?
Changes:
  • Changes as a result of 3rd Public Comment (3/1/2012):
    Raw material disclosure requirement was rolled into responsible extraction requirements.
    Bio-based redefined to define other materials besides wood.
    Labor practices and governance structure added to required publically available list for Other Extracted Materials.
    Weightings added to materials sourced domestically, regionally and locally.
    Recycled content and salvaged materials are not to be included in calculation.
    FSC – Pure requirement replaced with FSC Certified
  • Changes as a result of 5th Public Comment (1/15/2013):
    Modified to align with Building product disclosure and optimization - sourcing of raw materials
Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?

* This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

Option 1. raw material source and extraction reporting (1 point)

Use at least 20 different permanently installed products from at least five different manufacturers that have publicly released a report from their raw material suppliers which include raw material supplier extraction locations, a commitment to long-term ecologically responsible land use, a commitment to reducing environmental harms from extraction and/or manufacturing processes, and a commitment to meeting applicable standards or programs voluntarily that address responsible sourcing criteria.

  • Products sourced from manufacturers with self-declared reports are valued as one half (1/2) of a product for credit achievement.

  • Third-party verified corporate sustainability reports (CSR) which include environmental impacts of extraction operations and activities associated with the manufacturer’s product and the product’s supply chain, are valued as one whole product for credit achievement calculation. Acceptable CSR frameworks include the following:
    • Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Sustainability Report

    • Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises
    • U.N. Global Compact: Communication of Progress
    • ISO 26000: 2010 Guidance on Social Responsibility
    • USGBC approved program: Other USGBC approved programs meeting the CSR criteria.

OR

Option 2. leadership extraction practices (1 point)

Use products that meet at least one of the responsible extraction criteria below for at least 25%, by cost, of the total value of permanently installed building products in the project.

  • Extended producer responsibility. Products purchased from a manufacturer (producer) that participates in an extended producer responsibility program or is directly responsible for extended producer responsibility. Products meeting extended producer responsibility criteria are valued at 50% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.

  • Bio-based materials. Bio-based products must meet the Sustainable Agriculture Network’s Sustainable Agriculture Standard. Bio-based raw materials must be tested using ASTM Test Method D6866 and be legally harvested, as defined by the exporting and receiving country. Exclude hide products, such as leather and other animal skin material. Products meeting bio-based materials criteria are valued at 100% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • Wood products. Wood products must be certified by the Forest Stewardship Council or USGBC-approved equivalent. Products meeting wood products criteria are valued at 100% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • Materials reuse. Reuse includes salvaged, refurbished, or reused products. Products meeting materials reuse criteria are valued at 100% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • Recycled content. Recycled content is the sum of postconsumer recycled content plus one-half the preconsumer recycled content, based on cost. Products meeting recycled content criteria are valued at 100% of their cost for the purposes of credit achievement calculation.
  • USGBC approved program. Other USGBC approved programs meeting leadership extraction criteria.

For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost. For credit achievement calculation, the base contributing cost of individual products compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted to exceed 100% its total actual cost (before regional multipliers) and double counting of single product components compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted and in no case is a product permitted to contribute more than 200% of its total actual cost.

Structure and enclosure materials may not constitute more than 30% of the value of compliant building products.

Meet the requirements of the credit above and include furniture and furnishings within the project’s scope of work.

Credit specific:

Submit a list of products purchased contributing toward credit and their corresponding raw material. List the cost and number of items purchased per contributing products and calculate the weighted value according to total weight of materials purchased. Provide documentation showing adherence to applicable disclosure requirements.

Additional questions:
  1. The raw material sourcing disclosure reporting requirements does not specify a third party. However it is anticipated that in the near future Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) will be the only organization to support these reporting requirements. Were you able to purchase from manufacturers who source from raw material companies reporting to GRI? Were there other organizations meeting the reporting criteria? What were major challenges in finding compliant materials?
  2. What manufacturers where you able to find utilizing mined and quarried materials sourcing companies utilizing the Framework for Responsible Mining? Who are the early adopters?
Changes:
  • Changes as a result of 3rd Public Comment (3/1/2012):
    Raw material disclosure requirement was rolled into responsible extraction requirements.
    Bio-based redefined to define other materials besides wood.
    Labor practices and governance structure added to required publically available list for Other Extracted Materials.
    Weightings added to materials sourced domestically, regionally and locally.
    Recycled content and salvaged materials are not to be included in calculation.
    FSC – Pure requirement replaced with FSC Certified
  • Changes as a result of 5th Public Comment (1/15/2013):
    Modified to align with Building product disclosure and optimization - sourcing of raw materials
Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?
Credit Closed

This credit closed to new registrations on February 15, 2013. Projects that registered for the pilot credit prior to February 15, 2013 may continue to pursue the credit.

Use a minimum of 20%, by cost, of at least 3 building product and material types meeting one of the options below.

Chemical avoidance

Option 1. Avoidance

Use third party certified building products and materials that do not contain intentionally added substances present in the end product over the reporting thresholds below. Calculate compliant building products and materials at cost.

Substance Allowed Concentration
Lead and lead compounds 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Mercury 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Cadmium 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Anitmony 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Hexavalent Chromium 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Carcinogens listed in California’s Proposition 65 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
For projects outside the U.S. additionally avoid carcinogens listed on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) substances of very high concern (SVHC) Candidate List Under levels that would trigger notification

AND/OR
Option 2. Additional avoidance

Meet the requirements of Option 1.

AND

Use third party certified building products and materials that do not contain intentionally added substances present in the end product over the reporting thresholds below. Calculate compliant building products and materials at twice the cost.

Substance Allowed Concentration
Halogenated organic compounds including:
•     Chlorinated polyethylene (CPE)
•     Chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC)
•     Chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSPE)
•     Polychloroprene (CR or chloroprene rubber, also brand name Neoprene)
•     Polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
•     Fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP)
0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
 
Brominated or halogenated flame retardants (BFRs and HFRs) containing bromine, chlorine, or fluorine including:
•     PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ether), including Deca-BDE (Decabromodiphenyl ether)
•     Tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA)
•     Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD)  
•     Tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP)
•     Tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP)
•     Dechlorane Plus 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Phthalates including:
•     - Butyl Benzyl Phthalate (BBP)
•     -Di(2-Ethylhexyl)Phthalate (DEHP)
•     - Di-N-Octyl Phthalate (DNOP)
•     - Di-N-Pentyl Phthalate (DNPP)
•     - Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP)
•     - Diisobutyl Phthalate (DIBP)
•     - Diisodecyl Phthalate (DIDP)
•     - Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP)
•     - Di-N-Hexylphthalate (DNHP)
0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Benzidine Dyes 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Bisphenol A 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Short-chain chlorinated paraffins 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI) 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Chemicals known to cause reproductive toxicity listed in California’s Proposition 65 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
For projects outside the U.S.: Additionally avoid chemicals listed as toxic for reproduction on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) substances of very high concern (SVHC) Candidate List Under levels that would trigger notification.

1From the EPA’s Chemical Action Plans (US Environmental Protection Agency, Pollution Prevention and
Toxics, Existing Chemicals Program (US EPA PPT) http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/)
Specific listing from California Prop 65 (California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment
(OEHHA) list of Chemicals Known to the State to Cause Cancer or Reproductive Toxicity, Safe Drinking Water
and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) http://www.oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65_list/Newlist.html)

Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?
Credit Closed

This credit closed to new registrations on February 15, 2013. Projects that registered for the pilot credit prior to February 15, 2013 may continue to pursue the credit.

Use a minimum of 20%, by cost, of at least 3 building product and material types meeting one of the options below.

Chemical avoidance

Option 1. Avoidance

Use third party certified building products and materials that do not contain intentionally added substances present in the end product over the reporting thresholds below. Calculate compliant building products and materials at cost.

Substance Allowed Concentration
Lead and lead compounds 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Mercury 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Cadmium 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Anitmony 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Hexavalent Chromium 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs) 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Carcinogens listed in California’s Proposition 65 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
For projects outside the U.S. additionally avoid carcinogens listed on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) substances of very high concern (SVHC) Candidate List Under levels that would trigger notification

AND/OR
Option 2. Additional avoidance

Meet the requirements of Option 1.

AND

Use third party certified building products and materials that do not contain intentionally added substances present in the end product over the reporting thresholds below. Calculate compliant building products and materials at twice the cost.

Substance Allowed Concentration
Halogenated organic compounds including:
•     Chlorinated polyethylene (CPE)
•     Chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC)
•     Chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSPE)
•     Polychloroprene (CR or chloroprene rubber, also brand name Neoprene)
•     Polyvinyl chloride (PVC)
•     Fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP)
0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
 
Brominated or halogenated flame retardants (BFRs and HFRs) containing bromine, chlorine, or fluorine including:
•     PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ether), including Deca-BDE (Decabromodiphenyl ether)
•     Tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA)
•     Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD)  
•     Tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP)
•     Tris(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP)
•     Dechlorane Plus 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Phthalates including:
•     - Butyl Benzyl Phthalate (BBP)
•     -Di(2-Ethylhexyl)Phthalate (DEHP)
•     - Di-N-Octyl Phthalate (DNOP)
•     - Di-N-Pentyl Phthalate (DNPP)
•     - Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP)
•     - Diisobutyl Phthalate (DIBP)
•     - Diisodecyl Phthalate (DIDP)
•     - Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP)
•     - Di-N-Hexylphthalate (DNHP)
0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Benzidine Dyes 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Bisphenol A 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Short-chain chlorinated paraffins 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI) 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
Chemicals known to cause reproductive toxicity listed in California’s Proposition 65 0.01% by mass (100 ppm)
For projects outside the U.S.: Additionally avoid chemicals listed as toxic for reproduction on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) substances of very high concern (SVHC) Candidate List Under levels that would trigger notification.

1From the EPA’s Chemical Action Plans (US Environmental Protection Agency, Pollution Prevention and
Toxics, Existing Chemicals Program (US EPA PPT) http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/)
Specific listing from California Prop 65 (California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment
(OEHHA) list of Chemicals Known to the State to Cause Cancer or Reproductive Toxicity, Safe Drinking Water
and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986 (Proposition 65) http://www.oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65_list/Newlist.html)

Meet the requirements of the credit above; however, furniture and furnishings that are within project’s scope of work must be included in credit calculations.

Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?

* This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

Option 2. Multi-attribute optimization (1 point)

Use products that comply with one of the criteria below for 50%, by cost, of the total value of permanently installed products in the project. Products will be valued as below.

  • Third party certified products that demonstrate impact reduction below industry average in at least three of the following categories are valued at 100% of their cost for credit achievement calculations.

    • global warming potential (greenhouse gases), in CO2e;

    • depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, in kg CFC-11;
    • acidification of land and water sources, in moles H+ or kg SO2;
    • eutrophication, in kg nitrogen or kg phosphate;
    • formation of tropospheric ozone, in kg NOx, kg O3 eq, or kg ethene; and
    • depletion of nonrenewable energy resources, in MJ.
  • USGBC approved program -- Products that comply with other USGBC approved multi-attribute frameworks.

For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost.

Structure and enclosure materials may not constitute more than 30% of the value of compliant building products.

Credit specific

Provide a list of products purchased contributing toward credit and indicate the applicable label/certification. List the cost and number of items purchased per product and calculate the weighted value according to the table above.

Additional questions:
  1. How difficult was it to locate the applicable level of labels receiving credit?
  2. How were you able to obtain EPD information for products? How difficult was it?
  3. What were the major barriers to achieving credit performance? Do you think the threshold(s) is reasonable?
  4. What labels would you like USGBC to consider for inclusion in this pilot credit?
  5. Was CEN (EN) standard 15804 available at the time you documented this credit? Was that standard applicable to your project?
Changes
  • Changes as a result of 3rd Public Comment (3/1/2012):
    This credit replaces Pilot Credit 43: Certified Products “EPD Pathway”
    Deletion of Self declared LCA – while this is an admirable first step in product transparency, it does not depict leadership in the market. USGBC wishes to push the development of Product Category rules and their implementation.
  • Changes as a result of 5th Public Comment (01/15/2013):
    Credit updated to align with Building product disclosure and optimization - environmental product declarations - Option 2
Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?
Credit Closed

This credit closed to new registrations on February 15, 2013. Projects that registered for the pilot credit prior to February 15, 2013 may continue to pursue the credit.

Use a minimum of 20%, by cost, of at least 3 building product and material types meeting one of the options below.

Option 1. Manufacturer declared disclosure

Use building products and materials with manufacturer provided disclosure of chemical compounds that meet Clean Production Action’s Green Screen v1.2 Benchmark 1: Avoid Chemicals of High Concern criteria. The disclosure statement shall include homogeneous materials that make up at least 99% of the material by weight. Calculate compliant building products and materials at half of their cost.

Option 2. Third party certified disclosure

Use building products and materials meeting the disclosure requirements in Option 1 with third party certified disclosure of chemical compounds.

For Product Formulators:
Chemicals to be disclosed are those that are intentionally added, plus known residuals, in concentrations of 0.01% by mass (100 parts per million (ppm)) within each of the homogeneous materials. Disclosure can either be listing by CAS number of by hazard communication based on the Green Screen v1.2 Benchmark 1: Avoid Chemicals of High Concern.

Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?

* This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

Option 4. whole-building life-cycle assessment (3 points)

For new construction (buildings or portions of buildings), conduct a life-cycle assessment of the project’s structure and enclosure that demonstrates a minimum of 10% reduction, compared with a baseline building, in at least three of the six impact categories listed below, one of which must be global warming potential. No impact category assessed as part of the life-cycle assessment may increase by more than 5% compared with the baseline building.

The baseline and proposed buildings must be of comparable size, function, orientation, and operating energy performance as defined in EA Prerequisite Minimum Energy Performance. The service life of the baseline and proposed buildings must be the same and at least 60 years to fully account for maintenance and replacement. Use the same life-cycle assessment software tools and data sets to evaluate both the baseline building and the proposed building, and report all listed impact categories. Data sets must be compliant with ISO 14044.

Select at least three of the following impact categories for reduction:

  • global warming potential (greenhouse gases), in CO2e;

  • depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, in kg CFC-11;
  • acidification of land and water sources, in moles H+ or kg SO2;
  • eutrophication, in kg nitrogen or kg phosphate;
  • formation of tropospheric ozone, in kg NOx, kg O3 eq, or kg ethene; and
  • depletion of nonrenewable energy resources, in MJ.
Credit specific:

The idea of this credit is to explore the holistic environmental impacts of material selection for structure and assembly. At a minimum submit summary life cycle inventory and assessment results for the materials and assemblies explored. As well as a comprehensive narrative outlining why the assemblies chosen were compared, any conclusions learned as part of the process, and any decisions made as a result of the study. If the project does not have an energy model ensure the same operational energy use is used in all assessments. The software tools approved for use in this pilot credit are the Athena Impact Estimator, GaBi, and SimaPro. If other tools are used please provide evidence that the tool meets the ISO requirements.

Additional questions:
  1. What LCA database was used to conduct analysis? Why did you choose it? What did you think of the tool’s usability and technical rigor?
  2. Was obtaining product or brand specific LCIA data from manufactures difficult (or even possible)? Where there any other major hindrances to earning this credit?
  3. Do you think it is appropriate for this to be a design phase credit? Why or why not?
  4. Was the safety of alternative materials chosen a concern? Why or why not?
Changes:
  • Changes as a result of 3rd Public Comment (3/1/2012):
    Former Option 1 and Option 2 completely removed.
    Credit implementation strategy modified, intent remains the same.
  • Changes as a result of 5th Public Comment (1/15/2013):
    Modified to align with Building life-cycle impact reduction - Option 4

This credit includes requirements for product manufacturing as well as project teams. It covers both the VOC content of materials and the methods by which VOC emissions are determined in indoor air. Different materials have different requirements that must be met in order to be considered compliant for this credit. To determine total level of compliance,this credit organizes the building interior and exterior1 into seven categories, each with different thresholds of compliance:

If some products in a category do not meet the criteria, project teams may use the budget calculation method. Project teams may combine calculation methodologies.

Budget Calculation Method

The budget method organizes the building interior into six assemblies:

  1. Flooring
  2. Ceilings
  3. Walls
  4. Thermal and Acoustic Insulation
  5. Furniture
  6. Healthcare and Schools projects only: Exterior Applied Products.

If furniture is included in the scope of the work, include furniture in the credit calculations. Walls, ceilings, and flooring are defined as building interior products3 where each layer of the assembly, including paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants must be evaluated for compliance. Insulation is tracked separately.

Surface area shall be calculated based upon manufacturer’s documentation for how to apply products.

If 90% of a system meets the criteria, the system shall count as 100% compliant. If less than 50% of a system meets the criteria, the system shall count as 0% compliant.

Emission & Content Requirements

To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet all of the following requirements, as applicable:

Manufacturers’ claims
Both first-party and third-party claims regarding product compliance shall follow the guidelines in CDPH SM V1.1-2010, Section 8. Organizations certifying manufacturers’ claims regarding product compliance with the tests specified within this credit shall be ISO Guide 65 accredited.

Laboratory requirements
Laboratories conducting the tests specified within this credit shall be ISO/IEC 17025 accredited with relevant test methods included in their scopes of accreditation.

Inherently non-emitting sources
Products that are inherently non-emitting sources of VOCs – specifically stone, ceramics, powder-coated metals, plated metals or anodized metals, glass, concrete, clay brick, and unfinished/untreated solid wood flooring – are considered fully compliant without any VOC emissions testing if they do not include integral organic-based surface coatings, binders, or sealants.

General Emissions Evaluation
Building products shall be tested and determined compliant in accordance with California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Standard Method V1.1-2010 using the applicable exposure scenario. The default scenario shall be the private office scenario. A manufacturer or third-party certification claiming compliance of a product with any of the accepted standards stated above shall state the exposure scenario used to determine compliance. For wet-applied products the claim of compliance shall state what thicknesses are included and, if applicable, what tints are included within the claim.

Manufacturers stating compliance with the above requirements must also state which range of TVOCs the product falls under after 14 days (336 hours), measured as specified in the CDPH Standard Method v1.1:

  • less than or equal to 0.5 mg/m3
  • between 0.5 and 5.0 mg/m3
  • greater than or equal to 5.0 mg/m3

For LEED projects outside North America, testing and evaluation with either the CDPH standard method or the German AgBB Testing and Evaluation Scheme (2010)6 together with ISO 16000parts 3, 6, 9 and 11, or DIBt testing method, or the 2013 implementation of the CEN/TC351 will be accepted7. U.S. projects must follow the CDPH standard method.

If the CDPH standard method does not specify testing details for a product group for which there are details specified in ISO 16000-11, then the specifications in ISO 16000-11 shall be used. If ISO 16000-11 does not specify testing details for a product group for which there are details specified in CDPH standard method, then the specifications in CDPH standard method shall be used.

Additional VOC Content Requirements for Wet Applied Products
In addition to the above specified general requirements with focus on building occupant exposure to VOC emissions from large surfaces, on-site wet applied products shall not contain excessive levels of VOC for minimizing impacts on installers and other tradesduring and immediately after application of the involved products. To demonstrate compliance, a product or layer must meet the following requirements, as applicable:

  • All paints and coatings wet applied on-site shall meet the applicable respective VOC limits of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 Suggested Control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings or the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1113 effective June 3, 2011.
  • All adhesives and sealants wet applied on-site shall meet the applicable chemical content requirements of SCAQMD Rule 1168 as of July 1, 2005, “Adhesive and sealant applications” as analyzed by the methods specified in Rule 1168. The provisions of SCAQMD Rule 1168 shall not apply to adhesives and sealants subject to state or federal consumer product VOC regulations.
  • For LEED projects outside North America, all paints, coatings, adhesives and sealants wet applied on-site shall conform to the technical requirements of either the above regulations, or they shall be in compliance with applicable national VOC control regulations, e.g. the European "Decopaint" Directive (2004/42/EC), the Canadian VOC Concentration Limits for Architectural Coatings or the Hong Kong Air Pollution Control (VOC) Regulation.
  • If the applied regulation requires subtraction of exempt compounds, then any content of intentionally added exempt compounds larger than 0.5% weight by mass (total exempt compounds) shall be disclosed. For LEED projects in North America, the carcinogenic listed exempt VOCs methylene chloride and perchloroethylene may not be intentionally added in paints, coatings, adhesives or sealants.
  • Disclosure of VOC content shall be done by declaration of manufacturer. If testing is performed then it shall follow the test method as specified in the respective regulation.
  • For purposes of hazard evaluation and product selection, manufacturers shall clearly indicate the flashpoint and flammability category for product as supplied and as prepared for use consistent with GHS SDS regulations.
  • If the test method specified in above regulations is not reasonably applicable to a specific product then testing of VOC content shall be done as specified in any of the following standards: ASTM D2369-10, ISO 11890 part 1, ASTM D6886-03, or ISO 11890-2

Healthcare and Schools Projects only: Additional Insulation Requirements
Batt insulation products shall contain no added formaldehyde, including urea formaldehyde, phenol formaldehyde, and urea-extended phenol formaldehyde.

Composite Wood
Compliance is determined based on the following criteria intended to limit the sources of indoor VOC contaminants.

  • Composite woods constituting all or a portion of a product must be constructed with materials documented to have low formaldehyde emissions that meet the
    California Air Resources Board ATCM for formaldehyde requirements for UltraLow-Emitting Formaldehyde (ULEF) resins or No-Added Formaldehyde based resins.
  • Salvaged and re-used architectural millwork more than one-year old at the time of occupancy is considered compliant provided it meets the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

Furniture
New furniture and furnishing items shall be tested following ANSI/BIFMA Standard Method M7.1-2011. Comply with BIFMA e3-2011 Furniture Sustainability Standard, Sections 7.6.1 and 7.6.2 using either the concentration modeling approach or the emission factor approach. Model the test results using the open plan, private office, or seating scenario in ANSI/BIFMA M7.1 as appropriate. For classroom furniture, use the standard school classroom model in CDPH Standard Method v1.1. Documentation submitted for furniture shall state which modeling scenarios were used to determine compliance.

Salvaged and re-used furniture more than one-year old at the time of use is considered compliant provided they meet the requirements for any site-applied paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants.

Healthcare and Schools projects only:

Exterior8 Applied Products
Adhesives, sealants, coatings, roofing and waterproofing materials applied on-site shall meet the VOC limits of California Air Resources Board (CARB) 2007 Suggested Control Measure (SCM) for Architectural Coatings and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule 1168 effective July 1, 2005. The provisions of this section shall not apply to small containers of adhesives and sealants subject to state or federal consumer product VOC regulations.

For LEED projects outside North America, either the jurisdictional VOC content requirements or compliance with the European "Decopaint" Directive (2004/42/EC, to be updated to most current version when available) Phase II, water-borne coatings, as analyzed by the methods specified in ISO 11890 parts 1 and 2, will be accepted as an alternative to referenced CARB and SCAQMD regulatory standards.

The following are prohibited and do not count toward total % compliant:

  • Projects shall not use hot-mopped asphalt installation techniques for roofing.
  • Parking lots and other paved surfaces shall not use coal tar sealants.
1The building interior is defined as everything within the waterproofing membrane. The building exterior is defined as everything outside and inclusive of the primary and secondary weatherproofing system, including waterproofing membranes and air and water resistive barrier materials.
2The furniture and furnishings category is comprised of all the stand-alone furniture items purchased for the project including: individual and group seating; open-plan and private-office workstations; desks of all types, tables of all types; storage units, credenzas, bookshelves, filing cabinets and other case goods; wall-mounted, visual display products (e.g., markerboards and tackboards, excluding electronic display products); and miscellaneous items such as easels, mobile carts, freestanding screens, and movable partitions. Movable partitions include office furniture system cubicle panels that are typically integrated with work surfaces, desks, and storage furniture. Hospitality furniture is included as applicable to the project. Office accessories, such as desk top blotters, trays, tape dispensers, waste baskets, and all electrical items such as lighting and small appliances are excluded from the scope of this credit.
3Interior finish is defined as interior wall, ceiling, and floor finish. Interior wall and ceiling finish is defined
as all the layers comprising the exposed interior surfaces of buildings including fixed walls, fixed partitions, columns, exposed ceilings, and interior wainscoting, paneling, interior trim or other finish applied structurally or for decoration, acoustical correction, surface fire resistance, or similar purposes. Interior floor finish is defined as all the layers applied over a finished sub-floor or stairs, including stair treads and risers, ramps, and other walking surfaces. Interior finish excludes building structural members such as beams, trusses, studs, subfloors, or similar items. Interior finish also excludes non-full spread wet coatings or adhesives.
4For areas with multiple plane ceilings, all planes must be calculated.
5Products meeting both criteria may be counted for each, but the total % compliant for furniture may not exceed 100%.
6AGBB, Ausschuss zur gesundheitlichen Bewertung von Bauprodukten, Evaluation Procedure for VOCs from Building Products, Committee for Health-related Evaluation of Building Products –May 2010. www.umweltbundesamt.de/produkte-e/bauprodukte/agbb.htm and www.agbb-nik.de/index_en.php.
7The formaldehyde limit value of 10 µg/m3 at 28 days must also be met when using the AGBB alternative, as specified for class A+ in French compulsory VOC emissions class labeling. See the Décret no 2011-321 du 23 mars 2011 relatif à l’étiquetage des produits de construction ou de revêtement de mur ou de sol et des peintures et vernis sur leurs émissions de polluants volatils and the Arrêté relatif à l’étiquetage des produits de construction ou de revêtement de mur ou de sol et des peintures et vernis sur leurs émissions de polluants volatils (http://www.developpement-durable.gouv.fr/Chapitre-II-Industriels-comment...).
8The building interior is defined as everything within the waterproofing membrane. The building exterior is defined as everything outside and inclusive of the primary and secondary weatherproofing system, including waterproofing membranes and air and water resistive barrier materials.
Credit specific
  1. Provide supporting documentation to confirm that each material is within the requirements prescribed for this credit
  2. Maintain a list of all interior materials used that fall under the scope of this credit. Include the manufacturer’s name, product name, and specific VOC data for each product, as well as the corresponding allowable VOC from the referenced standard. Track the amount of product used, using a consistent metric per system. Confirm that each material is within the requirements prescribed for the credit.
  3. Maintain a list of each composite wood and agrifiber product installed in the building interior. Confirm that each product within this system category is within the requirements prescribed for the credit.
  4. Maintain a list of all furniture products installed in the building interior. Confirm that each product within this system category is within the requirements prescribed for the credit.
  5. If you used the budget calculation method, explain why.
Additional questions
  1. The goal of this revision is to provide for a systems approach to addressing materials emissions. How does the presentation of the requirements in the Pilot Credit Library compare to the credits as proposed in EQc4.1-4.6 within LEED 2009?
  2. How did the systems approach to interior materials aid the project? Please explain any barriers to addressing interior materials from a systems perspective.
  3. Please reflect on the usefulness and clarity of the table providing calculations for the system category.
  4. What supplemental guidance would be helpful for project teams pursuing this credit?
Changes
  • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
    Simplified calculation
    Additional requirement for manufacturers to state which threshold of
    TVOCs their product falls under
    Default testing scenario changed from classroom to private office
    Removed VOC content criteria for paints, coatings, adhesives, and sealants
    Revised formaldehyde emission limits from CARB Phase 2 to CARB
    ULEF
    Updated furniture requirements to ANSI/BIFMA M7.1
    Added Healthcare requirements
  • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
    Changed calculation methodology to align to LEED 2009 categories;
    made the second public comment calculation methodology an optional
    budget calculation methodology
    Harmonized ANSI/BIFMA
    Additional VOC content requirements for wet applied products
  • Changes made for 08/01/2013:
    Added to documentation requirements: Provide supporting documentation to confirm that each material is within the requirements prescribed for this credit

Choose four of the following strategies.

  1. For all regularly occupied spaces, use light fixtures with a luminance of less than 2,500cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir.
    Exceptions include wallwash fixtures properly aimed at walls, as specified by manufacturer’s data, indirect uplighting fixtures, provided there is no view down into these uplights from a regularly occupied space above, and any other specific applications (i.e. adjustable fixtures).
  2. For the entire project, use light sources with a CRI of 80 or higher. Exceptions include lamps or fixtures specifically designed to provide colored lighting for effect, site lighting, or other special use.
  3. For 75% of the total connected lighting load, use light sources that have a rated life (or L70 for LED sources) of at least 24,000 hours (at 3-hour per start, if applicable).
  4. Use direct-only overhead lighting for 25% or less of the total connected lighting load for all regularly occupied spaces.
  5. For 90% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 85% for ceilings, 60% for walls, and 25% for floors.
  6. If furniture is included in the scope of work, select furniture finishes to meet the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 45% for work surfaces, and 50% for movable partitions.
  7. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet an average ratio of wall surface illuminance (excluding fenestration) to average work plane (or surface, if defined) illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 60% for walls.
  8. For 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet an average ratio of ceiling illuminance (excluding fenestration) to work surface illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet option E, option F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of 85% for ceilings.
Credit specific

Note: the below submittals are suggestions, alternative forms of documentation or calculation strategies will be accepted.

  1. For strategy A, a list of all light fixtures used in the regularly occupied spaces. For each fixture, provide a description, manufacturer name, and indicate whether the fixture has a luminance of less than 2,500cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir. Also indicate whether there are any fixtures excluded and whether they are an approved exception.
  2. For strategy B, a list of all light sources included in the interior spaces of the project. For each light source, provide a description, light source type, manufacturer or vendor name, and CRI value. Also indicate whether there are any light sources excluded and whether they are an approved exception.
  3. For strategy C,
    1. A list of all light sources included in the project. For each light source, provide a description, light source type, manufacturer or vendor name, total connected lighting load, and rated life value.
    2. Calculation for the percent of connected lighting load that meets rated life criteria.
  4. For strategy D,
    1. A list of all light fixtures used in the regularly occupied spaces. For each fixture, provide a description, manufacturer name, total connected lighting load, and indicate whether the fixture is direct-only overhead lighting.
    2. Calculation for the percent of connected lighting load that is associated with direct-only overhead lighting.
  5. For strategy E,
    1. Indicate whether any regularly occupied spaces are being excluded from the credit requirements and the associated floor area.
    2. A list of all surfaces in the regularly occupied spaces that are being included in the credit requirements. For each surface, provide a description, manufacturer or vendor name, reflectance value and the percent of the overall ceiling area, wall area, or floor area that uses the surface.
    3. Calculation for average surface reflectance for ceiling area, wall area, and floor area. The calculation should be area- weighted, based on the percentages provided in the surface list. Only 1 calculation for each surface type is needed, the calculations do not need to be performed on a space-by-space basis.
    4. Description of methods used to determine reflectance values.
  6. For strategy F,
    1. A list of all work surfaces and moveable partitions in the project.
    2. For each surface, provide a description, manufacturer or vendor name, reflectance value and the percent of the overall work surface area, or overall moveable partition surface area that is attributed to the surface.
    3. Calculation for average surface reflectance for work surfaces, or moveable partitions. The calculation should be area- weighted, based on the percentages provided in the surface list. Only 1 calculation for each surface type is needed, the calculations do not need to be performed on a space-by-space basis.
    4. Description of methods used to determine reflectance values.
  7. For strategy G,
    1. A list that includes representative areas for all regularly occupied spaces in the project. For each area, include an area description, area location(s), work plane description, work plane illuminance value, wall surface illuminance value, and a calculation for work plane illuminance to wall surface illuminance (in the format of 1: X).
    2. Calculation for the average ratio.
    3. Demonstration that the project also meets strategy E, strategy F, or has area-weighted surface reflectance of 60% for walls.
    4. Description of methods used to determine illuminance values.
  8. For strategy H,
    1. A list that includes representative areas for all regularly occupied spaces in the project. For each area, include an area description, area location(s), work plane description, work plane illuminance value, wall surface illuminance value, and a calculation for work plane illuminance to ceiling surface illuminance (in the format of 1: X).
    2. Calculation for the average ratio.
    3. Demonstration that the project also meets strategy E, strategy F, or has area-weighted surface reflectance of 85% for ceilings.
    4. Description of methods used to determine illuminance values.
Additional questions:
  1. Do the criteria associated with quality interior lighting align with your project’s and occupants comfort and productivity needs?
  2. How difficult was it to document this credit? Is there anything that could be changed to make it easier to document?
Changes
  • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
    Added energy efficiency requirement
    Broke out bullet points into hardware and design categories
    Clarified equations
  • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
    Copyedited language
    Added EB: O+M path to the Pilot Library
  • Changes made for 5th Public Comment (01/15/2013):
    Updated with LEED v4 5th Public Comment changes
  • Changes made (04/15/2013):
    Submittals updated to align with v4 language revisions

* This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

Establishment

Option 2. Lighting quality (1 point)

Choose four of the following strategies.

  1. For all regularly occupied spaces, have in place light fixtures with a luminance of less than 2,500cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir.
    Exceptions include wallwash fixtures properly aimed at walls, as specified by manufacturer’s data, indirect uplighting fixtures, provided there is no view down into these uplights from a regularly occupied space above, and any other specific applications (i.e. adjustable fixtures).
  2. For the entire project, have in place light sources with a CRI of 80 or higher. Exceptions include lamps or fixtures specifically designed to provide colored lighting for effect, site lighting, or other special use.
  3. For at least 75% of the total connected lighting load, have in place light sources that have a rated life (or L70 for LED sources) of at least 24,000 hours (at 3-hour per start, if applicable).
  4. Have in place direct-only overhead lighting for 25% or less of the total connected lighting load for all regularly occupied spaces.
  5. For at least 90% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet or exceed the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 85% for ceilings, 60% for walls, and 25% for floors.
  6. Meet or exceed the following thresholds for area-weighted average surface reflectance: 45% for work surfaces and 50% for movable partitions.
  7. For at least 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet ratio of average wall surface illuminance (excluding fenestration) to average work surface illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of at least 60% for walls.
  8. For at least 75% of the regularly occupied floor area, meet ratio of average ceiling illuminance (excluding fenestration) to work surface illuminance that does not exceed 1:10. Must also meet strategy E, strategy F, or demonstrate area-weighted surface reflectance of at least 85% for ceilings.

Performance

None.

Credit specific

Note: the below submittals are suggestions, alternative forms of documentation or calculation strategies will be accepted.

  1. For strategy A, a list of all light fixtures used in the regularly occupied spaces. For each fixture, provide a description, manufacturer name, and indicate whether the fixture has a luminance of less than 2,500cd/m2 between 45 and 90 degrees from nadir. Also indicate whether there are any fixtures excluded and whether they are an approved exception.
  2. For strategy B, a list of all light sources included in the interior spaces of the project. For each light source, provide a description, light source type, manufacturer or vendor name, and CRI value. Also indicate whether there are any light sources excluded and whether they are an approved exception.
  3. For strategy C,
    1. A list of all light sources included in the project. For each light source, provide a description, light source type, manufacturer or vendor name, total connected lighting load, and rated life value.
    2. Calculation for the percent of connected lighting load that meets rated life criteria.
  4. For strategy D,
    1. A list of all light fixtures used in the regularly occupied spaces. For each fixture, provide a description, manufacturer name, total connected lighting load, and indicate whether the fixture is direct-only overhead lighting.
    2. Calculation for the percent of connected lighting load that is associated with direct-only overhead lighting.
  5. For strategy E,
    1. Indicate whether any regularly occupied spaces are being excluded from the credit requirements and the associated floor area.
    2. A list of all surfaces in the regularly occupied spaces that are being included in the credit requirements. For each surface, provide a description, manufacturer or vendor name, reflectance value and the percent of the overall ceiling area, wall area, or floor area that uses the surface.
    3. Calculation for average surface reflectance for ceiling area, wall area, and floor area. The calculation should be area- weighted, based on the percentages provided in the surface list. Only 1 calculation for each surface type is needed, the calculations do not need to be performed on a space-by-space basis.
    4. Description of methods used to determine reflectance values.
  6. For strategy F,
    1. A list of all work surfaces and moveable partitions in the project.
    2. For each surface, provide a description, manufacturer or vendor name, reflectance value and the percent of the overall work surface area, or overall moveable partition surface area that is attributed to the surface.
    3. Calculation for average surface reflectance for work surfaces, or moveable partitions. The calculation should be area- weighted, based on the percentages provided in the surface list. Only 1 calculation for each surface type is needed, the calculations do not need to be performed on a space-by-space basis.
    4. Description of methods used to determine reflectance values.
  7. For strategy G,
    1. A list that includes representative areas for all regularly occupied spaces in the project. For each area, include an area description, area location(s), work plane description, work plane illuminance value, wall surface illuminance value, and a calculation for work plane illuminance to wall surface illuminance (in the format of 1: X).
    2. Calculation for the average ratio.
    3. Demonstration that the project also meets strategy E, strategy F, or has area-weighted surface reflectance of 60% for walls.
    4. Description of methods used to determine illuminance values.
  8. For strategy H,
    1. A list that includes representative areas for all regularly occupied spaces in the project. For each area, include an area description, area location(s), work plane description, work plane illuminance value, wall surface illuminance value, and a calculation for work plane illuminance to ceiling surface illuminance (in the format of 1: X).
    2. Calculation for the average ratio.
    3. Demonstration that the project also meets strategy E, strategy F, or has area-weighted surface reflectance of 85% for ceilings.
    4. Description of methods used to determine illuminance values.
Additional questions:
  1. Do the criteria associated with quality interior lighting align with your project’s and occupants comfort and productivity needs?
  2. How difficult was it to document this credit? Is there anything that could be changed to make it easier to document?
Changes
  • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
    Added energy efficiency requirement
    Broke out bullet points into hardware and design categories
    Clarified equations
  • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
    Copyedited language
    Added EB: O+M path to the Pilot Library
  • Changes made for 5th Public Comment (01/15/2013):
    Updated with LEED v4 5th Public Comment changes
  • Changes made (04/15/2013):
    Submittals updated to align with v4 language revisions

For all occupied spaces, meet the following requirements as applicable to the space:

  • room noise levels
  • sound isolation performance of constructions,
  • limiting reverberation time and reverberant noise buildup
  • paging, masking and sound reinforcement systems

Projects that cannot meet sections of the requirements due to limited scope of work or historic preservation requirements must meet at least 3 of the above sections and submit a detailed description justifying design decisions.

Room noise levels

Room noise levels from building mechanical systems shall fall within the sound level ranges shown in either the 2011 ASHRAE Handbook, HVAC Applications, Chapter 48, Table 1, or the AHRI Standard 885-2008, Table 15, or local equivalent.

Measurements for room sound levels shall be measured using a sound level meter that conforms to ANSI S1.4 for type 1 (precision) or type 2 (general purpose) sound measurement instrumentation, or local equivalent.

Comply with design criteria for HVAC noise levels in regularly occupied spaces resulting from the sound transmission paths listed in Table 6 in the ASHRAE 2011 Applications Handbook or AHRI Standard 885-2008, or local equivalent.

Sound isolation

In lieu of a building code, meet the following composite Sound Transmission Class (STCC)ratings:

As applicable, use the following table to estimate the composite STC rating (STCC) of interior partitions.

Table 1. Maximum composite sound transmission class ratings for adjacent spaces

Adjacency combinations STCC
Residence (within a multifamily residence), hotel or motel room Residence, hotel or motel room 55
Residence, hotel or motel room Common hallway, stairway 50
Residence, hotel or motel room Retail 60
Retail Retail 50
Standard office Standard office 45
Executive office Executive office 50
Conference room Conference room 50
Office, conference room Hallway, stairway 50
Mechanical equipment room Occupied area 60

Limiting reverberation time and reverberant noise buildup

Meet the reverberation time requirements in the following table, adapted from Table 9.1 in the Performance Measurement Protocols for Commercial Buildings2:

Table 2. Reverberation time requirements

Room type Application T60 (sec), at 500 Hz, 1000 Hz, and 2000 Hz
Apartment and condominium < 0.6
Hotel/motel Individual room or suite < 0.6
Meeting or banquet room < 0.8
Office building Executive or private office < 0.6
Conference room < 0.6
Teleconference room < 0.6
Open-plan office without sound masking < 0.8
Open-plan office with sound masking 0.8
Courtroom Unamplified speech < 0.7
Amplified speech < 1.0
Performing arts space Drama theaters, concert and recital halls Varies by application
Laboratories Testing or research with minimal speech communication < 1.0
Extensive phone use and speech communication < 0.6
Church, mosque, synagogue General assembly with critical music program Varies by application
Library   < 1.0
Indoor stadium, gymnasium Gymnasium and natatorium < 2.0
Large-capacity space with speech amplification < 1.5
Classroom < 0.6

Paging, masking and sound reinforcement systems

Sound Reinforcement

  1. All large conference rooms and auditoria seating more than 50 persons shall consider sound reinforcement and AV playback capabilities, depending on their use. If it is determined that these systems are not required, the design team must submit a detailed description justifying their design decisions.
  2. Sound reinforcement system shall achieve a minimum Speech Transmission Index (STI) of 0.60 or a Common Intelligibility Scale (CIS) rating 0.77 at representative points within the area of coverage to provide acceptable intelligibility from the system.
  3. Performance of the system shall achieve:
    • 70 dBA minimum sound level
    • Maintain sound level coverage within +/- 3 dB at the 2000 Hz octave band throughout the space.
  4. Upgraded sound isolation shall be considered for acoustically-sensitive spaces that are adjacent to spaces with sound reinforcement systems.

Masking systems
For projects that use masking systems, meet the following:

  1. Systems shall be designed for levels that do not exceed 48 dBA.
  2. Loudspeaker coverage shall provide uniformity of +/- 2 dBA
  3. Suitable spectra shall be designed to effectively mask speech spectra3.

.

1 The sound isolation ratings are considered the composite sound isolation performance values associated with the demising constructions, whether they are the floor/ceiling or wall partitions. Details such as the ceiling plenum conditions, windows, doors, penetrations through the constructions, etc. shall be addressed to provide this composite sound isolation rating. The values will provide Normal speech privacy (except at corridor walls with doors), assuming a background sound level of at least 30 dBA in the receiving room and “conversational” voice level of 60 dBA at three feet. The values will provide confidential speech privacy if the sum of the composite STC and A-weighted background noise level total is at least 75. For “raised” and “loud” voice levels, add 5 to 10 dBA to the total, respectively.

2 Adapted from ASHRAE (2007d), ASA (2008), ANSI (2002), and CEN (2007)

3 “Masking speech in open-plan offices with simulated ventilation Noise: Noise level and spectral composition Effects on Acoustical Satisfaction”, Veitch, J.A. Bradley, J.S.; Legault, L.M. Norcross, S., and Svec, J.M. IRC – IR – 846, National Resource Council Canada, April 2002.

Credit Specific:

Room noise level calculations (NC, RC(N) or dBA).
Sound isolation assessment (STCC).
Speech privacy analysis.
RT calculations, and Discussion of sound absorbing materials used in the project.
Sound reinforcement or masking system description

Additional Questions
  1. The goal of this credit is to provide the optimal acoustical environment for occupants in a space; how did the sound isolation needs analysis change the design of your space?
  2. Are there parts of the analysis that you opted not to address? If so, why?
Background Information

This pilot credit is based upon the LEED for Schools Enhanced Acoustical Design credit, and has been developed in order to meet the market need for guidance around acoustical design in the office and new construction setting.

Changes:
  • 01/02/2014:
    Added Table 1 and Table 2

Identify activities and building functions that would benefit from the application of ergonomics in the selection of appropriate furnishings, equipment and education.

Consult current ergonomics standards and guidelines relevant to the tasks that will be performed in the building. For computer workstations, these include:

  • BIFMA G1-2002 (to be superseded by BIFMA G1-2011 when approved)
  • ANSI/HFES 100-2007
  • CSA Z412-00 (R2011)

For non-computer workstations these include:

  • Z1004-09, OSHA 3192-05N(2004)
  • OSHA 3182 (revised 2009)

Prior to designing the interior (including lighting, thermal environment, office layout, individual workstation design, furnishings and equipment) consult with and analyze occupant needs. Review potential design options with occupants.

Analyze these occupant needs:

  • User characteristics (age, size, shape, weight, ability/disability, gender)
  • Tasks performed (including relative importance and priority of tasks, frequency, duration)
  • Equipment and materials used along with storage requirements

Demonstrate that key interrelated ergonomic principles1 were incorporated into the interior design that facilitate occupant well-being (health, performance, and satisfaction).

Provide ergonomics education and training to all users upon installation of furniture and equipment.

1Key ergonomic interrelated principles include versatility and flexibility, fit, postural change, worker education and training, and maintainability and adaptability.

Credit specific:
  1. Strategic plan for a comprehensive ergonomics strategy outlining how each item will be achieved
  2. Document the two education sessions
  3. Example follow up survey
Establishment

Develop and implement a comprehensive ergonomics policy that will enhance health and comfort during daily activity for at least 75% of workers. This strategy must include the following four components.

  1. Identify activities and building functions for which addressing ergonomics is both desirable and possible through education and equipment.
    Consult current ergonomics standards and guidelines relevant to the tasks that will be performed in the building. For computer workstations, these include:

    • BIFMA G1-2002 (to be superseded by BIFMA G1-2007 when balloted)
    • ANSI/HFES 100-2007
    • CSA Z412-00 (R2005)

    For non-computer workstations these include:

    • Z1004-09, OSHA 3192-05N(2004)
    • OSHA 3182 (revised 2009)
  2. Define performance goals for the ergonomics strategy, addressing productivity, comfort, and health. Communicate the goals and ergonomics strategy to workers.
    Provide an informal, periodic feedback system to collect anonymous responses and respond to them.

  3. Maintain ongoing office user access to appropriate ergonomics machine, equipment, tools, work-aids (METWAs), furnishings, and accessories and education and education for all full time equivalent office occupants.
    Evaluate METWAs, furnishings, and accessories to ensure they continue to meet the diversity of occupant needs and contribute to on-going risk reduction for work-related musculoskeletal disorders.
    If office users spend 50% or more of their time at computer workstations, address display, computer peripherals (keyboard/mouse), work surface, and chair.
  4. Provide ergonomics education. Offer at least two such opportunities at least one of which must be interactive. Conduct follow up-evaluations. Ergonomics education opportunities include the following:
    • Classroom sessions conducted by a Certified Professional Ergonomist (CPE or CCPE) accredited by the Board of Certification of Ergonomics Professionals (BCEP or CBCEP)
    • Regularly schedule workstation evaluations
    • Access to literature on products and basic information relevant to the office user’s tasks;
    • Interactive Internet-based products (e.g., assessment and training tools)
Performance

Conduct a formal, periodic survey of office user satisfaction. The survey must cover a representative sample of office occupants making up at least 30% of the total occupants.

Track and report the results of the ergonomics strategy, ensure that the performance goals have been met, and identify areas for improvement.

Provide for ongoing occupant comfort by establishing quality criteria for interior lighting within a space.

Credit specific:
  1. Strategic plan for a comprehensive ergonomics strategy outlining how each item will be achieved
  2. Document the two education sessions
  3. Example follow up survey

* This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

Option 4. Street network (1 point)

Locate the project in an area of high intersection density, defined as an area whose existing streets and sidewalks create at least 90 intersections per square mile (35 intersections per square kilometer). When determining the number of intersections, include the following:

  • intersections within a ¼ mile (400 meter) radius of project boundary;
  • streets and sidewalks that are available for general public use and not gated;
  • sidewalk intersections provided they are a unique right of way (i.e., a sidewalk through a city park); and
  • publicly accessible alleys.

Exclude the following:

  • intersections in gated areas, which are not considered available for public use, with the exception of education and health care campuses and military bases where gates are used for security purposes;
  • water bodies and public parks; and
  • intersections leading only to a dead end or cul-de-sac.
Credit specific

To gain credit, submit an aerial map of the project and surrounding area. Create a circle with a ¼ mile radius, and mark each intersection within that radius with the following caveats:

  • All streets and sidewalks that are counted toward the connectivity requirement must be available for general public use and not gated. Gated areas are not considered available for public use, with the exception of education and health care campuses and military bases where gates are used for security purposes.
  • Sidewalk intersections may be counted only if they are a unique and dedicated right of way
  • Publicly accessible alleys may be counted.
  • Intersections leading to cul-de-sacs are not counted.

Credit is earned for projects with an intersection density of at least 90 qualified intersections per square mile.

Example submittal:

Additional questions:
  1. Did you find that the number of intersections near your project was an effective measure of project connectivity to the local community?
  2. If the number of intersections was low, can you identify a reason (rural setting, proximity to a large open space etc.)
  3. Do you think the requirement thresholds should be increased or decreased? Why?
  4. Would you consider your project site to be well connected (i.e., meets the intent of this credit)? Is this reflected in your intersection count?
LEED for Homes Review Process

LEED for Homes projects: When complete, submit documentation here.

Changes:
  • Changes made 11/01/2010:
    Changed Applicable Rating Systems: removed NC, CI, CS, Schools, Retail, Healthcare and EB:O&M, added Homes Mid-Rise
    Added metric for 1 square mile of intersections
    2nd bullet: changed “unique” to “unique and dedicated”
    4th bullet: changed “intersections with” to “intersections leading to”
    Added example submittal graphic
  • Changes made 3/1/2011:
    Changed title from “Open and Connected Community”
    Eliminated higher threshold, and changed the lower threshold from 300 intersections per square mile to 90.
    1st bullet: changed “all weather pathways” to “sidewalks”
  • Changes made 3/1/2012:
    Changed title to Street Network
  • Changes made 1/15/2013:
    Minor edits to align with LEED v4 5th Public Comment version of LT Site Selection – Option 4: Street Network

Meet both of the following requirements:

Bicycle network

Design or locate the project such that the building entrance and/or bicycle storage is within a 200-yard walk distance from at least one of the following:

  1. An existing bicycle network that connects to a school or employment center within 3 miles bicycling distance from the project boundary; or
  2. An existing bicycle network that connects to at least 10 community resources within 2 miles bicycling distance from the project boundary.

If the requirements border the project boundary, a safe, all-weather route must exist between the bicycle network and the project’s bicycle storage and/or main
entrance.

Planned and funded bicycle trails or lanes may be counted if they are funded and designated for completion within the fiscal year that the constructing organization finalizes the plans.

AND
Bicycle Storage

Provide at least one secure, enclosed bicycle storage space per occupant for 25% of all building occupants. Expect 2 persons for a studio or 1-bedroom apartment, with one additional person per additional bedroom.

Bicycle storage areas must be locked, located under roof and easily accessible to residents. For multi-family buildings with more than 10 units, provide informational signage on using the storage facilities. Bicycle storage capacity may not be double counted; storage that is fully allocated to the occupants of non-project facilities cannot also serve project occupants.

A single family dwelling unit with enclosed garage meets the bicycle storage requirement.

LEED for Homes Review Process

LEED for Homes projects: When complete, submit documentation here.

Credit Specific:
  • Provide calculation showing the number of occupants compared to the number of bicycle storage spots
  • Provide map demonstrating that the project complies is within 3 miles of a school or employment center or within 2 miles of 10 community resources, and that the route is bicycle friendly
  • Green rater visually verifies that an adequate number of bicycle storage spots that are located in a locked and under roof area are present
Additional Questions
  • Did the project team meet this credit in more than one way? If so, which options were met, and why did the project team choose to submit one as the primary path for credit achievement?
Changes
  • Changes made 2/18/2011:
    Removed Mid-rise eligibility because a similar credit is available in LEED for Homes Mid-Rise.
  • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
    Removed Option 2: Parking Capacity / Low Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles
    Included pathway for single-family housing
    Included requirements for bicycle network
Case 1. Single family

Complete all of the requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense Specification for Single-Family New Homes.

Case 2: Multi-Family & mid-rise

Meet all of the following:

  • All fixtures and fittings must meet the Water-Efficiency Criteria of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense Specification for Single-Family New Homes
  • Hot Water Delivery System – To minimize water wasted while waiting for hot water, the hot water distribution system shall be field tested to store no more than
    0.5 gallons (1.9 liters) of water in any piping/manifold between the hot water source and any hot water fixture. For projects with central water heating systems that serve multiple units, store no more than 0.5 gallons of water in any piping/manifold between the common hot water line and any hot water fixture.
  • Meet the Outdoor Water-Efficiency Criteria of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense Specification for Single-Family New Homes
  • Meet the performance testing requirements of WaterSense for New Homes, which include field verifying that all faucets and shower heads are performing at or below their rated volume, building water pressure is below 60 psi, no leaks are detectable in the plumbing supply system, and toilets are not leaking
HOMES

Note: Multi-family projects required to meet the Fair Housing Amendments Act (FHAA) (e.g., a building with ≥ 4 residential units and an elevator) may earn points in Option 1 if they have twice the number of accessible units that meet FHAA requirements than what is required by code.

Option 1. Universal design features

Meet all of the following:

  1. Zero-Step Main Entrance: Entrances with no abrupt change in level must provide access to dwelling units and site amenities.
  2. Accessible Doorway: A doorway must have a minimum clear width of open doorway of 32 inches and clear maneuvering space inside and outside the door.
  3. Accessible Passage: An accessible route is a path that is at least 36 inches wide, smooth, as level as possible, and without hazards or obstructions.
  4. Adaptable bathroom: Bathroom must have a minimum 30 inch x 48 inch clear floor space and standard accessible shower and toilet fixtures.
  5. Accessible HVAC and lighting controls: Controls such as thermostats and other heating, air-conditioning, and ventilation mechanisms as well as light switches and electrical outlets must be positioned no less that 15 inches from the floor and no higher than 48 inches with no access obstructions.
  6. A kitchen, dining area, living area, adaptable full bathroom, and bedroom on the accessible level.
AND/OR
Option 2. Open building structural systems

Allow for easy redefining of rooms/floorplans with minimal renovation and material waste. Meet both of the following:

  1. Centralized primary structural elements (such as “clear-span” structural design and partitions)
  2. Flexible ceiling or floor systems (such as suspended ceilings, open-web floor trusses, raised or plenum floors)
AND/OR
Option 3. Organized and accessible MEP systems

Meet one of the following:

  1. Stacked plumbing, electrical and mechanical design. Stacked or adjacent MEP layouts locate functional areas (like bathrooms, kitchens, and laundry areas for plumbing lines) vertically from floor to floor or in shared common walls on the same floor to provide access for installation and repairs, reduce redundant supply and space requirements, and ensure adaptable use of nonMEP spaces
  2. Separation of MEP systems from within exterior walls and primary interior structural members
MID-RISE

Projects required to meet the Fair Housing Amendments Act (FHAA) (e.g., a building with ≥ 4 residential units and an elevator) may earn points in if they have twice the number of accessible units that meet FHAA requirements than what is required by code.

Universal design features

Meet all of the following:

  1. Zero-Step Main Entrance: Entrances with no abrupt change in level must provide access to dwelling units and site amenities.
  2. Accessible Doorway: A doorway must have a minimum clear width of open doorway of 32 inches and clear maneuvering space inside and outside the door.
  3. Accessible Passage: An accessible route is a path that is at least 36 inches wide, smooth, as level as possible, and without hazards or obstructions.
  4. Adaptable bathroom: Bathroom must have a minimum 30 inch x 48 inch clear floor space and standard accessible shower and toilet fixtures.
  5. Accessible HVAC and lighting controls: Controls such as thermostats and other heating, air-conditioning, and ventilation mechanisms as well as light switches and electrical outlets must be positioned no less that 15 inches from the floor and no higher than 48 inches with no access obstructions.
  6. A kitchen, dining area, living area, adaptable full bathroom, and bedroom on the accessible level.
LEED for Homes Review Process

LEED for Homes projects: When complete, submit documentation here.

These requirements only apply to “acoustically sensitive” rooms, such as bedrooms, dining rooms, living rooms, and studies. (“Acoustically insensitive” rooms include bathrooms, kitchens, and hallways.) Projects may also implement the measures throughout the entire home.

Option 1. Prescriptive noise reduction methods.

Meet all of the following requirements:

  1. Mechanical systems must meet the following requirements:
    • Continuous ventilation fans shall have a maximum sound rating of 0.7 sones. Intermittent fans shall have a maximum sound rating of 1.5 sones, unless their maximum rated airflow exceeds 400 cfm. HVAC air handlers and remote-mounted fans are exempted, if the fans are mounted outside the habitable spaces, bathrooms, and hallways, and if there is at least 4 feet of ductwork between the fan and the intake grill.
    • Meet the following best-practice HVAC installation measures:
      • Ducts are securely attached (no loose connections between sections of ductwork).
      • The fan housing is securely anchored.
      • The damper flap closes fully, with no visible airspaces around the flap.
    • For projects that are less than a half a mile away from any significant noise source such as (but not limited to) aircraft over-flights, highways, trains, and industry, exterior assemblies must include:
      • Exterior windows and doors must have a minimum STC rating of 35.
      • All exterior wall penetrations must be sealed with acoustical sealant,
      • and/or otherwise treated for sound control (e.g. lined elbows on vents, lined exterior ducts where feasible).
    • Attached single family homes and multi-family homes must also meet the following:
      • Party walls must have a minimum STC rating of 55.
      • All party wall penetrations must be sealed with acoustical sealant
        • Floor/ceiling assemblies must have a minimum STC and IIC rating of 55.
AND/OR
Option 2. Performance-based compliance requirements

Meet all of the following. The tested levels must be met in the acoustically sensitive room that is considered the worst case condition.

  1. The maximum background noise level in the home or unit due to exterior noise sources cannot exceed 40 dBA, based on the peak hour Leq.
  2. The maximum background noise level in the home or unit due to interior noise sources (HVAC systems, lighting, and other building services operating simultaneously) shall not exceed 40 dBA, based on the peak Leq.
  3. Party walls must have a minimum NIC rating of 50.
  4. Floor-ceiling assemblies between units must have a minimum NIC and FIIC rating of 50.

Ductless systems qualify for this credit.

Case 1. Single family
Option 1: Energy and water
  1. Install an advanced energy monitoring system that meets the following requirements:
    • Meters must be permanently installed,
    • Record at intervals of 1 hour or less
    • Transmit data to the homeowner or occupant at a remote location (e.g, computer, in house display).
    • Separate energy usage information for at least four end uses such as space conditioning, water heating, and major plug loads.
  2. Irrigation Meter. If an automatic in-ground irrigation system is part of the home project and the landscape irrigated area is larger than 1000 square feet, a sub-meter must be installed to monitor all irrigation system components.
AND/OR
Option 2. Building Performance Partnership

Homeowner must enroll in the USGBC Building Performance Partnership (BPP) for all applicable utility accounts, prior to submitting for LEED Certification/

Case 2. Multi-family
Option 1. Energy and water
  1. Install an advanced energy monitoring system for each unit that meets the following requirements:
    • Meters must be permanently installed,
    • Record at intervals of 1 hour or less
    • Transmit data to the homeowner or occupant at a remote location (e.g, computer, in house display).
    • Separate energy usage information for at least four end uses such as space conditioning, water heating, and major plug loads.
  2. Irrigation Meter. If an automatic in-ground irrigation system is part of the home project and the landscape irrigated area is larger than 1000 square feet, a sub-meter must be installed to monitor all irrigation system components.
AND/OR
Option 2. Building Performance Partnership
Path 1: Whole-building master meter

Building owner must enroll in the USGBC Building Performance Partnership (BPP) for all applicable utility accounts, prior to submitting for LEED Certification.

OR
Path 2. Individual unit meters

At least 50% of unit owners or occupants must enroll in the USGBC Building Performance Partnership (BPP) for all applicable utility accounts, prior to submitting for LEED Certification.

Starting in pre-design, and continuing throughout the design phases, identify and execute synergistic opportunities for high performance outcomes across different disciplines and building systems. Use the analyses described below to inform the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR), Basis of Design (BOD), Design Documents, and Construction Documents. Consider opportunities resulting from analyses, at a minimum, in the following three areas:

Energy-related systems
Perform a preliminary “simple box” energy modeling analysis before the completion of Schematic Design that explores how to reduce energy loads in the building and
accomplish other related sustainability goals by questioning default assumptions and testing options for applicable parameters. Assess at least two potential parametric options associated with, at a minimum, each of the following:

  • Programmatic and operational parameters: Assess how multi-functioning spaces, operating schedules, space allotment per person, teleworking, reducing building area, on-going operations and maintenance issues impact project and human performance.
  • Site conditions: Assess how shading, exterior lighting, hardscape, landscaping, and adjacent site conditions impact project and human performance
  • Massing and orientation: Assess how massing and orientation impact HVAC sizing, energy consumption, lighting, and renewable energy opportunities.
  • Basic Envelope Attributes: Assess how insulation values, window-to-wall ratios, glazing characteristics, shading, and window operability impact HVAC sizing, project performance, and human performance
  • Lighting levels: Assess how interior surface reflectance values and lighting levels in occupied spaces impact HVAC sizing, project performance, and human performance.
  • Thermal comfort ranges: Assess how thermal comfort range options impact HVAC sizing, project performance, and human performance.
  • Plug and process load needs: Assess how reducing plug and process loads through programmatic solutions such as equipment and purchasing policies, layout options, etc., impact HVAC sizing, project performance, and human performance.
AND

Water-related systems
Perform a preliminary water budget analysis before the completion of Schematic Design that explores how to reduce potable water loads in the building and accomplish other related sustainability goals by assessing and quantifying the project’s potential non-potable water supply sources and water demand volumes. Assess applicable estimates for, at a minimum, the following:

  • Indoor Water Demand: Assess flow and flush fixture performance case demand volumes, calculated in accordance with WEp Indoor Water Use Reduction.
  • Outdoor Water Demand: Assess landscape irrigation performance case demand volume calculated in accordance with WEc Outdoor Water Use Recusion.
  • Process Water Demand: Assess kitchen, laundry, cooling tower, and other equipment demand volumes, as applicable.
  • Supply Sources: Assess all potential non-potable water supply source volumes, such as on-site rainwater and grey water, municipally supplied nonpotable water, and HVAC equipment condensate.
AND

Cost analysis (related to all above systems)
Discovery: Perform integrative cost-bundling analysis1 that estimates the cost of implementing integrative strategies. Compare bundled design case first costs (associated with primary integrative strategies) with the project’s baseline first cost and operating costs budgets for the same components. This cost-bundling analysis must include, at a minimum, the following:

  • Establish the project’s baseline construction budget using line item first cost estimates
  • Establish the project’s baseline operations budget using line item cost estimates
  • Create a cost-bundling spreadsheet identifying primary bundles of interrelated systems
  • Identify and quantify potential design case first cost impacts (both reductions and increases) associated with each affected component of each primary bundle
  • Identify potential design case operational costs associated with each primary bundle
  • Identify any potential design case cost savings/benefits related to productivity issues associated with each primary bundle, where possible
Credit specific

Complete the LEED v4 Integrative Process Worksheet. Additional guidance can be found in the LEED v4 version of this credit under the guide tab.

Additional Questions

  • How were the requirements of this credit different from the process/planning you’ve completed on previous projects?
  • Which typical project team members were critical to this process?  Did the project team engage members they otherwise would not have?
  • How did work completed for the requirements change what the project team would have otherwise done?
  • What parts of the process of meeting the requirements (if any) are similar to what the project team would have otherwise done?
  • What resources, if any, did the project team use to understand an integrative process?
  • What was the most challenging aspect of meeting the credit requirements?
Changes
  • 5/15/2014:
    replaced submittal requirements with LEED v4 documentation requirements

Starting in pre-design, and continuing throughout the design phases, identify and execute synergistic opportunities for high performance outcomes across different
disciplines and building systems. Use the analyses described below to inform the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR), Basis of Design (BOD), Design Documents, and Construction Documents. Consider opportunities resulting from analyses, at a minimum, in the following two areas:

Site selection
Prior to site selection, perform an analysis of project goals to aid in identifying and selecting a building site for the project’s tenant improvement that will provide the
most opportunities and fewest barriers for the Interior Design and Construction project. Assess at least two potential site location/base building options that take into consideration, at a minimum, each of the following:

  • Building Site Attributes: Assess base building’s location and site design characteristics
  • Transportation Impacts: Assess the tenant occupants’ transportation needs for commuting to and from the site, including criteria for convenient access to alternative transportation most beneficial to the occupants’ destinations
  • Building Features: Assess base building’s envelope, mechanical/electrical systems that will affect tenant space (such as controls, HVAC, plumbing fixtures, renewable energy supply, etc.), adaptability to future needs, and resilience in the event of disaster or infrastructure failure;/li>
  • Occupant Well-Being Capability: Assess base building’s capability for providing daylight and views, indoor air quality, and other applicable Indoor Environmental Quality characteristics.
AND

Commit to the establishment and use of ongoing feedback mechanisms that provide information about tenant space performance and occupant satisfaction.

AND

Energy-related systems
Discovery: Perform a preliminary energy analysis before the completion of Schematic Design that explores how to reduce energy loads for the interior design project and accomplish other related sustainability goals by questioning default assumptions and testing options for applicable parameters. Assess at least two potential options associated with each of the following in terms of project and human performance:

  • Programmatic and operational parameters: Multi-functioning spaces, operating schedules, space allotment per person, teleworking, reducing building area, on-going operations and maintenance issues.
  • Basic Envelope Attributes: Insulation values, window-to-wall ratios, glazing characteristics, shading, and window operability.
  • Lighting levels: Interior surface reflectance values and lighting levels in occupied spaces.
  • Thermal comfort ranges.
  • Plug and process load needs: Reducing plug and process loads through programmatic solutions such as equipment and purchasing policies, or layout options.
AND

Comply with the requirements of one of the options below.

Option 1. Water-related systems

Discovery: Perform a preliminary water budget analysis before the completion of Schematic Design that explores how to reduce potable water loads for the interior design project and accomplish other related sustainability goals by assessing and quantifying the project’s potential non-potable water supply sources and water demand volumes. Assess applicable estimates for the following:

  • Fixture and Fitting Water Demand: Assess flow and flush fixture performance case demand volumes, calculated in accordance with WEp1 Water Use Reduction.
  • Process Water Demand: Assess kitchen, laundry, cooling tower, and other equipment demand volumes, as applicable.
  • Supply Sources: Assess all potential non-potable water supply source volumes, such as on-site rainwater and grey water, municipally supplied nonpotable water, and HVAC equipment condensate.
Option 2. Cost analysis (related to all above systems)

Discovery: Perform integrative cost-bundling analysis1 that estimates the cost of implementing integrative strategies. Compare bundled design case first costs (associated with primary integrative strategies) with the project’s baseline first cost and operating costs budgets for the same components. This cost-bundling analysis must include, at a minimum, the following:

  • Establish the project’s baseline construction budget using line item first cost estimates
  • Establish the project’s baseline operations budget using line item cost estimates
  • Create a cost-bundling spreadsheet identifying primary bundles of interrelated systems
  • Identify and quantify potential design case first cost impacts (both reductions and increases) associated with each affected component of each primary bundle
  • Identify potential design case operational costs associated with each primary bundle
  • Identify any potential design case cost savings/benefits related to productivity issues associated with each primary bundle, where possible
Credit specific

Commercial Interiors, Retail – CI
Site Selection Implementation: Document how the above analysis informed selection of a building site for the project’s tenant improvement and informed the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of Design. Demonstrate how the analysis informed the site selection for the interior design project, relative to, but not limited to, the following:

  • Suitability of the base building for meeting project goals relative to the building’s site attributes
  • Suitability of the base building site location for meeting daily occupant commuting needs
  • Suitability of the base building’s mechanical/electrical systems for meeting project goals
  • Capability of the tenant space for meeting the project’s goals related to Indoor Environmental Quality and occupant well-being
  • Other systems

Provide documentation of methods planned to gather feedback on tenant occupant satisfaction.
Energy Systems Implementation: Document how the above analysis informed interior design decisions in the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of Design.  Demonstrate how the analysis informed the interior design of the project, as applicable:

  • Building envelope and façade conditions
  • Elimination and/or significant down-sizing of building systems such as those related to HVAC, lighting, controls, exterior materials, interior finishes,  and functional  program elements.
  • Methods planned to gather feedback on energy performance, occupant performance, and efficiency of energy-related systems during operations.
  • Other systems

Water Systems Implementation: Document how the above analysis informed interior design decisions in the project’s Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of Design. Demonstrate how at least one on-site non-potable water supply source was utilized in cascading ways to reduce the burden on municipal supply and/or wastewater treatment systems by contributing supply volumes to the water demand components listed above. Demonstrate how the analysis informed the interior design and systems affected by the project, as applicable:

  • Plumbing systems
  • Sewage conveyance and/or on-site treatment systems
  • Process water systems
  • Methods planned to gather feedback on water performance and efficiency of water-related systems during operations
  • Other systems

Cost Analysis Implementation: Document how the above analysis was utilized to reconcile the integrative design case construction and operations budgets (on a whole-tenant-space basis, instead of comparing solely individual line item costs) with the baseline construction and operations budgets. Describe how first cost savings associated with any applicable systems offset first cost increases associated with other related systems; include a description of any potential operating costs savings and/or productivity increases identified by the analyses.
1 This requires a holistic cost analysis that first identifies all components affected by each major integrative strategy, then groups the costs associated with all such affected components into integrative combinations, or "bundles", instead of estimating solely the individual line item cost for each component or system individually.

Additional Questions

  • How were the requirements of this credit different from the process/planning you’ve completed on previous projects?
  • Which typical project team members were critical to this process?  Did the project team engage members they otherwise would not have?
  • How did work completed for the requirements change what the project team would have otherwise done?
  • What parts of the process of meeting the requirements (if any) are similar to what the project team would have otherwise done?
  • What resources, if any, did the project team use to understand an integrative process?
  • What was the most challenging aspect of meeting the credit requirements?

Implement resource recovery and reuse of one or both of the following for up to 1 point:

Resource recovery type Points
nutrients (nitrogen and/or phosphorous) 1
organic carbon loading from building occupants 1 (2nd point not available)

This prerequisite is available for pilot testing by the following LEED rating systems and building types:

  • New Construction

    • Office
    • Multi-family Residential
    • Lodging
    • Warehouses
  • Retail NC (excluding restaurants)
  • Schools (excluding laboratories within school buildings)
  • Commercial Interiors
  • Retail CI (excluding restaurants)
  • Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance
    • Office
    • Retail (excluding restaurants)
    • Multi-family Residential
    • Lodging
    • Schools (excluding laboratories within school buildings)
    • Warehouses

Project types not listed above that are interested in pursuing this path, should contact USGBC before registration. See below for more information.

Note: The following Pilot Credit modifications apply to this prerequisite:
  • Introductory phone call between project teams pursuing this path and GBCI reviewers.
  • Project teams pursuing this pilot prerequisite will be required to fulfill all prerequisite requirements. Unlike with other pilot credits, documenting that a pilot credit is in need of major revision and in unachievable in its current form will not demonstrate compliance for IEQp1.
  • No ID points will be awarded.
  • If a project team registers and submits documentation noting that space in the project fails testing (chemical or perceived), corrective action must be taken until the project meets all requirements; it will not be acceptable to pursue the Ventilation Rate Procedure in IEQp1 once evidence of not meeting the pilot requirements is submitted. If, however, a project team decides that this path is too costly or otherwise onerous prior to submission, they may go back and use the traditional IEQp1 path.
  • BD+C and ID+C projects will still need to meet local code requirements for ventilation if they differ from the IAQP.
BD+C, ID+C

Meet the minimum requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, Sections 4 through 7, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (with errata). Determine the minimum outdoor air intake flow for mechanical ventilation systems using the In-door Air Quality Procedure, or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent. Combining the IAQP and VRP is not an acceptable means of compliance with this pilot prerequisite.
Prohibit smoking in the building.
Meet the following requirements for ventilation systems designed in accordance with Section 6.3 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedure:

  1. Contaminant Sources. Identify the outdoor sources, indoor sources, and the expected emission rate for each of the contaminants and mixtures of concern listed in Table 1. Additionally, confirm that the top 10 contaminants by concentration in the building, as identified by mass spectrograph analysis, are included in Table 1. If they are not already included in Table 1, list them.
  2. Contaminant Concentration. Refer to Table 1 for maximum allowable concentration limits for each contaminant of concern.
  3. Perceived Indoor Air Quality. At least 80% of observers or occupants must determine the perceived indoor air quality to be “acceptable” using a Subjective Evaluation.
  4. Design Approach.
    1. Use mass balance analysis. Determine minimum outdoor airflow rates per steady-state mass-balance in Appendix D of the standard.
    2. Project teams using a similar zone as allowed in ASHRAE 62.1, must demonstrate that the similar space selected also complies with all requirements of this prerequisite.
    3. If non-dilution air cleaning technology is utilized, use air cleaning technology consisting of sorptive active agents, in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 145.2-2011, Laboratory Test Method for Assessing the Performance of Gas-Phase Air-Cleaning Systems: Air Cleaning Devices. Electronic air cleaning technology cannot be used.
  5. Air Testing. Conduct contaminant-level testing for each of the contaminants of concern as follows:
    1. Each contaminant of concern shall be measured using the test methods in Table 1. If the top 10 contaminant concentrations are not listed in Table 1, separately mitigate these contaminants or provide a ruling by a cognizant health body that they have no known adverse health impact. Testing is to be completed during time of anticipated peak contaminant loading by an appropriately accredited professional. Use current versions of ASTM standard methods or ISO methods. The number of sampling locations depends on the size of the building and number of ventilation systems, but must include the entire building and all representative space uses.
    2. All measurements within each location shall demonstrate compliance with the maximum allowable concentration limits per Table 1. For each sampling point where the concentration exceeds the limit, take corrective action and retest for the noncompliant contaminants as the sampling points. Repeat until all requirements are met.
    3. Provide testing frequency as follows:
      • After construction and before occupancy with all furniture installed and with all finishes applied. Conduct all measurements with the building ventilation system started at the normal daily start time and operated at the minimum outdoor airflow rate for the occupied mode throughout the test.
      • After complete occupancy of the building within the first year of full occupancy.
    4. For Major Renovation projects, confirm complete implementation of maintenance plans for the following contaminants or document status of “no further remediation” required:
      • Asbestos Containing Materials (ACMs)
      • Lead
      • Radon
      • Mold
  6. Subjective Evaluation. Complete the following tasks:
    1. Prior to occupancy, select a panel of 20 observers to render perceived observations about the quality of the indoor air at a representative area of each space type. Panel members are to be non-smokers, without medically diagnosed odor sensing impairments, or chemical sensitivities, ages 18 to 55. Observers are to render an opinion within 15 seconds of entering the test space as to whether the air is "acceptable" and again at 6 minutes.
    2. Post-occupancy, distribute a seven-point scale questionnaire to at least 30% of the space/building occupants, as described in IEQ Credit 7.2: Thermal Comfort - Verification. The questionnaire is to be designed to address perceived indoor air quality particularly with a focus on odors and irritation responses.
    3. Either in conjunction with the panel testing, or, alternatively, as part of the post-occupancy survey, observers/occupants should render an opinion after spending a minimum of 30 continuous minutes within the space.
Table 1.

Contaminant Compound (CAS#) Concentration Limit
(µg/m3)
Test Method
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 140 ISO 16017-1, 2;
ISO 16000-3, 6;
ASTM D6345-10
Benzene 71-43-2 60
Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 800
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 40
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 1000
Chloroform 67-66-3 300
Dichlorobenzene (1,4-) 106-46-7 800
Dichloroethylene (1,1) 75-35-4 70
Dimethylformamide (N,N-) 68-12-2 80
Dioxane (1,4-) 123-91-1 3000
Epichlorohydrin 106-89-8 3
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 2000
Ethylene glycol 107-21-1 400
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether 110-80-5 70
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate 111-15-9 300
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether 109-86-4 60
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate 110-49-6 90
Formaldehyde 50-00-0 33 BS-ISO 16000-3, 4; ASTM D5197;
BS ISO 16000-4
Hexane (n-) 110-54-3 7000 ISO 16017-1, 2;
ISO 16000-3, 6;
ASTM D6345-10
Isophorone 78-59-1 2000
Isopropanol 67-63-00 7000
Methyl chloroform 71-55-6 1000
Methylene chloride 75-09-2 400
Methyl t-butyl ether 1634-04-4 8000
Naphthalene 91-20-3 9
Phenol 108-95-2 200
Propylene glycol monomethyl ether 107-98-2 7000
Styrene 100-42-5 900
Tetrachloroethylene 127-18-4 35
Toluene 108-88-3 300
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 600
Vinyl acetate 108-05-4 200
Xylenes-total 108-38-3, 95-47-6, and 106-42-3 700
Inorganics
Carbon Monoxide 9 ISO 4224
Ozone 147 (0.075 ppm) ISO 13964; ASTM D5149-02
Particulate Matter PM2.5 15 ISO 7708
Ammonia 200 NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods
Carbon Dioxide 700 above outdoor ppm EPA compendium infared

BD+C specific:
  1. Provide local code calculations, if different than calculation performed for the IAQP (Optional).
Credit Specific:
  1. Provide a design narrative describing the approach used to comply with the IAQ Procedure for the project building. If applicable, document which systems are utilizing the Ventilation Rate Procedure or Natural Ventilation Procedure Method and not the IAQ Procedure. Document the status of any required maintenance plans or a status of no further remediation required for ACMs, lead, radon, and mold. Lastly, include a milestone timeline for implementation of the IAQ Performance Method at the project building listing dates of all tests, corrective actions, and date of compliance.
  2. Complete the IAQ Procedure Calculator. The calculator includes the mass balance calculations used to determine predicted contaminant concentrations and a table for comparing predicted concentrations to actual concentrations from the contaminant-level testing. Additionally, list the top ten (10) contaminants by concentration as identified through mass spectrograph analysis.
    For any contaminants not listed in Table 1 include:

    1. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Number for the contaminant, if available
    2. Exposure limit and cognizant health authority referenced for that limit
  3. Provide a copy of all test results used for compliance including an executive sum-mary by the appropriately accredited professional explaining the testing procedures, confirmation of compliance with HERS or APPA sampling methods as appropriate, specific laboratory test results, and a table of corrective actions required to address non-compliant results.
  4. Provide a narrative of the Perceived Indoor Air Quality analysis including an executive summary explaining the results and a table of corrective actions required to address non-compliant results.
  5. For non-dilution air cleaning technology provide the type of air cleaning products used and the performance data as specified in ASHRAE Standard 145.2. Product removal efficiency shall be reported for the test challenge surrogate gases listed in the table below for the four classes of gases likely to be present in the building. However, if the chemical contaminant mixture in the building is known to include another challenge gas as found in Table 6.1.4.1 of the ASHRAE Std. 142.2, then the appropriate performance data for the challenge gas selected should be provided.
    Provide a preventative maintenance plan for maintaining the non-dilution air cleaning products. Plan shall include the estimated life of the products and any strategy to be used for determining product change out frequency (e.g. remaining life analysis of sorptive agent media using carbon activity and/or remaining concentration of chemical impregnation via titrimetry).

Surrogate Test Challenge Gases
Acid Gases
Sulfur Dioxide CAS # 7446-09-5
Aldehydes
Formaldehyde CAS # 50-00-0
Basic Gases
Ammonia CAS # 7664-41-7
Oxidizing Gases
Ozone CAS # 10028-15-6
VOCs
Toluene CAS #108-88-3

Additional questions
  • Would the team apply this method to another building in the future? Why/why not?
  • How did the cost of this method compare to the cost of the Ventilation Rate Procedure?
Background Information

Subjective evaluation - Panel

Panel participants may be regular occupants of the project building, visitors to the build-ing (i.e. customers of a retail establishment), or individuals with no connection to the project building. Composition of the panel in this regard is at the discretion of the project team.

Responses are to be collected via anonymous methods either written or electronic. The Perceived Indoor Air Quality test is considered “passing” if 80% or more of the panel renders the space “acceptable” at each interval. If less than 80% of the panel renders the space “acceptable”, appropriate corrective actions must be implemented to correct the deficiency. Corrective actions must be implemented within six (6) months of the con-clusion of the panel observations.
Subjective evaluation - Questionnaire

The questionnaire is to be designed to address perceived air quality particularly focusing on odors and irritation responses. The responses shall be tabulated. Respondent answers of -1, -2, or -3 on the seven-point scale will be considered as dissatisfied. If more than 20% of respondents are dissatisfied, appropriate corrective actions must be implemented during the performance period.

For EB: O+M projects, at least one occupant survey must be conducted during each monitoring period.

Space sampling for testing

Randomly select spaces to be tested, ensuring that each occupiable space type is adequately represented. Utilize HERS sampling methodologies for multi-family and lodging projects or APPA sampling methodologies for offices, retail, schools, warehouses, and existing buildings.

  1. Minimum area and space counts noted in the applicable sampling methodology MUST be met.

    1. For HERS sampling procedures, randomly select one in seven (1 in 7) substan-tially similar spaces. Each sample group would consist of identical spaces, one out of every seven of which are to be tested. A minimum of three tests must be conducted in each sample group.
    2. For APPA, randomly select locations totaling at least 10% of the gross floor area of the building and 10% of the total count of substantially similar spaces provided at least five (5) spaces of each space type are included. For any space types with less than five (5) spaces, include all spaces of that type.
  2. Note: different occupiable space types may be combined into common groups if the contaminants and mixtures of concern within those space types are expected to be the same with similar emission rates and the spaces are served by the same ventilation system.

For purposes of determining how many test locations are required, the following shall govern:

  1. Testing must occur in at least one location per ventilation system, per occupiable space type. The location(s) selected for testing must represent the worst-case zone(s) where the highest concentrations of contaminants of concern are likely to occur.

    1. For offices, retail, schools, lodging, multi-family residential, and existing buildings, testing must occur within areas no larger than 5,000 square feet. For warehouses or large open spaces within other building types (i.e. ballrooms in lodging, gymnasiums in schools, etc.) a limit of 50,000 square feet may be used. If there is evidence that the air within the space is well-mixed and sources of contaminants of concern are uniform, project teams may test a single location within that space. Evidence would consist of one of following:

      1. Engineering verification of HVAC system with uniform ventilation distribution, and uniform source of contaminants within that space.
      2. Tracer gas analysis showing uniform air distribution, and initial contaminant measurements showing uniform levels of contaminants of concern.
    2. Real-time sensors may be used to identify the worst-case zones for contaminants of concern; however, final testing results must be measured using the protocols below. Real-time sensor testing is not acceptable for final testing results.
    3. Locations selected may be served by more than one ventilation system provided that each ventilation system serving the location is designed in accordance with Section 6.3.
Additional Resources
  1. Reference to CHiPS database of contaminant generation rates
  2. Spreadsheet Calculator for compliance purposes
  3. Flow chart of compliance steps
  4. Example Surveys
  5. CEC/LBNL report, “Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for “Big Box” stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios”. It is available here

This prerequisite is available for pilot testing by the following LEED rating systems and building types:

  • New Construction

    • Office
    • Multi-family Residential
    • Lodging
    • Warehouses
  • Retail NC (excluding restaurants)
  • Schools (excluding laboratories within school buildings)
  • Commercial Interiors
  • Retail CI (excluding restaurants)
  • Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance
    • Office
    • Retail (excluding restaurants)
    • Multi-family Residential
    • Lodging
    • Schools (excluding laboratories within school buildings)
    • Warehouses

Project types not listed above that are interested in pursuing this path, should contact USGBC before registration. See below for more information.

Note: The following Pilot Credit modifications apply to this prerequisite:
  • Introductory phone call between project teams pursuing this path and GBCI reviewers.
  • Project teams pursuing this pilot prerequisite will be required to fulfill all prerequisite requirements. Unlike with other pilot credits, documenting that a pilot credit is in need of major revision and in unachievable in its current form will not demonstrate compliance for IEQp1.
  • No ID points will be awarded.
  • If a project team registers and submits documentation noting that space in the project fails testing (chemical or perceived), corrective action must be taken until the project meets all requirements; it will not be acceptable to pursue the Ventilation Rate Procedure in IEQp1 once evidence of not meeting the pilot requirements is submitted. If, however, a project team decides that this path is too costly or otherwise onerous prior to submission, they may go back and use the traditional IEQp1 path.
  • BD+C and ID+C projects will still need to meet local code requirements for ventilation if they differ from the IAQP.

Meet the minimum requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, Sections 4 through 6, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (with errata). Determine the minimum outdoor air intake flow for mechanical ventilation systems using the In-door Air Quality Procedure, or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

Combining the IAQP and VRP is not an acceptable means of compliance with this pilot prerequisite.

Prohibit smoking in the building.

Meet the following requirements for ventilation systems designed in accordance with Section 6.3 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedure:

  1. Contaminant Sources. Identify the outdoor sources, indoor sources, and the expected emission rate for each of the contaminants and mixtures of concern listed in Table 1. Additionally, confirm that the top 10 contaminants by concentration in the building, as identified by mass spectrograph analysis, are included in Table 1. If they are not already included in Table 1, list them.
  2. Contaminant Concentration. Refer to Table 1 for maximum allowable concentration limits for each contaminant of concern.
  3. Perceived Indoor Air Quality. At least 80% of observers or occupants must determine the perceived indoor air quality to be “acceptable” using a Subjective Evaluation.
  4. Design Approach. If adjustments will be made to the outdoor air flow rate, use mass balance analysis. Determine minimum outdoor airflow rates per steady-state mass-balance in Appendix D of the standard. Measure system level airflow rates before and after modifications are made.
  5. Non-Dilution Air Cleaning Technology. If non-dilution air cleaning technol-ogy is utilized, use air cleaning technology consisting of sorptive active agents, in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 145.2-2011, Laboratory Test Method for Assessing the Performance of Gas-Phase Air-Cleaning Systems: Air Cleaning Devices. If electronic air cleaning technology is preexisting, continuous ozone monitoring shall be provided. Electronic air cleaning cannot be used as a means of chemical contaminant control.
  6. Air Testing. Conduct contaminant-level testing for each of the contaminants of concern as follows:
    1. Each contaminant of concern shall be measured using the test methods in Table 1. If the top 10 contaminant concentrations are not listed in Table 1, separately mitigate these contaminants or provide a ruling by a cognizant health body that they have no known adverse health impact. Testing is to be completed during time of anticipated peak contaminant loading by an appropriately accredited professional. Use current versions of ASTM standard methods or ISO methods. The number of sampling locations depends on the size of the building and number of ventilation systems, but must include the entire building and all representative space uses.
    2. All measurements within each location shall demonstrate compliance with the maximum allowable concentration limits per Table 1. For each sampling point where the concentration exceeds the limit, take corrective action and retest for the noncompliant contaminants as the sampling points. Repeat until all requirements are met.
    3. Provide testing frequency as follows:
      • For initial certification, the testing must occur within the performance period.
      • For recertification, the testing must occur no less frequently than every two years. Project teams may test more frequently at their discretion.
      • Construction projects within an existing building must comply with the requirements under this prerequisite for ID+C projects.
      • Any adjustments to outside air volumes required to comply with the maximum allowable concentration limits must be implemented within the performance period. Outside air measurements at the affected air handling units must confirm the adjustments.
    4. Confirm complete implementation of maintenance plans for the following contaminants or document status of “no further remediation” required:
      • Asbestos Containing Materials (ACMs)
      • Lead
      • Radon
      • Mold
  7. Subjective Evaluation. Distribute a seven-point scale questionnaire to at least 30% of the space/building occupants as described in IEQ Credit 2.1 Occupant Comfort – Occupant Survey. The questionnaire is to be designed to address perceived air quality particularly focusing on odors and irritation responses.
  8. Maintenance Program. Implement and maintain an HVAC system maintenance program to ensure the proper operations and maintenance of HVAC components as they relate to outdoor air introduction and exhaust. Include any non-dilution methods used.
  9. System Testing. Test and maintain operation of all building exhaust systems, including bathroom, kitchen and parking exhaust systems.
Table 1.

Contaminant Compound (CAS#) Concentration Limit
(µg/m3)
Test Method
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 140 ISO 16017-1, 2;
ISO 16000-3, 6;
ASTM D6345-10
Benzene 71-43-2 60
Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 800
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 40
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 1000
Chloroform 67-66-3 300
Dichlorobenzene (1,4-) 106-46-7 800
Dichloroethylene (1,1) 75-35-4 70
Dimethylformamide (N,N-) 68-12-2 80
Dioxane (1,4-) 123-91-1 3000
Epichlorohydrin 106-89-8 3
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 2000
Ethylene glycol 107-21-1 400
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether 110-80-5 70
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate 111-15-9 300
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether 109-86-4 60
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate 110-49-6 90
Formaldehyde 50-00-0 33 BS-ISO 16000-3, 4; ASTM D5197;
BS ISO 16000-4
Hexane (n-) 110-54-3 7000 ISO 16017-1, 2;
ISO 16000-3, 6;
ASTM D6345-10
Isophorone 78-59-1 2000
Isopropanol 67-63-00 7000
Methyl chloroform 71-55-6 1000
Methylene chloride 75-09-2 400
Methyl t-butyl ether 1634-04-4 8000
Naphthalene 91-20-3 9
Phenol 108-95-2 200
Propylene glycol monomethyl ether 107-98-2 7000
Styrene 100-42-5 900
Tetrachloroethylene 127-18-4 35
Toluene 108-88-3 300
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 600
Vinyl acetate 108-05-4 200
Xylenes-total 108-38-3, 95-47-6, and 106-42-3 700
Inorganics
Carbon Monoxide 9 ISO 4224
Ozone 147 (0.075 ppm) ISO 13964; ASTM D5149-02
Particulate Matter PM2.5 15 ISO 7708
Ammonia 200 NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods
Carbon Dioxide 700 above outdoor ppm EPA compendium infared

EBOM specific:

In addition to the above, meet the following additional requirements:

Establishment
  1. Provide a copy of the building maintenance plan implementing a regular IAQ Performance Method compliant with this Pilot Prerequisite. Describe the ventilation maintenance program, including a description of the periodic checks and scheduled maintenance performed, and whether the checks are manual, based on a building automation system, or both.
  2. Confirm that the project team has performed or overseen tests in all project building exhaust systems during the performance period to verify proper function.
Performance period
  1. Documentation provided must confirm that required performance period miles-tones have been completed within the stated performance period for the project building.
  2. If adjustments are made to the outdoor air flow, provide a table listing system level air flow rates before and after adjustments are made.
Additional questions
  • Would the team apply this method to another building in the future? Why/why not?
  • How did the cost of this method compare to the cost of the Ventilation Rate Procedure?
Background Information

Subjective evaluation - Panel

Panel participants may be regular occupants of the project building, visitors to the build-ing (i.e. customers of a retail establishment), or individuals with no connection to the project building. Composition of the panel in this regard is at the discretion of the project team.

Responses are to be collected via anonymous methods either written or electronic. The Perceived Indoor Air Quality test is considered “passing” if 80% or more of the panel renders the space “acceptable” at each interval. If less than 80% of the panel renders the space “acceptable”, appropriate corrective actions must be implemented to correct the deficiency. Corrective actions must be implemented within six (6) months of the con-clusion of the panel observations.
Subjective evaluation - Questionnaire

The questionnaire is to be designed to address perceived air quality particularly focusing on odors and irritation responses. The responses shall be tabulated. Respondent answers of -1, -2, or -3 on the seven-point scale will be considered as dissatisfied. If more than 20% of respondents are dissatisfied, appropriate corrective actions must be implemented during the performance period.

For EB: O+M projects, at least one occupant survey must be conducted during each monitoring period.

Space sampling for testing

Randomly select spaces to be tested, ensuring that each occupiable space type is adequately represented. Utilize HERS sampling methodologies for multi-family and lodging projects or APPA sampling methodologies for offices, retail, schools, warehouses, and existing buildings.

  1. Minimum area and space counts noted in the applicable sampling methodology MUST be met.

    1. For HERS sampling procedures, randomly select one in seven (1 in 7) substan-tially similar spaces. Each sample group would consist of identical spaces, one out of every seven of which are to be tested. A minimum of three tests must be conducted in each sample group.
    2. For APPA, randomly select locations totaling at least 10% of the gross floor area of the building and 10% of the total count of substantially similar spaces provided at least five (5) spaces of each space type are included. For any space types with less than five (5) spaces, include all spaces of that type.
  2. Note: different occupiable space types may be combined into common groups if the contaminants and mixtures of concern within those space types are expected to be the same with similar emission rates and the spaces are served by the same ventilation system.

For purposes of determining how many test locations are required, the following shall govern:

  1. Testing must occur in at least one location per ventilation system, per occupiable space type. The location(s) selected for testing must represent the worst-case zone(s) where the highest concentrations of contaminants of concern are likely to occur.

    1. For offices, retail, schools, lodging, multi-family residential, and existing buildings, testing must occur within areas no larger than 5,000 square feet. For warehouses or large open spaces within other building types (i.e. ballrooms in lodging, gymnasiums in schools, etc.) a limit of 50,000 square feet may be used. If there is evidence that the air within the space is well-mixed and sources of contaminants of concern are uniform, project teams may test a single location within that space. Evidence would consist of one of following:

      1. Engineering verification of HVAC system with uniform ventilation distribution, and uniform source of contaminants within that space.
      2. Tracer gas analysis showing uniform air distribution, and initial contaminant measurements showing uniform levels of contaminants of concern.
    2. Real-time sensors may be used to identify the worst-case zones for contaminants of concern; however, final testing results must be measured using the protocols below. Real-time sensor testing is not acceptable for final testing results.
    3. Locations selected may be served by more than one ventilation system provided that each ventilation system serving the location is designed in accordance with Section 6.3.
Additional Resources
  1. Reference to CHiPS database of contaminant generation rates
  2. Spreadsheet Calculator for compliance purposes
  3. Flow chart of compliance steps
  4. Example Surveys
  5. CEC/LBNL report, “Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for “Big Box” stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios”. It is available here
Establishment

Comply with the Facade Monitoring Plan requirements, one of the Interior Lighting options, and one of the Exterior Lighting options below.

Façade monitoring plan requirements

Develop a three-year building facade monitoring plan to routinely monitor the effectiveness of the building design in preventing bird collisions. Include methods to identify and document locations of the building where repeated bird strikes occur, the number of collisions, the date, the approximate time (if known), and features that may be contributing to collisions. The plan should also provide a process for corrective action. Use the monitoring plan as the baseline for the measures implemented during the performance period.

AND

Interior Lighting Requirements

Develop a lighting design strategy to effectively eliminate or reduce light trespass from the building. The lighting in all spaces with a direct line of sight to exterior fenestration shall meet at least one of these two options:

Exterior lighting requirements

Develop a lighting design strategy to effectively reduce or eliminate light trespass from exterior fixtures. Meet the exterior and garage lighting power density and controls requirements in sections 9.4.1.3, 9.4.1.7, 9.4.3, of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1- 2010 (with errata but without addenda).

Performance

Implement the façade monitoring plan for a period of three years. If results of the monitoring plan indicate that areas of the building receive multiple collisions, consider implementing temporary and/or permanent retrofits to the building façade.

Credit Specific

Building Façade

  • If all materials on the building have a Threat Factor of 15 or below and the project did not perform the calculations, submit a narrative describing why the materials, and building in general, are “bird-friendly.” This includes a material list and supporting data.
  • A completed Bird Collision Threat Rating spreadsheet.
  • Plan(s) and/or elevation(s) depicting the location of all materials and shading/screening devices used to comply with this credit
  • Applicable specification details on all materials and shading/screening devices used to comply with this credit

Interior Lighting

Option 1:

  • A copy of the building operations guidelines text that stipulates that all interior lighting must be turned off by the appropriate nighttime personnel after hours when the space is unoccupied.

Option 2:

  • Narrative, and drawings showing control locations, describing the lighting controls used on the interior lighting, the sequence of operation and how these controls comply with this credit and section 9 of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010

Exterior Lighting

Option 1:

  • A photometric report of those luminaires demonstrating that no light is emitted above 90 degrees from straight down in their final installed position(s).
  • Narrative, and drawings showing control locations, describing the lighting controls used on the exterior lighting, the sequence of operation and how these controls comply with this credit.

Option 2:

  • All submittals required for the LEED for New Construction SS Credit, Light Pollution Reduction.

Post-Construction Monitoring Plan
ALL PROJECTS

  • A copy of the post-construction monitoring plan
AND

EBOM PROJECTS

  • Provide records of all collisions during the Performance Period. Include the location, date, and approximate time of day for each collision.
  • Plan(s) and/or elevation(s) depicting the location of all temporary and permanent materials and shading/screening devices used to retrofit the building façade in response to the results of the monitoring plan.
  • Applicable specification details on all temporary and permanent materials and shading/screening devices used to retrofit the building façade in response to the results of the monitoring plan.

Develop and implement a plan to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions from nonroad and on-road diesel fueled vehicles, construction equipment, and temporary power generation used during construction projects.

The plan should include:

  1. Nonroad Diesel Engines

    For engines used on the jobsite that are 25 horsepower (HP) and greater, meet at least the equivalent of USEPA Tier 2 PM emission standards and the USEPA Tier 4 PM emission standard (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) as listed in the table below for the specified HP rating and during the specified calendar year. The equipment must meet the requirements listed for the current year the equipment is in use on the job site.

     
    Percent of Engines that Must Comply with Tier 4 PM Standard
    Year 25-74hp 75-174hp 175hp and above
    2012-2013 0% 25% 50%
    2014 25% 50% 95%
    2015 50% 95% 95%
    2016-2022 95% 95% 95%

    Compliance may be met with engines certified to meet the applicable USEPA Tier level, and/or equipment that has been retrofitted with technology verified to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the applicable USEPA Tier level. To the extent that retrofits are used to meet this requirement, the diesel retrofit technology used must be listed on the verified technology list for either the USEPA or the California Air Resources Board (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) current as of the time the equipment is first placed on the jobsite and must be installed and operated as designated by that verified list.

    Include measures for proper maintenance of the equipment to ensure continued future compliance with the emission standards.

  2. On-road Diesel Engines

    95% of all diesel engine contractor/ subcontractor vehicles used for the construction project must be:

    1. Vehicles that comply with USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards, or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.
    2. OR

    3. Vehicles with older engines that have been retrofitted with technology verified to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards for particulate matter. To the extent that retrofits are used to meet this requirement, the diesel retrofit technology used must be listed on the verified technology list for either the USEPA or the California Air Resources Board (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) current as of the time the vehicle is first placed on the jobsite and must be installed and operated as designated by that verified list.

    Include measures for proper maintenance of the vehicles to ensure continued future compliance with the emission standards.

  3. Idling Limitations

    Develop a policy to limit unnecessary vehicle and equipment engine idling to no more than 5 minutes, or in compliance with applicable local, state and national laws, whichever is more stringent. Include signage and operator communications/education.

  4. Prevention of Indoor Air Pollution

    Locate equipment, vehicles, and loading/unloading staging areas away from air intakes or operable openings of adjacent buildings.

  5. Equipment Information

    Include the following information for each piece of equipment, annually:

    1. Vehicle type
    2. Engine make
    3. Engine model number
    4. Serial number of engine
    5. Engine family name and model year
    6. Horse power and/or Kilowatts (for nonroad only)
    7. Current Tier level (for nonroad only)
    8. Serial number and VIN of vehicle
    9. Make and model number of USEPA/CARB verified emission control technology, if applicable (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.)
    10. Type of fuel used
    11. Number of use hours (if available)
Credit specific:
  • Copy of the particulate matter emissions reduction plan
  • Projects outside the U.S.: describe the equivalent standards used

Nonroad Diesel Engines

  • Horsepower rating, Tier 2 level, Tier 4 level for all equipment
  • Retrofitted equipment: describe the technology and methodologies used to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the applicable USEPA Tier level
  • Describe equipment maintenance measures that will be used, and how they will ensure continued compliance with the emission standards

On-Road Diesel Engines

  • Estimated number of on-road diesel engine contractor vehicles
  • Specifications for 95% of those vehicles that indicate compliance with USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards, or local equivalent
  • Retrofitted equipment: describe the technology and methodologies used to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards
  • Describe equipment maintenance measures that will be used, and how they will ensure continued compliance with the emission standards

Idling Limitations

  • Provide the policy that describes idling time limits; applicable local, state, and national laws; idling signage; and operator education plans

Prevention of Indoor Air Pollution

  • Information (plan or description) on the location of staging areas, air intakes, and operable openings of buildings
  • Information on how the location of the equipment staging areas prevents indoor air pollution

Equipment Information

  • Product manuals or specifications for the equipment that depict the characteristics listed in the requirements. Projects should maintain an annual inventory of equipment information.
Additional questions:
  1. The goal of this credit is to minimize particulate matter emissions and impacts from construction equipment. Do you believe that these requirements achieve this intent? Why or why not?
  2. Were there barriers to implementing the strategies used in this credit?
  3. Did you encounter difficulties in gathering the information for the idling plan implementation? If so, in what ways?
  4. For item 2 of the plan, is it feasible to require that on-road trips be tracked rather than on-road vehicles? Would this be difficult to track?
  5. How many pieces of equipment were used for this project? How many were owned by the contractor? How many were leased/rented?
  6. What was the entire project budget?
  7. In order to meet the pilot credit criteria, which actions below were taken above and beyond what would have been taken absent the effort to earn Clean Construction Pilot Credit for LEED?
  8. How many pieces of leased/rented equipment were used in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  9. How many pieces of your existing equipment were retrofitted with diesel emissions reduction technology in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  10. How many pieces of new equipment were purchased in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  11. How many pieces of used equipment were purchased in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  12. When were these pieces of equipment slated to be retired in the company’s business plan?

* This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

Recycle and/or salvage nonhazardous construction and demolition materials. Calculations can be by weight or volume but must be consistent throughout.

Exclude excavated soil, land-clearing debris, and alternative daily cover (ADC). Include wood waste converted to fuel (bio-fuel) in the calculations; other types of waste-to-energy are not considered diversion for this credit.

However, for projects that cannot meet credit requirements using reuse and recycling methods, waste-to-energy systems may be considered waste diversion if the European Commission Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC and Waste Incineration Directive 2000/76/EC are followed and Waste to Energy facilities meet applicable European Committee for Standardization (CEN) EN 303 standards.

Option 1. diversion (1-2 points)

Path 1. divert 50% and three material streams (1 point)

Divert at least 50% of the total construction and demolition material; diverted materials must include at least three material streams.

OR

Path 2. divert 75% and four material streams (2 points)

Divert at least 75% of the total construction and demolition material; diverted materials must include at least four material streams.

Option 2. reduction of total waste material (2 points)

Do not generate more than 2.5 pounds of construction waste per square foot (12.2 kilograms of waste per square meter) of the building's floor area.

Credit specific
Required Documentation BD&C Option 1 Option 2
List of construction waste generated and diverted to landfill itemizing the waste, the material stream, waste total amount, and diverted amount per item and total for project. All units of measure must be consistent x  
Evidence of average recycling rates for Commingled waste sorting Facilities (if applicable) x  
Explanation why Waste-to-Energy Must be Used (if applicable) x  
Proof of Certification for Waste-to-Energy Facilities (if applicable) x  
Waste per Area for entire project   x
Changes:
  • 4/1/2013: added documentation requirements
  • 6/19/2013: added CI to applicable rating systems

* This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

Designate 5% of all parking spaces used by the project as preferred parking for green vehicles. Clearly identify and enforce for sole use by green vehicles. Distribute preferred parking spaces proportionally among various parking sections (e.g. between short-term and long-term spaces).

Green vehicles must achieve a minimum green score of 45 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

A discounted parking rate of at least 20% for green vehicles is an acceptable substitute for preferred parking spaces. The discounted rate must be publicly posted at the entrance of the parking area and permanently available to every qualifying vehicle.

In addition to preferred parking for green vehicles, meet one of the following two options for alternative-fuel fueling stations:

Option 1. Electric vehicle charging

Install electrical vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) in 2% of all parking spaces used by the project. Clearly identify and reserve these spaces for the sole use by plug-in electric vehicles. . Parking spaces that include EVSE must be provided separate from and in addition to preferred parking spaces for green vehicles.

The EVSE must:

  • Provide a Level 2 charging capacity (208 – 240 volts) or greater.
  • Comply with the relevant regional or local standard for electrical connectors, such as SAE Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice J1772, SAE Electric Vehicle Conductive Charge Coupler or IEC 62196 of the International Electrotechnical Commission for projects outside the U.S.
  • Be networked or internet addressable and be capable of participating in a demand-response program or time-of-use pricing to encourage off-peak charging.

OR

Option 2. Liquid, gas, or battery facilities

Install liquid or gas alternative fuel fueling facilities or a battery switching station capable of refueling a number of vehicles per day equal to at least 2% of all parking spaces.

For New Construction projects self-identifying as warehouses only:

Option 1. Alternative-Fuel Vehicles (1 point)

Provide an on-site fleet with at least one yard tractor that is powered by electricity, propane, or natural gas. Provide on-site charging or refueling stations for the vehicles. Liquid or gas refueling stations must be separately ventilated or located outdoors.

Option 2. Reduced Truck Idling (1 point)

Provide an electrical connection for at least 50% of all dock door locations to limit truck idling at the dock.

Documentation requirements
    NC, CS, Retail, Healthcare Schools
Option 1 Option 2
Parking plan / site plan indicating main building entrance, preferred parking spaces, and alternative-fuel fueling stations x x  
Photographs of the method used to identify preferred parking spaces (and – if applicable – plug-in electric vehicle spaces) as being reserved solely for the intended vehicles x x  
For projects providing discounted parking rate, excerpt of the communication indicating the discounted parking and photos of signage x x  
Product specifications from manufacturer indicating compliance with a referenced regional standard such as SAE J1772 x x  
For projects using electrical connectors for alternative-fuel fueling stations, a narrative describing the strategies used to encourage off-peak charging x x  
For liquid or gaseous fueling stations located indoors, a copy of the mechanical ductwork plan indicating a dedicated exhaust system. x x  
Copy of the bus and nonbus vehicle fleets emissions reduction implementation plan     x
A signed letter demonstrating the commitment of the school (or other entity with control over the bus fleet) to the implementation of the plan     x

For New Construction projects self-identifying as warehouses only:

Option 1 Option 2
Specification on the yard jockey model and fuel type x  
Site plan indicating alternative-fuel fueling stations x  
For liquid or gaseous fueling stations located indoors, a copy of the mechanical ductwork plan indicating a dedicated exhaust system x  
Site plan showing electrical connector locations at loading dock doors   x
Manufacturer documentation for the electrical connectors installed   x
Additional Questions
  • Were other alternative fuel types considered for installation on the project site? If so, which fuel types and why were they not selected?
  • Has the project team explored future opportunities to link EVSE to the building’s utility grid (for demand response and time-of-use pricing)? Please expand upon conversations with the building’s utility provider and describe any obstacles you have encountered in this process.
  • Schools Only: Did you encounter difficulties in developing or exploring a phase-in plan for green bus and fleet vehicles? What particular requirement was most difficult?
  • Warehouses Only: Do you feel that both options of this credit sufficiently address the intent of the credit – to reduce pollution from conventionally-powered vehicles – for your space type? Why or why not?
Changes:
  • 3/15/2013: Lowered preferred parking space requirement from 7% to 5% Lowered charging station requirement from 3% to 2%. Removed international metric (fuel efficiency) to be replaced with ‘or equivalent for projects outside the US’.
Option 1. Photovoltaic-Ready Design (1 point)

A project team that installs a photovoltaic (PV) system that meets the requirements of EA Credit Renewable Energy is not eligible for this credit.
Meet EPA’s solar photovoltaic specifications for a renewable energy–ready home. Provide detailed information about such systems in the homeowner education manual so that future occupants can install an active PV system.

OR

Option 2. Solar Direct Hot Water–Ready Design (1 point)

A project team that installs a solar direct hot water (DHW) system that meets the requirements of EA Credit Water Heating is not eligible for this credit.

Meet EPA’s solar water heating specifications for a renewable energy–ready home. Provide detailed information about such systems in the homeowner education manual so that future occupants can install an active solar DHW system.

Credit specific:
  • Provide completed Solar Ready checklist(s) and all required support documents
Additional questions:
  • Do any items in the solar ready checklists seem unreasonable or unnecessary?
  • Would additional resources or training on how to design/install required items be helpful? If so, what specifically would you like to see?

Have all heating, cooling, and ventilation systems commissioned by a technician with North American Technician Excellence certification, HVAC contractor credentialed by an EPA-recognized HVAC Quality Installation Training and Oversight Organization (H-QUITO) (or equivalent as defined by USGBC). The technician must complete the ENERGY STAR for Homes, version 3, HVAC system quality installation contractor checklist, or equivalent as defined by USGBC.

Credit specific:
  • Completed HVAC installer checklist, and list installer’s name, company, and credential
Additional questions:
  • Was it challenging to find an qualified installer?
  • Did the HVAC installer charge the project extra to complete the checklists? If yes, how much?

Note: This credit is for lowrise multifamily and attached single family LEED for Homes projects. Detached single family homes are not eligible.

Multifamily projects only

Prohibit smoking in all common areas of the building. The prohibition must be communicated in building rental or lease agreements or in condo or co-op association covenants and restrictions, and provisions for enforcement must be included.

Locate any exterior designated smoking areas, including balconies where smoking is permitted, at least 25 feet (7.5 meters) from entries, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows opening to common areas.

Prohibit on-property smoking within 25 feet (7.5 meters) of entries, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows. Provide signage to allow smoking in designated areas, prohibit smoking in designated areas, or prohibit smoking on the entire property.

AND

Prohibit smoking throughout the building, including within living units. The prohibition must be communicated in building rental or lease agreements or in condo or co-op association covenants and restrictions, and provisions for enforcement must be included.

Credit specific:
  • Condo/leasing agreement that bans smoking, and rules on enforcement
Additional questions:
  • Did this credit have any impact on the builder/developer’s decision to ban smoking? Why or why not?
Changes:
  • 10/15/2013:
    credit now available for use by attached single family projects
Material ingredient optimization

Use products that document their material ingredient optimization using the paths below for at least 25%, by cost, of the total value of permanently installed products in the project.

  • USGBC approved program. Products that comply with building product optimization criteria approved by USGBC.

  • GreenScreen v1.2 Benchmark. Products that have fully inventoried chemical ingredients to 100 ppm that have no Benchmark 1 hazards:
    • If any ingredients are assessed with the GreenScreen List Translator, value these products at 100% of cost.
    • If all ingredients are have undergone a full GreenScreen Assessment, value these products at 150% of cost.
  • Cradle to Cradle v2 Certified. End use products are certified Cradle to Cradle. Products will be valued as follows:
    • Cradle to Cradle Gold: 100% of cost
    • Cradle to Cradle Platinum: 150% of cost
  • Cradle to Cradle v3 Certified. End use products are certified Cradle to Cradle. Products will be valued as follows:
    • Cradle to Cradle Silver: 100% of cost
    • Cradle to Cradle Gold or Platinum: 150% of cost
  • International Alternative Compliance Path – REACH Optimization. End use products and materials that do not contain substances that meet REACH criteria for substances of very high concern. If the product contains no ingredients listed on the REACH Authorization1 or Candidate2 list, value at 100% of cost.

For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost. For credit achievement calculation, the base contributing cost of individual products compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted to exceed 100% its total actual cost (before regional multipliers) and double counting of single product components compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted and in no case is a product permitted to contribute more than 200% of its total actual cost.

Structure and enclosure materials may not constitute more than 30% of the value of compliant building products.

Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?
Option 1. material ingredient reporting (1 point)

Use at least 20 different permanently installed products from at least five different manufacturers that use any of the following programs to demonstrate the chemical inventory of the product to at least 0.1% (1000 ppm).

  • Manufacturer Inventory. The manufacturer has published complete content inventory for the product following these guidelines:

    • A publicly available inventory of all ingredients identified by name and Chemical Abstract Service Registration Number (CASRN)

    • Materials defined as trade secret or intellectual property may withhold the name and/or CASRN but must disclose role, amount and GreenScreen benchmark, as defined in GreenScreen v1.2.
  • Health Product Declaration. The end use product has a published, complete Health Product Declaration with full disclosure of known hazards in compliance with the Health Product Declaration open Standard.
  • Cradle to Cradle. The end use product has been certified at the Cradle to Cradle v2 Basic level or Cradle to Cradle v3 Bronze level.
  • USGBC approved program. Other USGBC approved programs meeting the material ingredient reporting criteria.

* This credit language is drawn from the LEED v4 draft. Where other point totals are noted, this pilot credit is worth 1 point in total. *

Appliance and process water use

Install appliances, equipment, and processes within the project scope that meet the requirements listed in the tables below .

Table 2. Standards for appliances

Appliance Requirement
Residential clothes washers ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent
Commercial clothes washers CEE Tier 3A
Residential dishwashers (standard and compact) ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent
Prerinse spray valves ≤ 1.3 gpm (4.9 lpm)
Ice machine ENERGY STAR or performance equivalent and use either air-cooled or closed-loop cooling, such as chilled or condenser water system

gpm = gallons per minute
lpm = liters per minute

Table 3. Standards for processes

Process Requirement
Heat rejection and cooling No once-through cooling with potable water for any equipment or appliances that reject heat
Cooling towers and evaporative condensers Equip with:
  • makeup water meters
  • conductivity controllers and overflow alarms
  • efficient drift eliminators that reduce drift to maximum of 0.002% of recirculated water volume for counterflow towers and 0.005% of recirculated water flow for cross-flow towers

In addition, water-consuming appliances, equipment, and processes must meet the requirements listed in Tables 4 and 5.

Table 4. Standards for appliances

Kitchen equipment Requirement (IP units) Requirement (SI units)
Dishwasher Undercounter ≤ 1.6 gal/rack ≤ 6.0 liters/rack
Stationary, single tank, door ≤ 1.4 gal/rack ≤ 5.3 liters/rack
Single tank, conveyor ≤ 1.0 gal/rack ≤ 3.8 liters/rack
Multiple tank, conveyor ≤ 0.9 gal/rack ≤ 3.4liters/rack
Flight machine ≤ 180 gal/hour ≤ 680 liters/hour
Food steamer Batch ≤ 6 gal/hour/pan ≤ 23 liters/hour/pan
Cook-to-order ≤ 10 gal/hour/pan ≤ 38 liters/hour/pan
Combination oven Countertop or stand ≤ 3.5 gal/hour/pan ≤ 13 liters/hour/pan
Roll-in ≤ 3.5 gal/hour/pan ≤ 13 liters/hour/pan

Table 5. Standards for processes

Process Requirement
Discharge water temperature tempering Where local requirements limit discharge temperature of fluids into drainage system, use tempering device that runs water only when equipment discharges hot water
OR
Provide thermal recovery heat exchanger that cools drained discharge water below code-required maximum discharge temperatures while simultaneously preheating inlet makeup water
OR
If fluid is steam condensate, return it to boiler
Venturi-type flow-through vacuum generators or aspirators Use no device that generates vacuum by means of water flow through device into drain

Credit specific:

NC, CS, Schools, Retail NC, CI, Retail CI, Healthcare:

  1. Provide a schedule indicating ALL process water equipment. Indicate which types of equipment that are being installed on the project are applicable to the credit and the quantity of equipment which is to be installed. For Healthcare, Schools, Retail and Hospitality projects, include the items in Tables 3& 4 as well.
  2. Provide a floor plan indicating the location of all process water equipment.
  3. Submit one-line diagrams of all piping systems associated with the referenced equipment, inclusive of design flow rates for both supply and effluent.
  4. Provide approved manufacturer's information (i.e. cut sheets, shop drawings, submittals) for each piece of equipment applicable to this credit, indicating at a minimum
    water usage, capacity of equipment, and energy star rating (if applicable).

EBOM:
Provide a copy of the purchasing policy, which must include:

  1. detail on its physical and programmatic scope;
  2. duration of applicability;
  3. responsible parties (by individual name or title);
  4. sustainability goals and objectives;
  5. procedures and strategies for implementation;
  6. specific metrics by which performance will be measured; and
  7. a quality assurance process to evaluate and verify successful implementation of the policy.

AND
Provide the following:

  • a log of all existing equipment covered by the credit
  • a maintenance plan and log to ensure that the equipment is being properly maintained (and not leaking)
  • documentation that at least 20% of all installed equipment and 100% of purchases during the performance period meet the requirements.
Additional questions:
  1. Did your project include any other appliances or process water items that should be included in the credit?
  2. Were you able to find suitable products at a reasonable cost at the flow rates required?
Changes:
  • Changes made for 2nd Public Comment (08/01/2011):
    Added Healthcare to the applicable rating system types
    Restructured EBOM requirements based on new EBOM structure for LEED 2012 and
    aligned purchasing agreement language with other EBOM purchasing credits.
    Separate submittal requirements for NC vs. EBOM
    Added Ice Machine requirement (ENERGY STAR) originally in the Appliance & Process Water credit from LEED 2012.
    Clarified Discharge Water Temperature Tempering requirement is based on the water leaving the appliance (rather than the tank) to reduce maintenance concerns.
  • Changes made for 3rd Public Comment (03/01/2012):
    Updated requirements based on changes for 3rd public comments.
    Separated Tables 3&4 addressing food service and specialty process water items not usually included in a commercial office building. These requirements only apply to Healthcare, Schools, Retail and Hospitality projects.
    Removed some process and appliance requirements for EBOM
  • Changes made for 5th Public Comment (01/15/2013):
    Updated metrics to align with 5th Public Comment changes to LEED v4
  • Changes made based on feedback (03/15/2013):
    Modified EBOM requirements to include purchasing logs and inventory of current equipment
    Clarified that projects without any applicable equipment are ineligible

Meet all of the following requirements:

  1. Meet the requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes, version 3

    Complete the thermal enclosure system rater checklist, the HVAC system quality installation rater and contractor checklists, and the water management system builder checklist. Certified passive house projects automatically meet the thermal enclosure system rater checklist requirement.

    Achieve a HERS index rating at or below the HERS index target (or USGBC-approved equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) or meet the requirements of the ENERGY STAR for Homes version 3 Prescriptive Pathway, which includes meeting or exceeding all components of the ENERGY STAR Reference Design.

  2. At least one of the following appliances must be ENERGY STAR qualified (or performance equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) and installed in each dwelling unit:
    • refrigerator;
    • dishwasher; or
    • clothes washer.
  3. All duct runs must be fully ducted (i.e., building cavities may not be used as ducts).

Existing portions of an existing building are given the following allowances:
Thermal Enclosure System Rater Checklist
2.1. Slab insulation is strongly encouraged but not required to meet or exceed 2009 IECC levels.
4.1. Attic insulation at the intersection of existing roof and existing exterior walls does not have to meet R-value requirements.
4.4.5e. Advanced framing is not required on existing framed walls,
5.2.1. Existing sill plates on top of concrete are not required to be placed on a foam gasket.
Water-Managed Site and Foundation
1.3. A capillary break under an existing slab is not required unless there are visible signs of moisture damage on the slab floor.
1.5. Exterior below-grade walls are not required to be damp-proofed on the exterior surface unless there are visible signs of moisture damage on the interior of the wall.
1.8 - Drain tiles surrounded with clean gravel and fabric filter are not required for existing slabs, unless there are visible signs of moisture damage on the slab floor
2, 3. Water-managed wall and roof assembly requirements are not required for existing walls or roofing unless there are signs of moisture damage related to vulnerabilities in the walls or roof.

Credit specific:
  • All completed inspection checklists
  • HERS Target Index, building’s HERS Index
All projects: Meet the following requirement:

Buildings must have at least one main stair that enables occupants to travel between the building entrance floor(s), occupant’s own destination floor and common use floors. Access to floors may be restricted by use of security devices, such as card keys, codes or other access devices.

AND

Include seven or more of the following features within the project:

For primary staircase(s) identified above*:

  1. Classify all regularly occupied floors for re-entry, allowing all building users to have access to and from these floors. Service floors do not need access for all users.
  2. Make accessible staircases visible from the corridor by either:
    • providing transparent glazing of at least 10 square feet (1 square meter) at all stair doors or at a side light
    • providing magnetic door holds on all doors leading to the stairs.
    • providing unenclosed stairs.
  3. Provide accessibility to at least one open or interconnecting staircase to at least 50% of the tenant/occupant floors for convenient pedestrian vertical circulation.
  4. Locate a main staircase to be visible from main building lobby and within 25 foot (7.5 meters) walking distance from any edge of the lobby. Ensure that no turns or obstacles prevent visibility of or accessibility to the qualifying staircase from the lobby.
  5. Locate a main staircase to be visible before an occupant visually encounters any motorized vertical circulation (elevator/escalator). The staircase must be visible from the principal point of entry at each building floor.
  6. Install architectural light fixtures that provide a level of lighting in the staircase(s) consistent with or better than what is provided in the building corridor.
  7. Provide daylighting at each floor/roof level of the stair(s) using either windows and/or skylights of at least 8 square feet (1 square meter) in size.
  8. Place signage encouraging stair use for health and other benefits at all elevator call areas, next to escalators and outside stairwells on each floor.
  9. Use inviting sensory stimulation such as artwork and/or music in stairwells.
  10. Elsewhere within the project:

  11. Provide exercise equipment or exercise opportunities for at least 5% of FTE occupants that can be used at employee workstations to allow workers opportunities for physical activity while working at their desks. Examples of appropriate exercise equipment include but are not limited to tread-desks, desk stationary bicycles, exercise ball chairs, desk stepper and others. A checkout system can be put in place to allow employees to check out equipment.
  12. Provide a dedicated or multi-use space to act as an on-site exercise room, which includes a variety of exercise equipment, for use by at least 5% of FTE occupants.

* Note: Ramps or other means of pedestrian vertical circulation also qualify for this category.

AND
For LEED for Homes multi-family and LEED for Schools projects:

Provide an onsite recreation space with exercise opportunities for both adults and children that is open and accessible to all residents. The space must be at least 400 square feet (37 square meters) for all buildings that have greater than 10 units or classrooms. Include adult exercise and children’s play equipment for a minimum of 5% of building occupants. Gardening activity space and equipment can also count as adult active recreation space and equipment.

All projects: Meet the following requirement:

Buildings must have at least one main stair that enables occupants to travel between the building entrance floor(s), occupant’s own destination floor and common use floors. Access to floors may be restricted by use of security devices, such as card keys, codes or other access devices.

AND

Include seven or more of the following features within the project:

For primary staircase(s) identified above*:

  1. Classify all regularly occupied floors for re-entry, allowing all building users to have access to and from these floors. Service floors do not need access for all users.
  2. Make accessible staircases visible from the corridor by either:
    • providing transparent glazing of at least 10 square feet (1 square meter) at all stair doors or at a side light
    • providing magnetic door holds on all doors leading to the stairs.
    • providing unenclosed stairs.
  3. Provide accessibility to at least one open or interconnecting staircase to at least 50% of the tenant/occupant floors for convenient pedestrian vertical circulation.
  4. Locate a main staircase to be visible from main building lobby and within 25 foot (7.5 meters) walking distance from any edge of the lobby. Ensure that no turns or obstacles prevent visibility of or accessibility to the qualifying staircase from the lobby.
  5. Locate a main staircase to be visible before an occupant visually encounters any motorized vertical circulation (elevator/escalator). The staircase must be visible from the principal point of entry at each building floor.
  6. Install architectural light fixtures that provide a level of lighting in the staircase(s) consistent with or better than what is provided in the building corridor.
  7. Provide daylighting at each floor/roof level of the stair(s) using either windows and/or skylights of at least 8 square feet (1 square meter) in size.
  8. Place signage encouraging stair use for health and other benefits at all elevator call areas, next to escalators and outside stairwells on each floor.
  9. Use inviting sensory stimulation such as artwork and/or music in stairwells.
  10. Elsewhere within the project:

  11. Provide exercise equipment or exercise opportunities for at least 5% of FTE occupants that can be used at employee workstations to allow workers opportunities for physical activity while working at their desks. Examples of appropriate exercise equipment include but are not limited to tread-desks, desk stationary bicycles, exercise ball chairs, desk stepper and others. A checkout system can be put in place to allow employees to check out equipment.
  12. Provide a dedicated or multi-use space to act as an on-site exercise room, which includes a variety of exercise equipment, for use by at least 5% of FTE occupants.

* Note: Ramps or other means of pedestrian vertical circulation also qualify for this category.

AND
For LEED for Homes multi-family and LEED for Schools projects:

Provide an onsite recreation space with exercise opportunities for both adults and children that is open and accessible to all residents. The space must be at least 400 square feet (37 square meters) for all buildings that have greater than 10 units or classrooms. Include adult exercise and children’s play equipment for a minimum of 5% of building occupants. Gardening activity space and equipment can also count as adult active recreation space and equipment.

Credit Specific:
  • Floor plan indicating:

    • location of the main stair(s)
    • minimum number tenant floors with accessibility to the staircase
    • staircase visibility and walking distance
    • staircase location along the principal path of travel
  • Based on the measures selected, provide the following:
    1. Signage indicating that the floors are classified for re-entry.
    2. Photographs or diagrams depicting the glazing or magnetic door holds
    3. Lighting diagrams indicating the light level equivalent between the stair-case and main building corridor,
    4. Stairwell diagrams indicating the size and location of windows and/or skylights.
    5. Lists of exercise equipment or exercise opportunities provided to FTE occupants and calculations indicating that the amount purchased can simultaneously serve than 5% of FTE.
    6. Floorplan showing recreation space provided to occupants.,
Additional Questions
  • To what extent would you have included these features if they were not rewarded via this Pilot credit?
  • How did the credit requirements change the floor plan layouts and other space distri-bution considerations?
  • Did the local building codes and/or zoning impede your achievement of any require-ments? If so, which and how?
  • How might project teams monitor the use of the stairs and/or exercise equipment or spaces?
  • What other design considerations would you suggest and/or have your included to motivate increased building occupant activity?
  • Did the local building codes and/or zoning codes facilitate your achievement of any requirements? If so, which and how?
Changes
  • 11/01/2013:
    clarified that stair requirements can be met using multiple "main stairs" and do not need to be met for auxiliary (non-main) stairs.
Product Manufacturer Supply Chain Optimization (1 point)

Project Team: Use building products that are sourced from product manufacturers who procure raw materials from suppliers meeting criteria below for at least 25%, by cost, of the total value of permanently installed products in the project.

Manufacturers: Engage in validated and robust safety, health, hazard, and risk programs. Document at least 99% by weight of the ingredients used to make the building product or building material are sourced from companies with independent third party verification of the following along the manufacturer supply chain:

  • Processes are in place to communicate and transparently prioritize chemical ingredients along the supply chain according to available hazard, exposure and use information to identify those that require more detailed evaluation
  • Processes are in place to identify, document, and communicate information on health, safety and environmental characteristics of chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to implement measures to manage the health, safety and environmental hazard and risk of chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to optimize health, safety and environmental impacts when designing and improving chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to communicate, receive and evaluate chemical ingredient safety and stewardship information along the supply chain
  • Safety and stewardship information about the chemical ingredients is publicly available from all points along the supply chain

For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost. For credit achievement calculation, the base contributing cost of individual products compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted to exceed 100% its total actual cost (before regional multipliers) and double counting of single product components compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted and in no case is a product permitted to contribute more than 200% of its total actual cost.

Structure and enclosure materials may not constitute more than 30% of the value of compliant building products.

Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?

Use interior finishes and furnishings from manufacturers who have validated multiple environmental attributes relevant to the product via independent third party certifications and that have publically disclosed the product attributes on which the certification has been granted.
Use at least 5 different third party certified products which account for at least 50% of the total interior finishes and furnishing materials by cost.

Approved 3rd party certifications:

  • ANSI/BIFMA e3 – 2012 Furniture Sustainability Standard

    • Level 1 certified products contribute 25% of the total product cost
    • Level 2 certified products contribute 50% of the total product cost
    • Level 3 certified products contribute 100% of the total product cost
  • Other USGBC approved multi-attribute certification programs
Credit Specific

Determine the total value of all interior finishes and furnishings by adding the value of the hard costs of CSI MasterFormat 2004 Divisions 9 and 12. This includes cost associated with delivery of the product to the site, but excludes installation and labor costs. Provide a list of products purchased contributing toward credit and indicate the applicable label/certification. List the cost and number of items purchased per product and calculate the weighted value according to the values above. If compliant products are limited to only one CSI division, project teams are permitted to account for costs in that single division. Record table should include the following information for each product/material:

  • Name/Description
  • Manufacturer
  • Total Material Cost ($)
  • Availability of product “scorecard” (yes/no)
  • Percent of product compliant with 3rd party certification (% by Weight)
  • Compliant Product Value
Additional Questions
  • How difficult was it to locate the applicable level of labels receiving credit?
  • What were the major barriers to achieving credit performance? Do you think the threshold(s) is reasonable?
  • What labels would you like USGBC to consider for inclusion in this pilot credit?

Use interior finishes and furnishings from manufacturers who have validated multiple environmental attributes relevant to the product via independent third party certifications and that have publically disclosed the product attributes on which the certification has been granted.
Use at least 5 different third party certified products which account for at least 50% of the total interior finishes and furnishing materials by cost.

Approved 3rd party certifications:

  • ANSI/BIFMA e3 – 2012 Furniture Sustainability Standard

    • Level 1 certified products contribute 25% of the total product cost
    • Level 2 certified products contribute 50% of the total product cost
    • Level 3 certified products contribute 100% of the total product cost
  • Other USGBC approved multi-attribute certification programs
Credit Specific

Determine the total value of all interior finishes and furnishings by adding the value of the hard costs of CSI MasterFormat 2004 Divisions 9 and 12. This includes cost associated with delivery of the product to the site, but excludes installation and labor costs. Provide a list of products purchased contributing toward credit and indicate the applicable label/certification. List the cost and number of items purchased per product and calculate the weighted value according to the values above. If compliant products are limited to only one CSI division, project teams are permitted to account for costs in that single division. Record table should include the following information for each product/material:

  • Name/Description
  • Manufacturer
  • Total Material Cost ($)
  • Availability of product “scorecard” (yes/no)
  • Percent of product compliant with 3rd party certification (% by Weight)
  • Compliant Product Value
Additional Questions
  • How difficult was it to locate the applicable level of labels receiving credit?
  • What were the major barriers to achieving credit performance? Do you think the threshold(s) is reasonable?
  • What labels would you like USGBC to consider for inclusion in this pilot credit?
Option 1: Food production

Provide for onsite food production: vegetable gardens and/or edible nut- and fruit-bearing plants appropriate to the site

Dedicate a portion of the site to food production. Size the area using one of the following metrics:

BD+C, ID+C or EBOM projects (except Schools)

  • At least 10% of the site’s vegetated area
  • At least 1,500 square feet of hydroponic area
  • At least 50% of usable roof top space (excluding mechanical equipment, etc.)
  • At least 3,000 cubic feet of vertical farming or vertically stacked agriculture (length x width x height)
  • At least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent (excluding visitors)

LEED for Homes or Mid-Rise projects:

  • 200 square feet per single family home
  • 100 square feet per unit for multifamily

Schools Projects:

  • 500 square feet in facility of less than 500 students
  • 1,000 square feet in facility of 500 – 1,000 students
  • 1,500 square feet in facility of over 1,000 students

All projects except Homes:

The project must use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) processes. Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented.

AND for Schools:

For educational purposes, food growing areas must be at least 50% of square footage requirements. The provision of agricultural space must be complemented by programmatic areas nearby and designed for students to congregate. Programmatic areas could include but are not limited to classrooms and cafeterias.

Homes & Multifamily Mid-rise:

Multifamily projects must use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) processes. Ensure that there are no deed restrictions that prohibit food production on the residential properties. Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.

Option 2: Community Supported Agriculture

Purchase shares in a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program for at least 50% of the occupants or 80% of the residential units within the project. Shares must be delivered to the project site on a regular schedule not less than twice per month and at least six months of the year. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented.

Option 3: Support an existing farm

Project proponent

  • Provide financial support to the farm equivalent to ¼ of 1% of the total project construction cost. Or, provide material support in kind, equivalent to the dollar value – materials to be negotiated with the farm.
  • Provide minimum 8 hours per Full Time Employee equivalent (FTE) per year to volunteer in farm operations - on the project proponent’s time. Hours could be consolidated, allowing some FTE to work more and others to not participate in the food production project. FTE volunteers would be required to follow farm training, minimum 1 hour (included within the 8 hour volunteer time). Time must be allocated by employers out of the standard work week, rather than weekend or evening hours.
  • For both financial support and FTE, a commitment for three years support/participation would be required.

Material support in kind could include fencing, soil, compost, construction materials, tools, etc.

Farm training could be in planting, harvesting, maintenance, or other operations: skilled labor is in demand in farms, unskilled labor is not as useful.

See the Resources tab of this pilot credit for recommendations on soil testing, fertilizer and herbicide use.

Credit specific
Option 1:
  • Site plan highlighting food production locations, access points, and water sources
  • Area calculations (in square feet), showing that the food production areas make up at least 10 percent of the site’s vegetated area
  • Site, greenhouse, and /or roof plan with dimensions and calculations demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production.
  • Supplemental documentation confirming the permanent infrastructure, including, as applicable: solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.
  • A narrative describing the IPM process in the garden(s).
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner. (not required for Homes)
Option 1 Schools:

Schools projects provide the following:

  • Site, greenhouse, and /or roof plan with dimensions and calculations demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production.
  • Supplemental documentation confirming the permanent infrastructure, including, as applicable: solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.
  • A narrative describing the IPM process in the garden(s).
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building owner.
  • Outline of the lesson plans used to teach students about community food production.
  • A narrative explaining the garden maintenance plan for school breaks.
Option 2: Community Supported Agriculture
  • A copy of the contract or letter of commitment for the three-year CSA agreement.
  • A narrative or drawing confirming the location of the pick-up area within the site and the location of the CSA farm.
  • Calculations demonstrating the number of occupants or residential units in the program.
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner.
Option 3: Support an Existing Farm
  • Evidence of financial or material support, such as:

    • a copy of the signed contract with the farm that includes the amount of financial donation or specific materials donated, and the length of commitment
    • a receipt showing transactions and time period to which they apply

  • Outline of LEED project construction cost
  • Evidence of volunteer hours, such as:
    • a copy of the signed contract with the farm that includes the amount and type of volunteer hours proposed, training, when the volunteering would occur, and who would be volunteering
    • a list and short description of volunteer hours already provided, including training, who volunteered, and when it took place
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner.
Changes
  • 11/01/2013:
    Revised to allow options from EBOM to be used by all project types. Added LEED for Homes requirements.
  • 04/04/2014:
    removed "urban" from "urban farm" in option 3
Option 1: Food production

Provide for onsite food production: vegetable gardens and/or edible nut- and fruit-bearing plants appropriate to the site

Dedicate a portion of the site to food production. Size the area using one of the following metrics:

BD+C, ID+C or EBOM projects (except Schools)

  • At least 10% of the site’s vegetated area
  • At least 1,500 square feet of hydroponic area
  • At least 50% of usable roof top space (excluding mechanical equipment, etc.)
  • At least 3,000 cubic feet of vertical farming or vertically stacked agriculture (length x width x height)
  • At least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent (excluding visitors)

LEED for Homes or Mid-Rise projects:

  • 200 square feet per single family home
  • 100 square feet per unit for multifamily

Schools Projects:

  • 500 square feet in facility of less than 500 students
  • 1,000 square feet in facility of 500 – 1,000 students
  • 1,500 square feet in facility of over 1,000 students

All projects except Homes:

The project must use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) processes. Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented.

AND for Schools:

For educational purposes, food growing areas must be at least 50% of square footage requirements. The provision of agricultural space must be complemented by programmatic areas nearby and designed for students to congregate. Programmatic areas could include but are not limited to classrooms and cafeterias.

Homes & Multifamily Mid-rise:

Multifamily projects must use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) processes. Ensure that there are no deed restrictions that prohibit food production on the residential properties. Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.

Option 2: Community Supported Agriculture

Purchase shares in a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program for at least 50% of the occupants or 80% of the residential units within the project. Shares must be delivered to the project site on a regular schedule not less than twice per month and at least six months of the year. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented.

Option 3: Support an existing farm

Project proponent

  • Provide financial support to the farm equivalent to ¼ of 1% of the total project construction cost. Or, provide material support in kind, equivalent to the dollar value – materials to be negotiated with the farm.
  • Provide minimum 8 hours per Full Time Employee equivalent (FTE) per year to volunteer in farm operations - on the project proponent’s time. Hours could be consolidated, allowing some FTE to work more and others to not participate in the food production project. FTE volunteers would be required to follow farm training, minimum 1 hour (included within the 8 hour volunteer time). Time must be allocated by employers out of the standard work week, rather than weekend or evening hours.
  • For both financial support and FTE, a commitment for three years support/participation would be required.

Material support in kind could include fencing, soil, compost, construction materials, tools, etc.

Farm training could be in planting, harvesting, maintenance, or other operations: skilled labor is in demand in farms, unskilled labor is not as useful.

See the Resources tab of this pilot credit for recommendations on soil testing, fertilizer and herbicide use.

Credit specific
Option 1:
  • Site plan highlighting food production locations, access points, and water sources
  • Area calculations (in square feet), showing that the food production areas make up at least 10 percent of the site’s vegetated area
  • Site, greenhouse, and /or roof plan with dimensions and calculations demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production.
  • Supplemental documentation confirming the permanent infrastructure, including, as applicable: solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.
  • A narrative describing the IPM process in the garden(s).
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner. (not required for Homes)
Option 1 Schools:

Schools projects provide the following:

  • Site, greenhouse, and /or roof plan with dimensions and calculations demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production.
  • Supplemental documentation confirming the permanent infrastructure, including, as applicable: solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.
  • A narrative describing the IPM process in the garden(s).
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building owner.
  • Outline of the lesson plans used to teach students about community food production.
  • A narrative explaining the garden maintenance plan for school breaks.
Option 2: Community Supported Agriculture
  • A copy of the contract or letter of commitment for the three-year CSA agreement.
  • A narrative or drawing confirming the location of the pick-up area within the site and the location of the CSA farm.
  • Calculations demonstrating the number of occupants or residential units in the program.
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner.
Option 3: Support an Existing Farm
  • Evidence of financial or material support, such as:

    • a copy of the signed contract with the farm that includes the amount of financial donation or specific materials donated, and the length of commitment
    • a receipt showing transactions and time period to which they apply

  • Outline of LEED project construction cost
  • Evidence of volunteer hours, such as:
    • a copy of the signed contract with the farm that includes the amount and type of volunteer hours proposed, training, when the volunteering would occur, and who would be volunteering
    • a list and short description of volunteer hours already provided, including training, who volunteered, and when it took place
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner.
Changes
  • 11/01/2013:
    Revised to allow options from EBOM to be used by all project types. Added LEED for Homes requirements.
  • 04/04/2014:
    removed "urban" from "urban farm" in option 3
Option 1: Food production

Provide for onsite food production: vegetable gardens and/or edible nut- and fruit-bearing plants appropriate to the site

Dedicate a portion of the site to food production. Size the area using one of the following metrics:

BD+C, ID+C or EBOM projects (except Schools)

  • At least 10% of the site’s vegetated area
  • At least 1,500 square feet of hydroponic area
  • At least 50% of usable roof top space (excluding mechanical equipment, etc.)
  • At least 3,000 cubic feet of vertical farming or vertically stacked agriculture (length x width x height)
  • At least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent (excluding visitors)

LEED for Homes or Mid-Rise projects:

  • 200 square feet per single family home
  • 100 square feet per unit for multifamily

Schools Projects:

  • 500 square feet in facility of less than 500 students
  • 1,000 square feet in facility of 500 – 1,000 students
  • 1,500 square feet in facility of over 1,000 students

All projects except Homes:

The project must use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) processes. Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented.

AND for Schools:

For educational purposes, food growing areas must be at least 50% of square footage requirements. The provision of agricultural space must be complemented by programmatic areas nearby and designed for students to congregate. Programmatic areas could include but are not limited to classrooms and cafeterias.

Homes & Multifamily Mid-rise:

Multifamily projects must use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) processes. Ensure that there are no deed restrictions that prohibit food production on the residential properties. Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.

Option 2: Community Supported Agriculture

Purchase shares in a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program for at least 50% of the occupants or 80% of the residential units within the project. Shares must be delivered to the project site on a regular schedule not less than twice per month and at least six months of the year. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented.

Option 3: Support an existing farm

Project proponent

  • Provide financial support to the farm equivalent to ¼ of 1% of the total project construction cost. Or, provide material support in kind, equivalent to the dollar value – materials to be negotiated with the farm.
  • Provide minimum 8 hours per Full Time Employee equivalent (FTE) per year to volunteer in farm operations - on the project proponent’s time. Hours could be consolidated, allowing some FTE to work more and others to not participate in the food production project. FTE volunteers would be required to follow farm training, minimum 1 hour (included within the 8 hour volunteer time). Time must be allocated by employers out of the standard work week, rather than weekend or evening hours.
  • For both financial support and FTE, a commitment for three years support/participation would be required.

Material support in kind could include fencing, soil, compost, construction materials, tools, etc.

Farm training could be in planting, harvesting, maintenance, or other operations: skilled labor is in demand in farms, unskilled labor is not as useful.

See the Resources tab of this pilot credit for recommendations on soil testing, fertilizer and herbicide use.

Credit specific
Option 1:
  • Site plan highlighting food production locations, access points, and water sources
  • Area calculations (in square feet), showing that the food production areas make up at least 10 percent of the site’s vegetated area
  • Site, greenhouse, and /or roof plan with dimensions and calculations demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production.
  • Supplemental documentation confirming the permanent infrastructure, including, as applicable: solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.
  • A narrative describing the IPM process in the garden(s).
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner. (not required for Homes)
Option 1 Schools:

Schools projects provide the following:

  • Site, greenhouse, and /or roof plan with dimensions and calculations demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production.
  • Supplemental documentation confirming the permanent infrastructure, including, as applicable: solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.
  • A narrative describing the IPM process in the garden(s).
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building owner.
  • Outline of the lesson plans used to teach students about community food production.
  • A narrative explaining the garden maintenance plan for school breaks.
Option 2: Community Supported Agriculture
  • A copy of the contract or letter of commitment for the three-year CSA agreement.
  • A narrative or drawing confirming the location of the pick-up area within the site and the location of the CSA farm.
  • Calculations demonstrating the number of occupants or residential units in the program.
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner.
Option 3: Support an Existing Farm
  • Evidence of financial or material support, such as:

    • a copy of the signed contract with the farm that includes the amount of financial donation or specific materials donated, and the length of commitment
    • a receipt showing transactions and time period to which they apply

  • Outline of LEED project construction cost
  • Evidence of volunteer hours, such as:
    • a copy of the signed contract with the farm that includes the amount and type of volunteer hours proposed, training, when the volunteering would occur, and who would be volunteering
    • a list and short description of volunteer hours already provided, including training, who volunteered, and when it took place
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner.
Changes
  • 11/01/2013:
    Revised to allow options from EBOM to be used by all project types. Added LEED for Homes requirements.
  • 04/04/2014:
    removed "urban" from "urban farm" in option 3

Reduce the energy load for all diagnostic imaging equipment (x-rays, MRIs, etc), sterilization, and point- of-use electric steam generators installed in the project, (but excluding other types of medical equipment):

  • At least 50%, by rated power, of medical equipment purchased for the project shall be among the 25th percentile of lowest energy consumers for that class of equipment. Equipment shall be compared based on their continuous (or “standby”) mode electrical energy consumption.

Obtain structural engineer verification that the design and constructing of the building is capable of supporting planned photovoltaic technologies on the roof.

AND

Enter into a rooftop lease agreement committing to provide renewable, solar energy for distributed generation1that meets the following requirements:

Solar facility capacity Points
250 kW  
500 kW  
1,000 kW  

The agreement must specify an expected commercial operation date for the solar facility that is within 18 months of building construction completion.

Capacity of the solar facility shall be determined by summing the photovoltaic module (PV) power listed on the nameplates of the PV modules in units of watt and then dividing by 1,000 to convert to kilowatt (kW).

The PV module power ratings are for Standard Test Conditions (STC) of 1000 W/sq. meters solar irradiance and 25oC PV module temperature.

While projects may use electricity from the solar facility, the facility cannot count towards the achievement of EAc2: On-site Renewable Energy (BD&C rating systems) and EAc4 On-site and Off-site Renewable Energy (O&M rating systems).

The building is prohibited from receiving or claiming ownership of environmental attributes generated by the on-site renewable energy facility. Environmental attributes shall include, without limitation, any and all carbon credits, renewable energy credits, emissions reductions, reporting rights, offsets and allowances attributable to the electric energy produced by the solar facility.

1Distributed generation is the use of small-scale power generation technologies located close to the load being served. These systems reduce the amount of energy lost in transmitting electricity because the electricity is generated very near where it is used. Distributed generation systems are typically smaller than 10,000 kW. For purposes of this credit, distributed generation systems must deliver power to the utility distribution grid rather than to an individual building.
2As a pilot credit, project teams will earn one point regardless of the threshold achieved. USGBC is indicating multiple thresholds to display the credit’s intended structure.

Establishment
Consumption feedback

Implement one or more modes of communication to inform occupants about the actual energy consumption of the building and/or their workspace. This may be done in real-time, or through regular reporting mechanisms, but must be communicated at least on a monthly basis. Occupants must be given information with a relevant comparison point; the comparison point(s) may either be comparable buildings or spaces, or historical energy consumption data for the same space (at least 1 years worth of data, or predicted usage if 1 years data is not yet available).

Occupant empowerment

Implement and maintain an occupant engagement program that involves communicating with, enabling and empowering building occupants to help meet the sustainability goals for the building. The occupant engagement initiative(s) must include the following minimum requirements:

  1. Education – provide accurate, up-to-date, and catered information to building occupants about what their largest impacts are on the energy use of the building and where the largest areas for potential savings exist. This may be achieved through a one-time event like a competition or awareness week or month, but also must include some permanent educational components, which must be updated to account for any seasonal variations in energy consumption and building performance.
  2. Enabling – occupants must be made aware of specific actions they can take to improve the performance of the building, not just the impacts they have on resource use in their building
  3. Feedback to management – occupants must be provided a clear avenue for reporting building-related energy or water inefficiencies to building management

Establish performance goals and develop a way to effectively track the success of the program.

The engagement program must also address more than one building system: lighting, HVAC, plug loads. If occupants do not have direct control over lighting and/or central HVAC systems, alternative methods and strategies that support energy conservation for these systems are acceptable (e.g., window shade control and use).

The engagement program must not encourage behaviors that significantly affect the productivity of occupants or their comfort, such as lighting quality and thermal comfort.

Performance

Track and document the results of the occupant engagement initiative(s) against the established performance goals and identify areas for improvement. These results must be recorded on a regular basis and summarized for the performance period.

Credit specific
  1. Provide a summary of occupant engagement program that includes, at a minimum

    1. Performance goals for the program and how they relate to the overall sustainability goals for the building
    2. Communication mechanism(s) used for consumption feedback and the data/information presented to occupants about the actual energy consumption of the building and/or their space
    3. Specific energy-saving actions occupants were encouraged to take

Optional:

  1. If available, submit any metrics and/or quantitative data used to measure the success of the occupant engagement program (e.g., energy consumption data, records of complaint/report logs, event participation records, etc.)
Additional questions
  • Were you able to understand and comply with the credit language as written
  • In four sentences or less, why did the project choose to pursue this pilot credit?
  • Were the barriers to implementing the strategies used under this credit
  • Prior to the implementation of the occupant engagement program, in your own judgement, how would you have defined the level of knowledge the occupants had about energy efficient practices (e.g., environmentally savvy, clueless, not sure)?
  • Did you notice any change(s) in occupant behavior in relation to energy efficient practices during and/or after the implementation of the occupant engagement program?
  • Were there aspects of the occupant engagement program that you thought about implementing but then decided not to?
  • What are your plans for maintaining the occupant engagement program after the conclusion of the performance period?
  • Did this program have support from upper-level management?

Meet California South Coast Air Quality Management District standards for all products of combustion. Do not exceed the emission limits below for products of combustion, as outlined in the following California South Coast Air Quality Management District Rules:

  • (Amended February 1, 2008), Emissions from Gaseous- and Liquid-Fueled
    Internal Combustion Engines

  • 1111 (Amended July 8, 1983), NOx Emissions from Natural-Gas-Fired, FanType Central Furnaces
  • 1121 (Amended September 3, 2004) Control of Nitrogen Oxides from Residential Type, Natural Gas-Fired Water Heaters
  • 1146 (Amended November 17, 2000), Emissions of Oxides of Nitrogen from Industrial, Institutional, and Commercial Boilers, Steam Generators, and Process Heaters
  • 1146.1 (Amended May 13, 1994), Emissions of Oxides of Nitrogen from Small Industrial, Institutional, and Commercial Boilers, Steam Generators, and Process Heaters
  • 1146.2 (Amended May 5, 2006), Emissions of Oxides of Nitrogen from Large Water Heaters and Small Boilers and Process Heaters

Equipment Types Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Carbon Monoxide (CO)
Gaseous and Liquid-Fueled Stationary Engines – Emergency or Standby Power Uses 111ppm 301,2ppm 701ppm
Gaseous and Liquid-Fueled Stationary Engines –
Non-Emergency and Non-Standby Power Uses5
0.070 lbs/MW-hr3 0.10 lbs/MW-hr4 0.20 lbs/MW-hr3
Landfill and Digestor Gas-Fired Stationary Engines bhp>500: ppm = 36 x ECF1,6 Landfill Gas: 401,2
Digestor Gas: 250 x ECF1,2,6
2,000 ppm1
Natural-Gas-Fired, Fan-Type Central Furnaces (heating only with input rate less than 175,000 BTUH, or heating and cooling with cooling rate of less than 65,000 BTUH) 40 nanograms (calculated as NO2) per joule of useful heat delivered to the heated space    
Residential Type, Natural Gas-Fired Water Heaters 15 ppm7 or 10 nanograms (calculated as NO2) per joule of heat output    
Boilers, Steam Generators, Water Heaters, and Process Heaters
(rated heat input capacity less than or equal to 400,000 BTU per hour)
55 ppm7 or 40 nanograms (calculated as NO2) per joule of heat output    
Boilers, Steam Generators, Water Heaters and Process Heaters rated heat input capacity greater than 400,000 BTU per hour and less than or equal to 2,000,000 BTU per hour) 20 ppm7 or 40 nanograms (calculated as NO2) per joule of heat output   400 ppm
Boilers, Steam Generators, Water Heaters, and Process Heaters
(rated heat input capacity greater than 2,000,000 BTU per hour and less than 5,000,000 BTU per hour)
30 ppm7 or 0.037 pounds per million BTU of heat input   400 ppm7
Boilers, Steam Generators, Water Heaters, and Process Heaters
(rated heat input capacity greater than or equal to 5,000,000 BTU per hour)8,9
30 ppm7 or 0.036 pounds per million BTU of heat input   400 ppm7
Notes:

  1. Parts per million by volume, corrected to 15% oxygen on a dry basis and averaged over 15 minutes.
  2. Measured as carbon.
  3. The averaging time of the emission standards is 15 minutes.
  4. Mass emissions of VOC shall be calculated using a ratio of 16.04 pounds of VOC per lb-mole of carbon.
  5. Emissions limits shall be subject to adjustment for engines that produce combined heat and electrical power (see Rule 1110.2)
  6. ECF is the efficiency correction factor.
  7. Parts per million by volume, corrected to 3% oxygen on a dry basis.
  8. Capacity Factor greater than 25%.
  9. Units with a heat input capacity greater than 40 million BTU per hour and an annual heat input greater than 200 x 109 BTU per year shall have a continuous in-stack nitrogen oxides monitor or equivalent verification system in compliance with 40 CFR part 60 Appendix B Specification 2.

For engines of 1,000 bhp and greater, install, operate and maintain in calibration a NOX Continuous Emission Monitoring System (CEMS) with data gathering and retrieval capability.

Projects that do not contain combustion equipment are not eligible for this credit.

Important notes:

Eligibility: The pilot ACP is only available to projects from ENERGY STAR-eligible building types.

Project limit: There is a 500 project cap on participation in this pilot ACP.

Certification level cap: projects using this pilot ACP may not earn any points under EAc1 and are not able to achieve LEED certification beyond the Certified level.

Establishment

Conduct an analysis to identify any high priority retrofit needs and establish a shortterm plan that addresses the needs identified.

Performance

Demonstrate energy efficiency improvement, measured by source energy use intensity (EUI), of at least 20%, normalized for climate and building use. The percent reduction is determined by the project building’s energy reduction over the most recent 12 months, and data from three contiguous years of the previous five represents the baseline period. Buildings without four consecutive years of energy data are ineligible.

Credit Specific: The submittals for this pilot prerequisite may be downloaded here.

Establishment:

Provide a copy of the short-term plan that addresses the retrofit needs identified in the analysis.

Performance:
  1. Provide performance period dates; must be at least 12 consecutive months.
  2. Provide baseline period dates.
  3. Confirm that the baseline and performance period fall within the previous 5 years.
  4. Confirm project building square footage.
  5. Confirm Energy meter(s) that measured the entire energy use of the project building have been in place from the start of the baseline period, and that this was the data used to establish the project building's energy efficiency performance.
  6. Choose one of the following options for providing energy consumption data to USGBC:

    Option 1: The project team is sharing energy consumption data with USGBC through EPA’s ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, and understands that USGBC will check for the following information:

    • The project building’s baseline source energy use intensity (as provided by ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool) (kBTU/sf)

    • The project building’s performance period source energy use intensity (as provided by ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool) (kBTU/sf)
    • Project building’s ENERGY STAR rating
    • Use of the “Set Energy Performance Target” tool in Portfolio Manager and set a target, and the estimated target reduction (%).
    • If any energy performance improvements have been made during the performance period, the record of improvements in the “Track Energy Performance Improvements” tool in Portfolio Manager.

    Select how the project will share data with USGBC:

    • Verify that the project team has provided Master Account access to USGBC-LEEDPerformanceReporting.
    • OR

    • [This option is not yet available]
      Verify that the project team has authorized USGBC as their Energy Service Provider (ESP) for Automated Benchmarking Service (ABS) Note: Authorizing USGBC as an ESP will streamline how you share energy data with USGBC. When you authorize USGBC as an ESP to your ENERGY STAR portfolio manager account, you will be allowing USGBC to automatically and regularly pull your energy and water data (as long as it is maintained in Portfolio Manager), and will not have to send USGBC data in another format.

    OR
    Option 2: The project is sharing energy consumption data with USGBC by providing copies of the Portfolio Manager Web Pages that confirm :

    The project building’s baseline source energy use intensity (as provided by ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool) (kBTU/sf)

    • The project building’s performance period source energy use intensity (as provided by ENERGY STAR’s Portfolio Manager tool) (kBTU/sf)
    • Project building’s ENERGY STAR rating
    • Use of the “Set Energy Performance Target” tool in Portfolio Manager and set a target, and the estimated target reduction (%).
    • If any energy performance improvements have been made during the performance period, the record of improvements in the “Track Energy Performance
      Improvements” tool in Portfolio Manager.
    Background information

    Allowing owners who employ energy management best practices in their buildings to receive a LEED rating by reducing their energy consumption by 20% provides new opportunities for USGBC. This type of leadership can now be rewarded within LEED and supported by USGBC’s performance programs. Annual performance reports and recertification are perfectly suited for these types of buildings.

    Buildings entering LEED EB: O&M through this performance option are required to show continuous improvement through the LEED Recertification program. The recertification program allows USGBC to ensure that all buildings in LEED are maintaining leadership standards. Buildings addressed by this compliance path have the most to gain and will find the most value in maintaining their LEED certification; without them, the LEED Recertification Program will not be a strong market changing instrument.

    If we want LEED to drive significant reductions in energy use we are going to need the majority of buildings to reduce their energy use by 20% or more.

    Changes
    • 5/15/2012:
      Updated documentation form link and reformatted documentation requirement language.
    • 8/1/2013:
      Updated eligible project types to align with ENERGY STAR revisions

    Design and locate exterior noise sources1 for new and majorly renovated buildings so that project noise levels at the nearest property line or public right of way are a minimum of 5 dBA below the existing ambient noise levels without the project, and no more than 60 dBA. Ambient sound level shall be measured as a Day-Night Equivalent Level (Ldn), and future sound levels from the project shall be calculated. Project building equipment noise shall be evaluated with respect to existing levels, and mitigated as required to not exceed the levels set out above. Emergency equipment (e.g. generators) do not need to meet these noise requirements, however, an operations plan must be included to describe their schedule for periodic testing.

    1Noise sources may include building equipment mounted on the rooftop, inside building but exterior venting, or located at grade), transformers, traffic associated with the building, and other sources.

    Design and build the project to achieve all of the following features:

    • A principal functional entry on the front façade faces a public space, such as a street,1square, park, paseo,2 or plaza, but not a parking lot, and is connected to sidewalks or equivalent provisions for walking.
      • A historic building3is exempt if its historic principal functional entry does not face a public space and/or is not connected to sidewalks or equivalent provisions for walking, and the building cannot be modified without altering key historic features of the building.
      • To qualify as a public space, a square, park, or plaza must be at least 50 feet (15 meters) wide at a point perpendicular to the functional entry.
    • All street frontages have a minimum building-height-to-street centerline ratio of 1:1.5 (i.e. a minimum of 1 foot [300 millimeters] of building height for every 1.5 feet [450 millimeters] width from street centerline to building façade).
      • Non-motorized rights-of-way may be counted toward the requirement, but frontages facing those rights-of-way must have a minimum 1:0.5 ratio of building height to street width.
      • Building height is measured to eaves or the top of the roof for a flat-roof structure, and street centerline is measured from the façade. For building frontages with multiple heights or widths, use average heights or widths weighted by each segment’s linear share of the total block length.
      • Alleys4and driveways are excluded from these calculations.
      • A historic building is exempt from these requirements if its dimensions do not meet the ratio requirements.
    • Any new off-street parking lots are located at the side or rear of the building.
    • Continuous sidewalks or equivalent all-weather route for walking on the project site serve all building entrances and connect them with public sidewalks. Newly constructed sidewalks must be at least 8 feet (2.5 meters) wide on retail or mixed-use blocks and at least 4 feet (1.2 meters) wide on all other blocks. Equivalent provisions for walking include woonerfs5and all-weather-surface footpaths. Alleys and driveways are excluded from these calculations.
    • No more than 20% of the street frontage of the project is faced directly by garage and service bay openings. Alley access is used instead, if available.
    • If a façade extends along a sidewalk, no more than 40% of its length or 50 feet(15 meters), whichever is less, is blank (without doors or windows).
    • At-grade crossings with driveways account for no more than 10% of the length of sidewalks within the project
    • Street trees are provided between the vehicle travel way and walkway at intervals of no more than 450 feet (15 meters) (The width of driveways, utility
      vaults and alleyways intersecting the vehicle travel way or walkway may be excluded from these calculations).

    • 1a dedicated right-of-way that can accommodate one or more modes of travel, excluding alleys and paseos. A street is suitable for primary entrances and provides access to the front and/or sides of buildings and lots. A street may be privately owned as long as it is deeded in perpetuity for general public use. A street must be an addressable thoroughfare (for mail purposes) under the standards of the applicable regulating authority.
    • 2a publicly accessible pedestrian path, at least 4 feet wide and no more than 12 feet wide, that provides shortcuts between buildings and through the block, connecting street frontages to rear parking areas, midblock courtyards, alleys, or other streets. A paseo may be roofed for up to 50% of its length and may be privately owned or publicly dedicated.
    • 3a building or structure listed or determined to be eligible as a historic structure or building or structure or as a contributing building or structure in a designated historic district, due to its historic, architectural, engineering, archeological, or cultural significance. The building or structure must be designated as historic by a local historic preservation review board or similar body, be listed in a state register of historic places, be listed in the National Register of Historic Places, or have been determined eligible for listing in the National Register.
    • 4a publicly accessible right-of-way, generally located midblock, that can accommodate slow-speed motor vehicles, as well as bicycles and pedestrians. An alley provides access to the side or rear of abutting properties for loading, parking, and other service functions, minimizing the need for these functions to be located along streets. It may be publicly dedicated or privately owned and deeded in perpetuity for general public use.
    • 5a street, also known as a home zone, shared zone, or living street, where pedestrians have priority over vehicles and the posted speed limit is no greater than 10 miles per hour. Physical elements within the roadway, such as shared surfaces, plantings, street furniture, parking, and play areas, slow traffic and invite pedestrians to use the entire right-of-way.

    Changes:
    • Changes made based on feedback (03/15/2013):
      wording modifications & measurement clarifications
      public space qualification language added

    Comply with one of the Building Façade options, one of the Interior Lighting options, one of the Exterior Lighting options, and the Post-Construction Monitoring Plan requirements below.

    Building façade requirements

    Develop a building façade design strategy to make the building visible as a physical barrier and eliminate conditions that create confusing reflections to birds. If all materials on the building façade have a Threat Factor of 15 or below, the project is exempt from the building façade requirements and the following Bird Collision Threat Rating calculations are not required.

    Bird collision threat rating

    If any material on the building façade has a Threat Factor above 15, then the Bird Collision Threat Rating calculations are required. First separate the building into Façade Zone 1 or Façade Zone 2. Façade Zone 1 includes the first 3 floors above ground level, as well as 1 floor above any green roofs. Façade Zone 2 includes all façade areas above the 3rd floor. Then identify the Material Types present on the building façade and the Threat Factor of each type (for detailed material types and associated threat factors, see the Bird Collision Deterrence: Summary of Material Threat Factors table developed by the American Bird Conservancy). Determine the total area of each Material Type.

    No more than 15% of the glazed area in Façade Zone 1 can have a Threat Factor higher than 75. However, more than 15% of the glazed area in Zone 2 may have a Factor higher than 75. All glazed corners or fly-through conditions must have a Threat Factor less than or equal to 25.

    Using the formulas below, achieve a maximum total building Bird Collision Threat Rating (BCTR) of 15 or less.

    First, for each Façade Zone, perform the following calculation:

    [((Material Type 1 Threat Factor) x (Material Type Area)) + ((Material Type 2 Threat Factor) x (Material Type Area))…] / [Total Façade Zone Area] = Façade Zone BCTR

    Then determine the total building Bird Collision Threat Rating by performing the following calculation with the Zone 1 and Zone 2 BCTRs:

    [((Zone 1 BCTR) x 2) + (Zone 2 BCTR) ] / 3 = Total Building BCTR

    AND

    Interior Lighting Requirements

    Develop a lighting design strategy to effectively eliminate or reduce light trespass from the building. The lighting in all spaces with a direct line of sight to exterior fenestration shall meet at least one of these two options:

    Exterior lighting requirements

    Develop a lighting design strategy to effectively reduce or eliminate light trespass from exterior fixtures. Meet the exterior and garage lighting power density and controls requirements in sections 9.4.1.3, 9.4.1.7, 9.4.3, of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1- 2010 (with errata but without addenda).

    Post-construction monitoring plan requirements

    Develop a three-year post-construction monitoring plan to routinely monitor the effectiveness of the building design in preventing bird collisions. Include methods to identify and document locations of the building where repeated bird strikes occur, the number of collisions, the date, the approximate time (if known), and features that may be contributing to collisions. The plan should also provide a process for corrective action.

    Credit Specific

    Building Façade

    • If all materials on the building have a Threat Factor of 15 or below and the project did not perform the calculations, submit a narrative describing why the materials, and building in general, are “bird-friendly.” This includes a material list and supporting data.
    • A completed Bird Collision Threat Rating spreadsheet.
    • Plan(s) and/or elevation(s) depicting the location of all materials and shading/screening devices used to comply with this credit
    • Applicable specification details on all materials and shading/screening devices used to comply with this credit

    Interior Lighting

    Option 1:

    • A copy of the building operations guidelines text that stipulates that all interior lighting must be turned off by the appropriate nighttime personnel after hours when the space is unoccupied.

    Option 2:

    • Narrative, and drawings showing control locations, describing the lighting controls used on the interior lighting, the sequence of operation and how these controls comply with this credit and section 9 of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010

    Exterior Lighting

    Option 1:

    • A photometric report of those luminaires demonstrating that no light is emitted above 90 degrees from straight down in their final installed position(s).
    • Narrative, and drawings showing control locations, describing the lighting controls used on the exterior lighting, the sequence of operation and how these controls comply with this credit.

    Option 2:

    • All submittals required for the LEED for New Construction SS Credit, Light Pollution Reduction.

    Post-Construction Monitoring Plan
    ALL PROJECTS

    • A copy of the post-construction monitoring plan
    AND

    EBOM PROJECTS

    • Provide records of all collisions during the Performance Period. Include the location, date, and approximate time of day for each collision.
    • Plan(s) and/or elevation(s) depicting the location of all temporary and permanent materials and shading/screening devices used to retrofit the building façade in response to the results of the monitoring plan.
    • Applicable specification details on all temporary and permanent materials and shading/screening devices used to retrofit the building façade in response to the results of the monitoring plan.
    Control

    Have in place an automated and learning heating and cooling system that provides occupant control. The system must use usage and control data in an effort optimize comfort for the users.

    Have a plan to test and repair or replace devices or systems according to the manufacturer or developer’s recommended interval.
    Track and document the changes made by the learning system. Identify where comfort increased or decreased and if more or less energy was used as a result of the system’s changes.

    Feedback

    Have in place automated and learning heating and cooling controls that provide usage feedback. Feedback should be delivered through more than one mode of communication to inform the occupants about the actual thermal comfort trends in their workspace or residence.

    Feedback may be real time or through regular reporting mechanisms, but must be communicated at least on a monthly basis. Feedback must include contextual comparisons in text and visual displays

    Related Credit: Earn an additional point by achieving Pilot Credit 59: Occupant Engagement to educate and empower the occupants to engage in their thermal comfort and energy management.

    Credit Specific
    1. Narrative that addresses the installed system:

      1. Level of control be for occupants
      2. How individual thermostats will account for multiple user interaction
      3. How the thermostat’s learned patterns balance the individual user requests and the needs of the shared space
    2. Cutsheets for the product
    3. Floorplan identifying where each device is installed and what thermal zones each device controls
    4. Maintenance and calibration plan, including responsible parties
    5. If applicable, narrative that explains:
      1. The integration process of the tenant learning controls system and the base building system.
    6. Submit documentation for A, B, OR C:
      1. Narrative that addresses:

        1. Frequency and number of occupant comfort complaints since use of learning controls.
        2. Cost and energy savings, if any.
      2. OR

      3. Report out of metrics and/or quantitative data used to measure the success of the learning controls (e.g., records of complaint/report logs)
      4. OR

      5. Quantitative results of an occupant comfort survey.

Project teams may pursue the entire LEED v4 Materials and Resources category in place of the MR credits from LEED v2009. All prerequisites must be met.

Points awarded as follows:

If project earns ____ v4 points Receives_____ v2009 points
1 1
2 2
3 3
4 5
5 6
6 7
7 9
8 10
9 11
10 12
11 13
12 14
13 14 + 1 IN

Submittals
  1. Register for the Pilot ACP
  2. Complete all attempted MR credits using the LEED v4 sample forms available at www.usgbc.org/sampleforms and any required documentation from the v4 MR credits.
  3. Complete Survey Feedback – submit survey confirmation email
Product Manufacturer Supply Chain Optimization (1 point)

Project Team: Use building products that are sourced from product manufacturers who procure raw materials from suppliers meeting criteria below for at least 25%, by cost, of the total value of permanently installed products in the project.

Manufacturers: Engage in validated and robust safety, health, hazard, and risk programs. Document at least 99% by weight of the ingredients used to make the building product or building material are sourced from companies with independent third party verification of the following along the manufacturer supply chain:

  • Processes are in place to communicate and transparently prioritize chemical ingredients along the supply chain according to available hazard, exposure and use information to identify those that require more detailed evaluation
  • Processes are in place to identify, document, and communicate information on health, safety and environmental characteristics of chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to implement measures to manage the health, safety and environmental hazard and risk of chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to optimize health, safety and environmental impacts when designing and improving chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to communicate, receive and evaluate chemical ingredient safety and stewardship information along the supply chain
  • Safety and stewardship information about the chemical ingredients is publicly available from all points along the supply chain

For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost. For credit achievement calculation, the base contributing cost of individual products compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted to exceed 100% its total actual cost (before regional multipliers) and double counting of single product components compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted and in no case is a product permitted to contribute more than 200% of its total actual cost.

Structure and enclosure materials may not constitute more than 30% of the value of compliant building products.

Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?
All projects: Meet the following requirement:

Buildings must have at least one main stair that enables occupants to travel between the building entrance floor(s), occupant’s own destination floor and common use floors. Access to floors may be restricted by use of security devices, such as card keys, codes or other access devices.

AND

Include seven or more of the following features within the project:

For primary staircase(s) identified above*:

  1. Classify all regularly occupied floors for re-entry, allowing all building users to have access to and from these floors. Service floors do not need access for all users.
  2. Make accessible staircases visible from the corridor by either:
    • providing transparent glazing of at least 10 square feet (1 square meter) at all stair doors or at a side light
    • providing magnetic door holds on all doors leading to the stairs.
    • providing unenclosed stairs.
  3. Provide accessibility to at least one open or interconnecting staircase to at least 50% of the tenant/occupant floors for convenient pedestrian vertical circulation.
  4. Locate a main staircase to be visible from main building lobby and within 25 foot (7.5 meters) walking distance from any edge of the lobby. Ensure that no turns or obstacles prevent visibility of or accessibility to the qualifying staircase from the lobby.
  5. Locate a main staircase to be visible before an occupant visually encounters any motorized vertical circulation (elevator/escalator). The staircase must be visible from the principal point of entry at each building floor.
  6. Install architectural light fixtures that provide a level of lighting in the staircase(s) consistent with or better than what is provided in the building corridor.
  7. Provide daylighting at each floor/roof level of the stair(s) using either windows and/or skylights of at least 8 square feet (1 square meter) in size.
  8. Place signage encouraging stair use for health and other benefits at all elevator call areas, next to escalators and outside stairwells on each floor.
  9. Use inviting sensory stimulation such as artwork and/or music in stairwells.
  10. Elsewhere within the project:

  11. Provide exercise equipment or exercise opportunities for at least 5% of FTE occupants that can be used at employee workstations to allow workers opportunities for physical activity while working at their desks. Examples of appropriate exercise equipment include but are not limited to tread-desks, desk stationary bicycles, exercise ball chairs, desk stepper and others. A checkout system can be put in place to allow employees to check out equipment.
  12. Provide a dedicated or multi-use space to act as an on-site exercise room, which includes a variety of exercise equipment, for use by at least 5% of FTE occupants.

* Note: Ramps or other means of pedestrian vertical circulation also qualify for this category.

AND
For LEED for Homes multi-family and LEED for Schools projects:

Provide an onsite recreation space with exercise opportunities for both adults and children that is open and accessible to all residents. The space must be at least 400 square feet (37 square meters) for all buildings that have greater than 10 units or classrooms. Include adult exercise and children’s play equipment for a minimum of 5% of building occupants. Gardening activity space and equipment can also count as adult active recreation space and equipment.

Credit Specific:
  • Floor plan indicating:

    • location of the main stair(s)
    • minimum number tenant floors with accessibility to the staircase
    • staircase visibility and walking distance
    • staircase location along the principal path of travel
  • Based on the measures selected, provide the following:
    1. Signage indicating that the floors are classified for re-entry.
    2. Photographs or diagrams depicting the glazing or magnetic door holds
    3. Lighting diagrams indicating the light level equivalent between the stair-case and main building corridor,
    4. Stairwell diagrams indicating the size and location of windows and/or skylights.
    5. Lists of exercise equipment or exercise opportunities provided to FTE occupants and calculations indicating that the amount purchased can simultaneously serve than 5% of FTE.
    6. Floorplan showing recreation space provided to occupants.,
Additional Questions
  • To what extent would you have included these features if they were not rewarded via this Pilot credit?
  • How did the credit requirements change the floor plan layouts and other space distri-bution considerations?
  • Did the local building codes and/or zoning impede your achievement of any require-ments? If so, which and how?
  • How might project teams monitor the use of the stairs and/or exercise equipment or spaces?
  • What other design considerations would you suggest and/or have your included to motivate increased building occupant activity?
  • Did the local building codes and/or zoning codes facilitate your achievement of any requirements? If so, which and how?
Changes
  • 11/01/2013:
    clarified that stair requirements can be met using multiple "main stairs" and do not need to be met for auxiliary (non-main) stairs.
Material ingredient optimization

Use products that document their material ingredient optimization using the paths below for at least 25%, by cost, of the total value of permanently installed products in the project.

  • USGBC approved program. Products that comply with building product optimization criteria approved by USGBC.

  • GreenScreen v1.2 Benchmark. Products that have fully inventoried chemical ingredients to 100 ppm that have no Benchmark 1 hazards:
    • If any ingredients are assessed with the GreenScreen List Translator, value these products at 100% of cost.
    • If all ingredients are have undergone a full GreenScreen Assessment, value these products at 150% of cost.
  • Cradle to Cradle v2 Certified. End use products are certified Cradle to Cradle. Products will be valued as follows:
    • Cradle to Cradle Gold: 100% of cost
    • Cradle to Cradle Platinum: 150% of cost
  • Cradle to Cradle v3 Certified. End use products are certified Cradle to Cradle. Products will be valued as follows:
    • Cradle to Cradle Silver: 100% of cost
    • Cradle to Cradle Gold or Platinum: 150% of cost
  • International Alternative Compliance Path – REACH Optimization. End use products and materials that do not contain substances that meet REACH criteria for substances of very high concern. If the product contains no ingredients listed on the REACH Authorization1 or Candidate2 list, value at 100% of cost.

For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost. For credit achievement calculation, the base contributing cost of individual products compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted to exceed 100% its total actual cost (before regional multipliers) and double counting of single product components compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted and in no case is a product permitted to contribute more than 200% of its total actual cost.

Structure and enclosure materials may not constitute more than 30% of the value of compliant building products.

Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?
Option 1. material ingredient reporting (1 point)

Use at least 20 different permanently installed products from at least five different manufacturers that use any of the following programs to demonstrate the chemical inventory of the product to at least 0.1% (1000 ppm).

  • Manufacturer Inventory. The manufacturer has published complete content inventory for the product following these guidelines:

    • A publicly available inventory of all ingredients identified by name and Chemical Abstract Service Registration Number (CASRN)

    • Materials defined as trade secret or intellectual property may withhold the name and/or CASRN but must disclose role, amount and GreenScreen benchmark, as defined in GreenScreen v1.2.
  • Health Product Declaration. The end use product has a published, complete Health Product Declaration with full disclosure of known hazards in compliance with the Health Product Declaration open Standard.
  • Cradle to Cradle. The end use product has been certified at the Cradle to Cradle v2 Basic level or Cradle to Cradle v3 Bronze level.
  • USGBC approved program. Other USGBC approved programs meeting the material ingredient reporting criteria.
Option 1. Source reduction

Reduce wastewater from toilets and urinals by at least 50% from the baseline calculated in WE Prerequisite Fixture & Fitting Water Use Reduction for toilets and urinals only.

Percent reduction Points
50% 1
95% 1 (2nd point not available)

OR
Option 2. Reuse

Reuse building wastewater on site. Use water from approved non-potable sources including:

  • recycled wastewater (on-site or municipally supplied),
  • swimming pool backwash operations,
  • air conditioner condensate,
  • rainwater,
  • cooling tower blow-down water,
  • foundation drain water,
  • steam system condensate,
  • fluid cooler discharge water,
  • food steamer discharge water,
  • combination oven discharge water,
  • industrial process water,
  • fire pump test water
  • municipally supplied treated seawater
  • ice machine condensate

Reused water must meet the applicable local code, for its intended use (e.g., on-site irrigation, toilet flushing, cooling tower).

Strategy Points
Implement wastewater reuse 1
Reuse at least 90% of wastewater on site 1 (2nd point not available)

OR
Option 3. Resource recovery

Implement resource recovery and reuse of one or both of the following for up to 1 point::

Resource recovery type Points
nutrients (nitrogen and/or phosphorous) 1
organic carbon loading from building occupants 1 (2nd point not available)

Credit specific

Option 1:

  • Provide a narrative which includes the type of alternative technology and details about how it will be installed and operated for the project building. Systems that negatively offset the environmental benefits, such as those that have high energy use or high pollution rates will not be accepted.
  • Provide any applicable specifications, drawings, and calculations to show that the system significantly minimizes or eliminates the annual wastewater produced
    from sewage conveyance.
  • Process water reduction (i.e., from food service) may qualify for this credit, however, and additional explanation of the method must be provided.

Option 2:
Provide a narrative about the wastewater treatment/reuse system including:

  • whether it meets the local standard wastewater
  • source and reuse location (e.g, building graywater reused as toilet flushing water)
  • approximately what portion of the water type is being reused
  • Provide any applicable specifications or drawings to demonstrate the system design and location.

Option 3:
Provide a narrative explaining the resource recovery strategy used including:

  • Type of resource(s) recovered
  • Descriptions and specification on system used
  • Estimated annual quantity recovered
  • Estimated impact on total building resource production (i.e. approximately what percent of the identified resource is recovered).
Additional questions
  • Did the revisions to this credit make it more achievable for your project? For other projects?
  • Are there strategies that have been used on this or other projects that would be applicable to this credit? Explain.
Changes:
  • 1/15/2013: removed NSF 350 standard from requirements
Case 1. Single family

Complete all of the requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense Specification for Single-Family New Homes.

Case 2: Multi-Family & mid-rise

Meet all of the following:

  • All fixtures and fittings must meet the Water-Efficiency Criteria of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense Specification for Single-Family New Homes
  • Hot Water Delivery System – To minimize water wasted while waiting for hot water, the hot water distribution system shall be field tested to store no more than
    0.5 gallons (1.9 liters) of water in any piping/manifold between the hot water source and any hot water fixture. For projects with central water heating systems that serve multiple units, store no more than 0.5 gallons of water in any piping/manifold between the common hot water line and any hot water fixture.
  • Meet the Outdoor Water-Efficiency Criteria of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense Specification for Single-Family New Homes
  • Meet the performance testing requirements of WaterSense for New Homes, which include field verifying that all faucets and shower heads are performing at or below their rated volume, building water pressure is below 60 psi, no leaks are detectable in the plumbing supply system, and toilets are not leaking
HOMES

Note: Multi-family projects required to meet the Fair Housing Amendments Act (FHAA) (e.g., a building with ≥ 4 residential units and an elevator) may earn points in Option 1 if they have twice the number of accessible units that meet FHAA requirements than what is required by code.

Option 1. Universal design features

Meet all of the following:

  1. Zero-Step Main Entrance: Entrances with no abrupt change in level must provide access to dwelling units and site amenities.
  2. Accessible Doorway: A doorway must have a minimum clear width of open doorway of 32 inches and clear maneuvering space inside and outside the door.
  3. Accessible Passage: An accessible route is a path that is at least 36 inches wide, smooth, as level as possible, and without hazards or obstructions.
  4. Adaptable bathroom: Bathroom must have a minimum 30 inch x 48 inch clear floor space and standard accessible shower and toilet fixtures.
  5. Accessible HVAC and lighting controls: Controls such as thermostats and other heating, air-conditioning, and ventilation mechanisms as well as light switches and electrical outlets must be positioned no less that 15 inches from the floor and no higher than 48 inches with no access obstructions.
  6. A kitchen, dining area, living area, adaptable full bathroom, and bedroom on the accessible level.
AND/OR
Option 2. Open building structural systems

Allow for easy redefining of rooms/floorplans with minimal renovation and material waste. Meet both of the following:

  1. Centralized primary structural elements (such as “clear-span” structural design and partitions)
  2. Flexible ceiling or floor systems (such as suspended ceilings, open-web floor trusses, raised or plenum floors)
AND/OR
Option 3. Organized and accessible MEP systems

Meet one of the following:

  1. Stacked plumbing, electrical and mechanical design. Stacked or adjacent MEP layouts locate functional areas (like bathrooms, kitchens, and laundry areas for plumbing lines) vertically from floor to floor or in shared common walls on the same floor to provide access for installation and repairs, reduce redundant supply and space requirements, and ensure adaptable use of nonMEP spaces
  2. Separation of MEP systems from within exterior walls and primary interior structural members
MID-RISE

Projects required to meet the Fair Housing Amendments Act (FHAA) (e.g., a building with ≥ 4 residential units and an elevator) may earn points in if they have twice the number of accessible units that meet FHAA requirements than what is required by code.

Universal design features

Meet all of the following:

  1. Zero-Step Main Entrance: Entrances with no abrupt change in level must provide access to dwelling units and site amenities.
  2. Accessible Doorway: A doorway must have a minimum clear width of open doorway of 32 inches and clear maneuvering space inside and outside the door.
  3. Accessible Passage: An accessible route is a path that is at least 36 inches wide, smooth, as level as possible, and without hazards or obstructions.
  4. Adaptable bathroom: Bathroom must have a minimum 30 inch x 48 inch clear floor space and standard accessible shower and toilet fixtures.
  5. Accessible HVAC and lighting controls: Controls such as thermostats and other heating, air-conditioning, and ventilation mechanisms as well as light switches and electrical outlets must be positioned no less that 15 inches from the floor and no higher than 48 inches with no access obstructions.
  6. A kitchen, dining area, living area, adaptable full bathroom, and bedroom on the accessible level.
LEED for Homes Review Process

LEED for Homes projects: When complete, submit documentation here.

These requirements only apply to “acoustically sensitive” rooms, such as bedrooms, dining rooms, living rooms, and studies. (“Acoustically insensitive” rooms include bathrooms, kitchens, and hallways.) Projects may also implement the measures throughout the entire home.

Option 1. Prescriptive noise reduction methods.

Meet all of the following requirements:

  1. Mechanical systems must meet the following requirements:
    • Continuous ventilation fans shall have a maximum sound rating of 0.7 sones. Intermittent fans shall have a maximum sound rating of 1.5 sones, unless their maximum rated airflow exceeds 400 cfm. HVAC air handlers and remote-mounted fans are exempted, if the fans are mounted outside the habitable spaces, bathrooms, and hallways, and if there is at least 4 feet of ductwork between the fan and the intake grill.
    • Meet the following best-practice HVAC installation measures:
      • Ducts are securely attached (no loose connections between sections of ductwork).
      • The fan housing is securely anchored.
      • The damper flap closes fully, with no visible airspaces around the flap.
    • For projects that are less than a half a mile away from any significant noise source such as (but not limited to) aircraft over-flights, highways, trains, and industry, exterior assemblies must include:
      • Exterior windows and doors must have a minimum STC rating of 35.
      • All exterior wall penetrations must be sealed with acoustical sealant,
      • and/or otherwise treated for sound control (e.g. lined elbows on vents, lined exterior ducts where feasible).
    • Attached single family homes and multi-family homes must also meet the following:
      • Party walls must have a minimum STC rating of 55.
      • All party wall penetrations must be sealed with acoustical sealant
        • Floor/ceiling assemblies must have a minimum STC and IIC rating of 55.
AND/OR
Option 2. Performance-based compliance requirements

Meet all of the following. The tested levels must be met in the acoustically sensitive room that is considered the worst case condition.

  1. The maximum background noise level in the home or unit due to exterior noise sources cannot exceed 40 dBA, based on the peak hour Leq.
  2. The maximum background noise level in the home or unit due to interior noise sources (HVAC systems, lighting, and other building services operating simultaneously) shall not exceed 40 dBA, based on the peak Leq.
  3. Party walls must have a minimum NIC rating of 50.
  4. Floor-ceiling assemblies between units must have a minimum NIC and FIIC rating of 50.

Ductless systems qualify for this credit.

Identify activities and building functions that would benefit from the application of ergonomics in the selection of appropriate furnishings, equipment and education.

Consult current ergonomics standards and guidelines relevant to the tasks that will be performed in the building. For computer workstations, these include:

  • BIFMA G1-2002 (to be superseded by BIFMA G1-2011 when approved)
  • ANSI/HFES 100-2007
  • CSA Z412-00 (R2011)

For non-computer workstations these include:

  • Z1004-09, OSHA 3192-05N(2004)
  • OSHA 3182 (revised 2009)

Prior to designing the interior (including lighting, thermal environment, office layout, individual workstation design, furnishings and equipment) consult with and analyze occupant needs. Review potential design options with occupants.

Analyze these occupant needs:

  • User characteristics (age, size, shape, weight, ability/disability, gender)
  • Tasks performed (including relative importance and priority of tasks, frequency, duration)
  • Equipment and materials used along with storage requirements

Demonstrate that key interrelated ergonomic principles1 were incorporated into the interior design that facilitate occupant well-being (health, performance, and satisfaction).

Provide ergonomics education and training to all users upon installation of furniture and equipment.

1Key ergonomic interrelated principles include versatility and flexibility, fit, postural change, worker education and training, and maintainability and adaptability.

Credit specific:
  1. Strategic plan for a comprehensive ergonomics strategy outlining how each item will be achieved
  2. Document the two education sessions
  3. Example follow up survey

In place of the following LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance v2009 Energy and Atmosphere credits:

  • EA Prerequisite 1: Energy Efficiency Best Management Practices—Planning, Documentation, and Opportunity Assessment
  • EA Prerequisite 2: Minimum Energy Efficiency Performance
  • EA Credit 1: Optimize Energy Efficiency Performance
  • EA Credit 2.1 Existing Building Commissioning—Investigation and Analysis
  • EA Credit 2.2 Existing Building Commissioning—Implementation
  • EA Credit 2.3 Existing Building Commissioning—Ongoing Commissioning
  • EA Credit 3.2 Performance Measurement—System Level Metering

Follow the alternative compliance path guidance outlined in this document:

Credit Specific

Provide documentation for each EA credit based on the Documentation Guidance section of the ISO 50001 ACP supplemental document.

Use interior finishes and furnishings from manufacturers who have validated multiple environmental attributes relevant to the product via independent third party certifications and that have publically disclosed the product attributes on which the certification has been granted.
Use at least 5 different third party certified products which account for at least 50% of the total interior finishes and furnishing materials by cost.

Approved 3rd party certifications:

  • ANSI/BIFMA e3 – 2012 Furniture Sustainability Standard

    • Level 1 certified products contribute 25% of the total product cost
    • Level 2 certified products contribute 50% of the total product cost
    • Level 3 certified products contribute 100% of the total product cost
  • Other USGBC approved multi-attribute certification programs
Credit Specific

Determine the total value of all interior finishes and furnishings by adding the value of the hard costs of CSI MasterFormat 2004 Divisions 9 and 12. This includes cost associated with delivery of the product to the site, but excludes installation and labor costs. Provide a list of products purchased contributing toward credit and indicate the applicable label/certification. List the cost and number of items purchased per product and calculate the weighted value according to the values above. If compliant products are limited to only one CSI division, project teams are permitted to account for costs in that single division. Record table should include the following information for each product/material:

  • Name/Description
  • Manufacturer
  • Total Material Cost ($)
  • Availability of product “scorecard” (yes/no)
  • Percent of product compliant with 3rd party certification (% by Weight)
  • Compliant Product Value
Additional Questions
  • How difficult was it to locate the applicable level of labels receiving credit?
  • What were the major barriers to achieving credit performance? Do you think the threshold(s) is reasonable?
  • What labels would you like USGBC to consider for inclusion in this pilot credit?
Control

Have in place an automated and learning heating and cooling system that provides occupant control. The system must use usage and control data in an effort optimize comfort for the users.

Have a plan to test and repair or replace devices or systems according to the manufacturer or developer’s recommended interval.
Track and document the changes made by the learning system. Identify where comfort increased or decreased and if more or less energy was used as a result of the system’s changes.

Feedback

Have in place automated and learning heating and cooling controls that provide usage feedback. Feedback should be delivered through more than one mode of communication to inform the occupants about the actual thermal comfort trends in their workspace or residence.

Feedback may be real time or through regular reporting mechanisms, but must be communicated at least on a monthly basis. Feedback must include contextual comparisons in text and visual displays

Related Credit: Earn an additional point by achieving Pilot Credit 59: Occupant Engagement to educate and empower the occupants to engage in their thermal comfort and energy management.

Credit Specific
  1. Narrative that addresses the installed system:

    1. Level of control be for occupants
    2. How individual thermostats will account for multiple user interaction
    3. How the thermostat’s learned patterns balance the individual user requests and the needs of the shared space
  2. Cutsheets for the product
  3. Floorplan identifying where each device is installed and what thermal zones each device controls
  4. Maintenance and calibration plan, including responsible parties
  5. If applicable, narrative that explains:
    1. The integration process of the tenant learning controls system and the base building system.
  6. Submit documentation for A, B, OR C:
    1. Narrative that addresses:

      1. Frequency and number of occupant comfort complaints since use of learning controls.
      2. Cost and energy savings, if any.
    2. OR

    3. Report out of metrics and/or quantitative data used to measure the success of the learning controls (e.g., records of complaint/report logs)
    4. OR

    5. Quantitative results of an occupant comfort survey.

Pilot Credit 88: LEED O+M Starter Kit is a collection of Pilot Credits that BD+C projects can use in the Innovation in Design credit category for early pre‐approval of O+M prerequisites, streamlining the path into certification in LEED v4 for Operations + Maintenance.

Site Management Policy
Systems O+M Plan
Purchasing, Waste and Renovation Policies
Green Cleaning Policy and IPM Plan

Prerequisites and credits in the O+M rating system are divided between Establishment and Performance requirements. Establishment requirements are physical assets and policies that can be documented and approved once, and do not generally change substantially over time. Performance requirements involve cyclical actions or ongoing tracking during the Performance Period. Many of the Establishment requirements are included in the BD+C rating systems. The O+M Starter Kit consists of the remaining Establishment policy requirements that are not in the BD+C rating systems.

Stipulations:
  1. All versions and adaptations of BD+C rating systems may use the Starter Kit with the following caveats:

    1. Core & Shell projects must provide evidence that the credits have been developed with the participation of the property management team that will be responsible for their implementation.
    2. BD+C v4 projects cannot use the Systems O+M Manual credit because these requirements are already included in those rating systems.
  2. Teams can use any number of these Pilot Credits, in any number of ID credit slots not to exceed the number of Pilot Credits attempted. (All four can be submitted within one ID credit or each can be submitted in a separate ID credit.)
  3. Teams may continue to use similar, previously allowed strategies for ID credits, but streamlined approval in an eventual O+M certification will only be allowed if these Pilot Credits are used.

Pilot Credit 88: LEED O+M Starter Kit is a collection of Pilot Credits that BD+C projects can use in the Innovation in Design credit category for early pre‐approval of O+M prerequisites, streamlining the path into certification in LEED v4 for Operations + Maintenance.

Site Management Policy
Systems O+M Plan
Purchasing, Waste and Renovation Policies
Green Cleaning Policy and IPM Plan

Prerequisites and credits in the O+M rating system are divided between Establishment and Performance requirements. Establishment requirements are physical assets and policies that can be documented and approved once, and do not generally change substantially over time. Performance requirements involve cyclical actions or ongoing tracking during the Performance Period. Many of the Establishment requirements are included in the BD+C rating systems. The O+M Starter Kit consists of the remaining Establishment policy requirements that are not in the BD+C rating systems.

Stipulations:
  1. All versions and adaptations of BD+C rating systems may use the Starter Kit with the following caveats:

    1. Core & Shell projects must provide evidence that the credits have been developed with the participation of the property management team that will be responsible for their implementation.
    2. BD+C v4 projects cannot use the Systems O+M Manual credit because these requirements are already included in those rating systems.
  2. Teams can use any number of these Pilot Credits, in any number of ID credit slots not to exceed the number of Pilot Credits attempted. (All four can be submitted within one ID credit or each can be submitted in a separate ID credit.)
  3. Teams may continue to use similar, previously allowed strategies for ID credits, but streamlined approval in an eventual O+M certification will only be allowed if these Pilot Credits are used.

Develop and implement a plan to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions from nonroad and on-road diesel fueled vehicles, construction equipment, and temporary power generation used during construction projects.

The plan should include:

  1. Nonroad Diesel Engines

    For engines used on the jobsite that are 25 horsepower (HP) and greater, meet at least the equivalent of USEPA Tier 2 PM emission standards and the USEPA Tier 4 PM emission standard (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) as listed in the table below for the specified HP rating and during the specified calendar year. The equipment must meet the requirements listed for the current year the equipment is in use on the job site.

     
    Percent of Engines that Must Comply with Tier 4 PM Standard
    Year 25-74hp 75-174hp 175hp and above
    2012-2013 0% 25% 50%
    2014 25% 50% 95%
    2015 50% 95% 95%
    2016-2022 95% 95% 95%

    Compliance may be met with engines certified to meet the applicable USEPA Tier level, and/or equipment that has been retrofitted with technology verified to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the applicable USEPA Tier level. To the extent that retrofits are used to meet this requirement, the diesel retrofit technology used must be listed on the verified technology list for either the USEPA or the California Air Resources Board (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) current as of the time the equipment is first placed on the jobsite and must be installed and operated as designated by that verified list.

    Include measures for proper maintenance of the equipment to ensure continued future compliance with the emission standards.

  2. On-road Diesel Engines

    95% of all diesel engine contractor/ subcontractor vehicles used for the construction project must be:

    1. Vehicles that comply with USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards, or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.
    2. OR

    3. Vehicles with older engines that have been retrofitted with technology verified to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards for particulate matter. To the extent that retrofits are used to meet this requirement, the diesel retrofit technology used must be listed on the verified technology list for either the USEPA or the California Air Resources Board (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) current as of the time the vehicle is first placed on the jobsite and must be installed and operated as designated by that verified list.

    Include measures for proper maintenance of the vehicles to ensure continued future compliance with the emission standards.

  3. Idling Limitations

    Develop a policy to limit unnecessary vehicle and equipment engine idling to no more than 5 minutes, or in compliance with applicable local, state and national laws, whichever is more stringent. Include signage and operator communications/education.

  4. Prevention of Indoor Air Pollution

    Locate equipment, vehicles, and loading/unloading staging areas away from air intakes or operable openings of adjacent buildings.

  5. Equipment Information

    Include the following information for each piece of equipment, annually:

    1. Vehicle type
    2. Engine make
    3. Engine model number
    4. Serial number of engine
    5. Engine family name and model year
    6. Horse power and/or Kilowatts (for nonroad only)
    7. Current Tier level (for nonroad only)
    8. Serial number and VIN of vehicle
    9. Make and model number of USEPA/CARB verified emission control technology, if applicable (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.)
    10. Type of fuel used
    11. Number of use hours (if available)
Credit specific:
  • Copy of the particulate matter emissions reduction plan
  • Projects outside the U.S.: describe the equivalent standards used

Nonroad Diesel Engines

  • Horsepower rating, Tier 2 level, Tier 4 level for all equipment
  • Retrofitted equipment: describe the technology and methodologies used to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the applicable USEPA Tier level
  • Describe equipment maintenance measures that will be used, and how they will ensure continued compliance with the emission standards

On-Road Diesel Engines

  • Estimated number of on-road diesel engine contractor vehicles
  • Specifications for 95% of those vehicles that indicate compliance with USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards, or local equivalent
  • Retrofitted equipment: describe the technology and methodologies used to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards
  • Describe equipment maintenance measures that will be used, and how they will ensure continued compliance with the emission standards

Idling Limitations

  • Provide the policy that describes idling time limits; applicable local, state, and national laws; idling signage; and operator education plans

Prevention of Indoor Air Pollution

  • Information (plan or description) on the location of staging areas, air intakes, and operable openings of buildings
  • Information on how the location of the equipment staging areas prevents indoor air pollution

Equipment Information

  • Product manuals or specifications for the equipment that depict the characteristics listed in the requirements. Projects should maintain an annual inventory of equipment information.
Additional questions:
  1. The goal of this credit is to minimize particulate matter emissions and impacts from construction equipment. Do you believe that these requirements achieve this intent? Why or why not?
  2. Were there barriers to implementing the strategies used in this credit?
  3. Did you encounter difficulties in gathering the information for the idling plan implementation? If so, in what ways?
  4. For item 2 of the plan, is it feasible to require that on-road trips be tracked rather than on-road vehicles? Would this be difficult to track?
  5. How many pieces of equipment were used for this project? How many were owned by the contractor? How many were leased/rented?
  6. What was the entire project budget?
  7. In order to meet the pilot credit criteria, which actions below were taken above and beyond what would have been taken absent the effort to earn Clean Construction Pilot Credit for LEED?
  8. How many pieces of leased/rented equipment were used in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  9. How many pieces of your existing equipment were retrofitted with diesel emissions reduction technology in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  10. How many pieces of new equipment were purchased in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  11. How many pieces of used equipment were purchased in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  12. When were these pieces of equipment slated to be retired in the company’s business plan?

This prerequisite is available for pilot testing by the following LEED rating systems and building types:

  • New Construction

    • Office
    • Multi-family Residential
    • Lodging
    • Warehouses
  • Retail NC (excluding restaurants)
  • Schools (excluding laboratories within school buildings)
  • Commercial Interiors
  • Retail CI (excluding restaurants)
  • Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance
    • Office
    • Retail (excluding restaurants)
    • Multi-family Residential
    • Lodging
    • Schools (excluding laboratories within school buildings)
    • Warehouses

Project types not listed above that are interested in pursuing this path, should contact USGBC before registration. See below for more information.

Note: The following Pilot Credit modifications apply to this prerequisite:
  • Introductory phone call between project teams pursuing this path and GBCI reviewers.
  • Project teams pursuing this pilot prerequisite will be required to fulfill all prerequisite requirements. Unlike with other pilot credits, documenting that a pilot credit is in need of major revision and in unachievable in its current form will not demonstrate compliance for IEQp1.
  • No ID points will be awarded.
  • If a project team registers and submits documentation noting that space in the project fails testing (chemical or perceived), corrective action must be taken until the project meets all requirements; it will not be acceptable to pursue the Ventilation Rate Procedure in IEQp1 once evidence of not meeting the pilot requirements is submitted. If, however, a project team decides that this path is too costly or otherwise onerous prior to submission, they may go back and use the traditional IEQp1 path.
  • BD+C and ID+C projects will still need to meet local code requirements for ventilation if they differ from the IAQP.

Meet the minimum requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2007, Sections 4 through 6, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (with errata). Determine the minimum outdoor air intake flow for mechanical ventilation systems using the In-door Air Quality Procedure, or a local equivalent, whichever is more stringent.

Combining the IAQP and VRP is not an acceptable means of compliance with this pilot prerequisite.

Prohibit smoking in the building.

Meet the following requirements for ventilation systems designed in accordance with Section 6.3 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedure:

  1. Contaminant Sources. Identify the outdoor sources, indoor sources, and the expected emission rate for each of the contaminants and mixtures of concern listed in Table 1. Additionally, confirm that the top 10 contaminants by concentration in the building, as identified by mass spectrograph analysis, are included in Table 1. If they are not already included in Table 1, list them.
  2. Contaminant Concentration. Refer to Table 1 for maximum allowable concentration limits for each contaminant of concern.
  3. Perceived Indoor Air Quality. At least 80% of observers or occupants must determine the perceived indoor air quality to be “acceptable” using a Subjective Evaluation.
  4. Design Approach. If adjustments will be made to the outdoor air flow rate, use mass balance analysis. Determine minimum outdoor airflow rates per steady-state mass-balance in Appendix D of the standard. Measure system level airflow rates before and after modifications are made.
  5. Non-Dilution Air Cleaning Technology. If non-dilution air cleaning technol-ogy is utilized, use air cleaning technology consisting of sorptive active agents, in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 145.2-2011, Laboratory Test Method for Assessing the Performance of Gas-Phase Air-Cleaning Systems: Air Cleaning Devices. If electronic air cleaning technology is preexisting, continuous ozone monitoring shall be provided. Electronic air cleaning cannot be used as a means of chemical contaminant control.
  6. Air Testing. Conduct contaminant-level testing for each of the contaminants of concern as follows:
    1. Each contaminant of concern shall be measured using the test methods in Table 1. If the top 10 contaminant concentrations are not listed in Table 1, separately mitigate these contaminants or provide a ruling by a cognizant health body that they have no known adverse health impact. Testing is to be completed during time of anticipated peak contaminant loading by an appropriately accredited professional. Use current versions of ASTM standard methods or ISO methods. The number of sampling locations depends on the size of the building and number of ventilation systems, but must include the entire building and all representative space uses.
    2. All measurements within each location shall demonstrate compliance with the maximum allowable concentration limits per Table 1. For each sampling point where the concentration exceeds the limit, take corrective action and retest for the noncompliant contaminants as the sampling points. Repeat until all requirements are met.
    3. Provide testing frequency as follows:
      • For initial certification, the testing must occur within the performance period.
      • For recertification, the testing must occur no less frequently than every two years. Project teams may test more frequently at their discretion.
      • Construction projects within an existing building must comply with the requirements under this prerequisite for ID+C projects.
      • Any adjustments to outside air volumes required to comply with the maximum allowable concentration limits must be implemented within the performance period. Outside air measurements at the affected air handling units must confirm the adjustments.
    4. Confirm complete implementation of maintenance plans for the following contaminants or document status of “no further remediation” required:
      • Asbestos Containing Materials (ACMs)
      • Lead
      • Radon
      • Mold
  7. Subjective Evaluation. Distribute a seven-point scale questionnaire to at least 30% of the space/building occupants as described in IEQ Credit 2.1 Occupant Comfort – Occupant Survey. The questionnaire is to be designed to address perceived air quality particularly focusing on odors and irritation responses.
  8. Maintenance Program. Implement and maintain an HVAC system maintenance program to ensure the proper operations and maintenance of HVAC components as they relate to outdoor air introduction and exhaust. Include any non-dilution methods used.
  9. System Testing. Test and maintain operation of all building exhaust systems, including bathroom, kitchen and parking exhaust systems.
Table 1.

Contaminant Compound (CAS#) Concentration Limit
(µg/m3)
Test Method
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
Acetaldehyde 75-07-0 140 ISO 16017-1, 2;
ISO 16000-3, 6;
ASTM D6345-10
Benzene 71-43-2 60
Carbon disulfide 75-15-0 800
Carbon tetrachloride 56-23-5 40
Chlorobenzene 108-90-7 1000
Chloroform 67-66-3 300
Dichlorobenzene (1,4-) 106-46-7 800
Dichloroethylene (1,1) 75-35-4 70
Dimethylformamide (N,N-) 68-12-2 80
Dioxane (1,4-) 123-91-1 3000
Epichlorohydrin 106-89-8 3
Ethylbenzene 100-41-4 2000
Ethylene glycol 107-21-1 400
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether 110-80-5 70
Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate 111-15-9 300
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether 109-86-4 60
Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate 110-49-6 90
Formaldehyde 50-00-0 33 BS-ISO 16000-3, 4; ASTM D5197;
BS ISO 16000-4
Hexane (n-) 110-54-3 7000 ISO 16017-1, 2;
ISO 16000-3, 6;
ASTM D6345-10
Isophorone 78-59-1 2000
Isopropanol 67-63-00 7000
Methyl chloroform 71-55-6 1000
Methylene chloride 75-09-2 400
Methyl t-butyl ether 1634-04-4 8000
Naphthalene 91-20-3 9
Phenol 108-95-2 200
Propylene glycol monomethyl ether 107-98-2 7000
Styrene 100-42-5 900
Tetrachloroethylene 127-18-4 35
Toluene 108-88-3 300
Trichloroethylene 79-01-6 600
Vinyl acetate 108-05-4 200
Xylenes-total 108-38-3, 95-47-6, and 106-42-3 700
Inorganics
Carbon Monoxide 9 ISO 4224
Ozone 147 (0.075 ppm) ISO 13964; ASTM D5149-02
Particulate Matter PM2.5 15 ISO 7708
Ammonia 200 NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods
Carbon Dioxide 700 above outdoor ppm EPA compendium infared

EBOM specific:

In addition to the above, meet the following additional requirements:

Establishment
  1. Provide a copy of the building maintenance plan implementing a regular IAQ Performance Method compliant with this Pilot Prerequisite. Describe the ventilation maintenance program, including a description of the periodic checks and scheduled maintenance performed, and whether the checks are manual, based on a building automation system, or both.
  2. Confirm that the project team has performed or overseen tests in all project building exhaust systems during the performance period to verify proper function.
Performance period
  1. Documentation provided must confirm that required performance period miles-tones have been completed within the stated performance period for the project building.
  2. If adjustments are made to the outdoor air flow, provide a table listing system level air flow rates before and after adjustments are made.
Additional questions
  • Would the team apply this method to another building in the future? Why/why not?
  • How did the cost of this method compare to the cost of the Ventilation Rate Procedure?
Background Information

Subjective evaluation - Panel

Panel participants may be regular occupants of the project building, visitors to the build-ing (i.e. customers of a retail establishment), or individuals with no connection to the project building. Composition of the panel in this regard is at the discretion of the project team.

Responses are to be collected via anonymous methods either written or electronic. The Perceived Indoor Air Quality test is considered “passing” if 80% or more of the panel renders the space “acceptable” at each interval. If less than 80% of the panel renders the space “acceptable”, appropriate corrective actions must be implemented to correct the deficiency. Corrective actions must be implemented within six (6) months of the con-clusion of the panel observations.
Subjective evaluation - Questionnaire

The questionnaire is to be designed to address perceived air quality particularly focusing on odors and irritation responses. The responses shall be tabulated. Respondent answers of -1, -2, or -3 on the seven-point scale will be considered as dissatisfied. If more than 20% of respondents are dissatisfied, appropriate corrective actions must be implemented during the performance period.

For EB: O+M projects, at least one occupant survey must be conducted during each monitoring period.

Space sampling for testing

Randomly select spaces to be tested, ensuring that each occupiable space type is adequately represented. Utilize HERS sampling methodologies for multi-family and lodging projects or APPA sampling methodologies for offices, retail, schools, warehouses, and existing buildings.

  1. Minimum area and space counts noted in the applicable sampling methodology MUST be met.

    1. For HERS sampling procedures, randomly select one in seven (1 in 7) substan-tially similar spaces. Each sample group would consist of identical spaces, one out of every seven of which are to be tested. A minimum of three tests must be conducted in each sample group.
    2. For APPA, randomly select locations totaling at least 10% of the gross floor area of the building and 10% of the total count of substantially similar spaces provided at least five (5) spaces of each space type are included. For any space types with less than five (5) spaces, include all spaces of that type.
  2. Note: different occupiable space types may be combined into common groups if the contaminants and mixtures of concern within those space types are expected to be the same with similar emission rates and the spaces are served by the same ventilation system.

For purposes of determining how many test locations are required, the following shall govern:

  1. Testing must occur in at least one location per ventilation system, per occupiable space type. The location(s) selected for testing must represent the worst-case zone(s) where the highest concentrations of contaminants of concern are likely to occur.

    1. For offices, retail, schools, lodging, multi-family residential, and existing buildings, testing must occur within areas no larger than 5,000 square feet. For warehouses or large open spaces within other building types (i.e. ballrooms in lodging, gymnasiums in schools, etc.) a limit of 50,000 square feet may be used. If there is evidence that the air within the space is well-mixed and sources of contaminants of concern are uniform, project teams may test a single location within that space. Evidence would consist of one of following:

      1. Engineering verification of HVAC system with uniform ventilation distribution, and uniform source of contaminants within that space.
      2. Tracer gas analysis showing uniform air distribution, and initial contaminant measurements showing uniform levels of contaminants of concern.
    2. Real-time sensors may be used to identify the worst-case zones for contaminants of concern; however, final testing results must be measured using the protocols below. Real-time sensor testing is not acceptable for final testing results.
    3. Locations selected may be served by more than one ventilation system provided that each ventilation system serving the location is designed in accordance with Section 6.3.
Additional Resources
  1. Reference to CHiPS database of contaminant generation rates
  2. Spreadsheet Calculator for compliance purposes
  3. Flow chart of compliance steps
  4. Example Surveys
  5. CEC/LBNL report, “Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for “Big Box” stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios”. It is available here

Develop and implement a plan to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions from nonroad and on-road diesel fueled vehicles, construction equipment, and temporary power generation used during construction projects.

The plan should include:

  1. Nonroad Diesel Engines

    For engines used on the jobsite that are 25 horsepower (HP) and greater, meet at least the equivalent of USEPA Tier 2 PM emission standards and the USEPA Tier 4 PM emission standard (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) as listed in the table below for the specified HP rating and during the specified calendar year. The equipment must meet the requirements listed for the current year the equipment is in use on the job site.

     
    Percent of Engines that Must Comply with Tier 4 PM Standard
    Year 25-74hp 75-174hp 175hp and above
    2012-2013 0% 25% 50%
    2014 25% 50% 95%
    2015 50% 95% 95%
    2016-2022 95% 95% 95%

    Compliance may be met with engines certified to meet the applicable USEPA Tier level, and/or equipment that has been retrofitted with technology verified to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the applicable USEPA Tier level. To the extent that retrofits are used to meet this requirement, the diesel retrofit technology used must be listed on the verified technology list for either the USEPA or the California Air Resources Board (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) current as of the time the equipment is first placed on the jobsite and must be installed and operated as designated by that verified list.

    Include measures for proper maintenance of the equipment to ensure continued future compliance with the emission standards.

  2. On-road Diesel Engines

    95% of all diesel engine contractor/ subcontractor vehicles used for the construction project must be:

    1. Vehicles that comply with USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards, or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.
    2. OR

    3. Vehicles with older engines that have been retrofitted with technology verified to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards for particulate matter. To the extent that retrofits are used to meet this requirement, the diesel retrofit technology used must be listed on the verified technology list for either the USEPA or the California Air Resources Board (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) current as of the time the vehicle is first placed on the jobsite and must be installed and operated as designated by that verified list.

    Include measures for proper maintenance of the vehicles to ensure continued future compliance with the emission standards.

  3. Idling Limitations

    Develop a policy to limit unnecessary vehicle and equipment engine idling to no more than 5 minutes, or in compliance with applicable local, state and national laws, whichever is more stringent. Include signage and operator communications/education.

  4. Prevention of Indoor Air Pollution

    Locate equipment, vehicles, and loading/unloading staging areas away from air intakes or operable openings of adjacent buildings.

  5. Equipment Information

    Include the following information for each piece of equipment, annually:

    1. Vehicle type
    2. Engine make
    3. Engine model number
    4. Serial number of engine
    5. Engine family name and model year
    6. Horse power and/or Kilowatts (for nonroad only)
    7. Current Tier level (for nonroad only)
    8. Serial number and VIN of vehicle
    9. Make and model number of USEPA/CARB verified emission control technology, if applicable (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.)
    10. Type of fuel used
    11. Number of use hours (if available)
Credit specific:
  • Copy of the particulate matter emissions reduction plan
  • Projects outside the U.S.: describe the equivalent standards used

Nonroad Diesel Engines

  • Horsepower rating, Tier 2 level, Tier 4 level for all equipment
  • Retrofitted equipment: describe the technology and methodologies used to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than the applicable USEPA Tier level
  • Describe equipment maintenance measures that will be used, and how they will ensure continued compliance with the emission standards

On-Road Diesel Engines

  • Estimated number of on-road diesel engine contractor vehicles
  • Specifications for 95% of those vehicles that indicate compliance with USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards, or local equivalent
  • Retrofitted equipment: describe the technology and methodologies used to reduce particulate emissions to a level at or more stringent than USEPA model year 2007 on-road standards
  • Describe equipment maintenance measures that will be used, and how they will ensure continued compliance with the emission standards

Idling Limitations

  • Provide the policy that describes idling time limits; applicable local, state, and national laws; idling signage; and operator education plans

Prevention of Indoor Air Pollution

  • Information (plan or description) on the location of staging areas, air intakes, and operable openings of buildings
  • Information on how the location of the equipment staging areas prevents indoor air pollution

Equipment Information

  • Product manuals or specifications for the equipment that depict the characteristics listed in the requirements. Projects should maintain an annual inventory of equipment information.
Additional questions:
  1. The goal of this credit is to minimize particulate matter emissions and impacts from construction equipment. Do you believe that these requirements achieve this intent? Why or why not?
  2. Were there barriers to implementing the strategies used in this credit?
  3. Did you encounter difficulties in gathering the information for the idling plan implementation? If so, in what ways?
  4. For item 2 of the plan, is it feasible to require that on-road trips be tracked rather than on-road vehicles? Would this be difficult to track?
  5. How many pieces of equipment were used for this project? How many were owned by the contractor? How many were leased/rented?
  6. What was the entire project budget?
  7. In order to meet the pilot credit criteria, which actions below were taken above and beyond what would have been taken absent the effort to earn Clean Construction Pilot Credit for LEED?
  8. How many pieces of leased/rented equipment were used in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  9. How many pieces of your existing equipment were retrofitted with diesel emissions reduction technology in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  10. How many pieces of new equipment were purchased in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  11. How many pieces of used equipment were purchased in each horsepower category? What were the tier levels for each of these?
  12. When were these pieces of equipment slated to be retired in the company’s business plan?
All projects: Meet the following requirement:

Buildings must have at least one main stair that enables occupants to travel between the building entrance floor(s), occupant’s own destination floor and common use floors. Access to floors may be restricted by use of security devices, such as card keys, codes or other access devices.

AND

Include seven or more of the following features within the project:

For primary staircase(s) identified above*:

  1. Classify all regularly occupied floors for re-entry, allowing all building users to have access to and from these floors. Service floors do not need access for all users.
  2. Make accessible staircases visible from the corridor by either:
    • providing transparent glazing of at least 10 square feet (1 square meter) at all stair doors or at a side light
    • providing magnetic door holds on all doors leading to the stairs.
    • providing unenclosed stairs.
  3. Provide accessibility to at least one open or interconnecting staircase to at least 50% of the tenant/occupant floors for convenient pedestrian vertical circulation.
  4. Locate a main staircase to be visible from main building lobby and within 25 foot (7.5 meters) walking distance from any edge of the lobby. Ensure that no turns or obstacles prevent visibility of or accessibility to the qualifying staircase from the lobby.
  5. Locate a main staircase to be visible before an occupant visually encounters any motorized vertical circulation (elevator/escalator). The staircase must be visible from the principal point of entry at each building floor.
  6. Install architectural light fixtures that provide a level of lighting in the staircase(s) consistent with or better than what is provided in the building corridor.
  7. Provide daylighting at each floor/roof level of the stair(s) using either windows and/or skylights of at least 8 square feet (1 square meter) in size.
  8. Place signage encouraging stair use for health and other benefits at all elevator call areas, next to escalators and outside stairwells on each floor.
  9. Use inviting sensory stimulation such as artwork and/or music in stairwells.
  10. Elsewhere within the project:

  11. Provide exercise equipment or exercise opportunities for at least 5% of FTE occupants that can be used at employee workstations to allow workers opportunities for physical activity while working at their desks. Examples of appropriate exercise equipment include but are not limited to tread-desks, desk stationary bicycles, exercise ball chairs, desk stepper and others. A checkout system can be put in place to allow employees to check out equipment.
  12. Provide a dedicated or multi-use space to act as an on-site exercise room, which includes a variety of exercise equipment, for use by at least 5% of FTE occupants.

* Note: Ramps or other means of pedestrian vertical circulation also qualify for this category.

AND
For LEED for Homes multi-family and LEED for Schools projects:

Provide an onsite recreation space with exercise opportunities for both adults and children that is open and accessible to all residents. The space must be at least 400 square feet (37 square meters) for all buildings that have greater than 10 units or classrooms. Include adult exercise and children’s play equipment for a minimum of 5% of building occupants. Gardening activity space and equipment can also count as adult active recreation space and equipment.

Credit Specific:
  • Floor plan indicating:

    • location of the main stair(s)
    • minimum number tenant floors with accessibility to the staircase
    • staircase visibility and walking distance
    • staircase location along the principal path of travel
  • Based on the measures selected, provide the following:
    1. Signage indicating that the floors are classified for re-entry.
    2. Photographs or diagrams depicting the glazing or magnetic door holds
    3. Lighting diagrams indicating the light level equivalent between the stair-case and main building corridor,
    4. Stairwell diagrams indicating the size and location of windows and/or skylights.
    5. Lists of exercise equipment or exercise opportunities provided to FTE occupants and calculations indicating that the amount purchased can simultaneously serve than 5% of FTE.
    6. Floorplan showing recreation space provided to occupants.,
Additional Questions
  • To what extent would you have included these features if they were not rewarded via this Pilot credit?
  • How did the credit requirements change the floor plan layouts and other space distri-bution considerations?
  • Did the local building codes and/or zoning impede your achievement of any require-ments? If so, which and how?
  • How might project teams monitor the use of the stairs and/or exercise equipment or spaces?
  • What other design considerations would you suggest and/or have your included to motivate increased building occupant activity?
  • Did the local building codes and/or zoning codes facilitate your achievement of any requirements? If so, which and how?
Changes
  • 11/01/2013:
    clarified that stair requirements can be met using multiple "main stairs" and do not need to be met for auxiliary (non-main) stairs.
Product Manufacturer Supply Chain Optimization (1 point)

Project Team: Use building products that are sourced from product manufacturers who procure raw materials from suppliers meeting criteria below for at least 25%, by cost, of the total value of permanently installed products in the project.

Manufacturers: Engage in validated and robust safety, health, hazard, and risk programs. Document at least 99% by weight of the ingredients used to make the building product or building material are sourced from companies with independent third party verification of the following along the manufacturer supply chain:

  • Processes are in place to communicate and transparently prioritize chemical ingredients along the supply chain according to available hazard, exposure and use information to identify those that require more detailed evaluation
  • Processes are in place to identify, document, and communicate information on health, safety and environmental characteristics of chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to implement measures to manage the health, safety and environmental hazard and risk of chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to optimize health, safety and environmental impacts when designing and improving chemical ingredients
  • Processes are in place to communicate, receive and evaluate chemical ingredient safety and stewardship information along the supply chain
  • Safety and stewardship information about the chemical ingredients is publicly available from all points along the supply chain

For credit achievement calculation, products sourced (extracted, manufactured, and purchased) within 100 miles (160 km) of the project site are valued at 200% of their base contributing cost. For credit achievement calculation, the base contributing cost of individual products compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted to exceed 100% its total actual cost (before regional multipliers) and double counting of single product components compliant with multiple responsible extraction criteria is not permitted and in no case is a product permitted to contribute more than 200% of its total actual cost.

Structure and enclosure materials may not constitute more than 30% of the value of compliant building products.

Additional questions
  1. Did your project use the actual or default materials cost to determine the total materials cost?
  2. How did your team determine or estimate the actual materials cost? What method was used?
  3. Where there any challenges in determining the total materials cost? What were they?
  4. If applicable, how would using the actual materials cost verses the default materials cost have effected credit achievement?
Option 1: Food production

Provide for onsite food production: vegetable gardens and/or edible nut- and fruit-bearing plants appropriate to the site

Dedicate a portion of the site to food production. Size the area using one of the following metrics:

BD+C, ID+C or EBOM projects (except Schools)

  • At least 10% of the site’s vegetated area
  • At least 1,500 square feet of hydroponic area
  • At least 50% of usable roof top space (excluding mechanical equipment, etc.)
  • At least 3,000 cubic feet of vertical farming or vertically stacked agriculture (length x width x height)
  • At least one square foot per Full Time Equivalent (excluding visitors)

LEED for Homes or Mid-Rise projects:

  • 200 square feet per single family home
  • 100 square feet per unit for multifamily

Schools Projects:

  • 500 square feet in facility of less than 500 students
  • 1,000 square feet in facility of 500 – 1,000 students
  • 1,500 square feet in facility of over 1,000 students

All projects except Homes:

The project must use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) processes. Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented.

AND for Schools:

For educational purposes, food growing areas must be at least 50% of square footage requirements. The provision of agricultural space must be complemented by programmatic areas nearby and designed for students to congregate. Programmatic areas could include but are not limited to classrooms and cafeterias.

Homes & Multifamily Mid-rise:

Multifamily projects must use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) processes. Ensure that there are no deed restrictions that prohibit food production on the residential properties. Permanent infrastructure must be provided. As applicable, provide solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.

Option 2: Community Supported Agriculture

Purchase shares in a community-supported agriculture (CSA) program for at least 50% of the occupants or 80% of the residential units within the project. Shares must be delivered to the project site on a regular schedule not less than twice per month and at least six months of the year. A three-year commitment to the program must be documented.

Option 3: Support an existing farm

Project proponent

  • Provide financial support to the farm equivalent to ¼ of 1% of the total project construction cost. Or, provide material support in kind, equivalent to the dollar value – materials to be negotiated with the farm.
  • Provide minimum 8 hours per Full Time Employee equivalent (FTE) per year to volunteer in farm operations - on the project proponent’s time. Hours could be consolidated, allowing some FTE to work more and others to not participate in the food production project. FTE volunteers would be required to follow farm training, minimum 1 hour (included within the 8 hour volunteer time). Time must be allocated by employers out of the standard work week, rather than weekend or evening hours.
  • For both financial support and FTE, a commitment for three years support/participation would be required.

Material support in kind could include fencing, soil, compost, construction materials, tools, etc.

Farm training could be in planting, harvesting, maintenance, or other operations: skilled labor is in demand in farms, unskilled labor is not as useful.

See the Resources tab of this pilot credit for recommendations on soil testing, fertilizer and herbicide use.

Credit specific
Option 1:
  • Site plan highlighting food production locations, access points, and water sources
  • Area calculations (in square feet), showing that the food production areas make up at least 10 percent of the site’s vegetated area
  • Site, greenhouse, and /or roof plan with dimensions and calculations demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production.
  • Supplemental documentation confirming the permanent infrastructure, including, as applicable: solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.
  • A narrative describing the IPM process in the garden(s).
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner. (not required for Homes)
Option 1 Schools:

Schools projects provide the following:

  • Site, greenhouse, and /or roof plan with dimensions and calculations demonstrating the amount of area reserved for food production.
  • Supplemental documentation confirming the permanent infrastructure, including, as applicable: solar access, fencing, watering systems, garden bed enhancements (such as raised beds), secure storage space for tools, and pedestrian access for these spaces.
  • A narrative describing the IPM process in the garden(s).
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building owner.
  • Outline of the lesson plans used to teach students about community food production.
  • A narrative explaining the garden maintenance plan for school breaks.
Option 2: Community Supported Agriculture
  • A copy of the contract or letter of commitment for the three-year CSA agreement.
  • A narrative or drawing confirming the location of the pick-up area within the site and the location of the CSA farm.
  • Calculations demonstrating the number of occupants or residential units in the program.
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner.
Option 3: Support an Existing Farm
  • Evidence of financial or material support, such as:

    • a copy of the signed contract with the farm that includes the amount of financial donation or specific materials donated, and the length of commitment
    • a receipt showing transactions and time period to which they apply

  • Outline of LEED project construction cost
  • Evidence of volunteer hours, such as:
    • a copy of the signed contract with the farm that includes the amount and type of volunteer hours proposed, training, when the volunteering would occur, and who would be volunteering
    • a list and short description of volunteer hours already provided, including training, who volunteered, and when it took place
  • A signed letter confirming the three-year commitment to the program by the building / tenant space owner.
Changes
  • 11/01/2013:
    Revised to allow options from EBOM to be used by all project types. Added LEED for Homes requirements.
  • 04/04/2014:
    removed "urban" from "urban farm" in option 3

Have all heating, cooling, and ventilation systems commissioned by a technician with North American Technician Excellence certification, HVAC contractor credentialed by an EPA-recognized HVAC Quality Installation Training and Oversight Organization (H-QUITO) (or equivalent as defined by USGBC). The technician must complete the ENERGY STAR for Homes, version 3, HVAC system quality installation contractor checklist, or equivalent as defined by USGBC.

Credit specific:
  • Completed HVAC installer checklist, and list installer’s name, company, and credential
Additional questions:
  • Was it challenging to find an qualified installer?
  • Did the HVAC installer charge the project extra to complete the checklists? If yes, how much?

This credit awards one point to projects that undertake a process to identify community needs related to equity for vulnerable populations and develop strategies for the project to assist the community in meeting those needs.

Option 1
Project team creates community engagement and support.

Team shall:

  • Identify stakeholders within the community, with a particular focus on vulnerable populations, defined as those who might be directly or indirectly impacted by the project in either positive or negative ways, and who are socio-economically disadvantaged and overburdened due to increased susceptibility/ sensitivity, differential exposure, differential preparedness, or differential ability to recover. Use both publically available data (typically available at the county, city or occasionally census track level), as well as direct outreach to local community groups, neighborhood organizations, religious organizations, labor groups or groups working in your neighborhood to help identify and access vulnerable populations.
  • AND

  • Perform a Community Needs Assessment, including a direct community engagement process, before the completion of programming that explores how the project can support social equity within the surrounding community. The process should be based on principles for high-quality stakeholder engagement such as AA 1000 Accountability Principles and Stakeholder Engagement Standards (AA1000SES): an open-source framework for quality stakeholder engagement.
  • AND

  • Document how the results of Community Needs Assessment were implemented in the eventual design or programming of the project, including strategies implemented for addressing specific stakeholder needs.

Strategies may include but are not limited to dedicated space or resources within the building or project boundary or dedicated space or resources located off-site but funded or supported by the project. Other strategies are those that would address needs in the areas of accessibility, community, human health, jobs, quality of life, etc. Strategies may be codified in a community benefits agreement.

OR

Option 2
Complete The SEED Evaluator* Parts 1 and 2

The SEED (Social Economic Environmental Design) Network is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting a “culture of civic responsibility and engagement in the built environment and the public realm.” The SEED Evaluator is a tool to help “designers, project developers, community leaders and others who desire a common standard to guide, measure, evaluate and certify the social, economic and environmental impact of design projects.” The SEED Evaluator is available on-line for free when you create an account. It consists of three parts which are required for SEED Certification. Only the first two parts are required for achievement of this pilot credit because the third part may not be completed until well after project occupancy (http://seednetwork.org).

OR

Option 3
Achieve Enterprise Green Communities Certification.

Enterprise Community Partners is a non-profit organization dedicated to financing, developing and supporting affordable housing in the US. The Enterprise Green Communities Criteria is a green building certification system designed specifically for affordable housing (http://www.enterprisecommunity.com/solutions-and-innovation/enterprise-g...).

Option 4
USGBC-approved equivalent

*The following are links to Organizations/Standards discussed in this credit:

Submittals

General

Register for the pilot credit

Credits 83-103

Documentation/Submittals:

Option 1:

Provide the following information:

  • Description of community included in the community needs assessment, including:
    • Data sources used
    • Organizations and individuals engaged in the process
    • Names and of individuals and stakeholder groups contacted
  • Summary of stakeholder engagement process, including:
    • Methods used for community engagement, including methods for reaching hard to reach vulnerable populations
    • Information about each engagement event, including event dates and times, attendee lists, agenda and minutes or meeting summaries, and copies of any additional collateral such as flyers, surveys, websites, etc.
  • Summary of findings from the Community Needs Assessment, including:
    • Primary stakeholder goals
    • Primary stakeholder needs
    • Summary of project strategies proposed to support community goals and needs
  • Summary of how community needs have been addressed within the project. Include specific metrics, such as (but not limited to):
    • Square footage and description of dedicated or shared community space
    • Summary of programming, including types of activities, target audience, hours of operation, community access points, etc.
  • Commitment to support community uses or activities long term, including copy of Community Benefit Agreement, if applicable.
Option 2:

Provide a copy of the SEED Evaluator* Parts 1 and 2 documentation.

Option 3:

Provide a copy of Enterprise Green Communities Certification

Option 4:

USGBC-approved equivalent

Survey Questions for Project Teams:
  1. What aspects of the credit were easiest? Most difficult? Impossible? What revisions would you recommend to address these shortcomings?
  2. What challenges did you face in identifying community stakeholders? In making or maintaining contact? In engaging active participation?
  3. Describe whether your project is urban, suburban, rural, tribal, etc. What are the surrounding densities? What radius did you use to determine surrounding communities?
  4. In what country is your project located? Are there any programs or requirements within this country that are similar to the requirements of this credit? If so, were you able to use or leverage that program? Why or why not?
  5. How helpful was the reference standard AA 1000 Accountability Principles and Stakeholder Engagement Standards (AA1000SES) in designing your community engagement process? What other resources did you use to design and implement the process?
  6. Who was in charge of the community engagement process? Did you hire any outside experts or practitioners? Did your team have the skills to successfully implement all aspects of this credit? If not, what was missing and how did you address any shortcomings?
  7. What challenges did you face in translating community goals and needs into strategies that could be successfully implemented by the project?
  8. If projects chose not to attempt this credit, was it because it seemed too difficult or because it did not reflect their project’s goals or some other reason?

This credit addresses equity for people involved in the ownership, design, and construction of the project by achieving one of the following:

Option 1

Project demonstrates commitment to equity for construction workers through workforce pay and benefits by achieving both of the following:

  1. Paying worker wages and benefits that meet or exceed the prevailing wage determined by the Federal Davis-Bacon Act, or applicable State prevailing wage statutes, whichever is higher. For projects located outside the United States, prevailing wage is defined as the most commonly paid wage for each type of work in the project’s region (i.e. the mode average; it will vary based on job and region, and is generally substantially higher than a legal minimum wage). Statistics on average wages may be available from government labor agencies, labor organizations, or other sources.
  2. AND

  3. Participation in, or providing of access to workforce development training through one or more of the following.
    1. Job-Related Skills training through on the job training in a Department of Labor registered apprenticeship program*
    2. Life-Skills training programs conducted on the construction site including such things as, GED test preparation, English as second language (ESL) courses, financial literacy, debt management, first-time home buying, or entrepreneurship training
    3. Financial assistance in the form of scholarships, stipends, or sponsorships for workers to attend life-skills training programs conducted off-site such as pre-apprenticeship training, English as a second language (ESL) courses, GED test preparation, financial literacy, debt management, first-time home buying, or entrepreneurship training
    4. USGBC-approved equivalent

OR

Option 2

Project team companies have demonstrated social responsibility on a company level by achieving certification, or developing a social responsibility report, based on the organizations below.

Portions of at least one member company of project team must achieve certification(s) or develop a report(s) in the following proportions:

  • Owner / Investors - 50% or more of the investors/owners (by dollar value of ownership)
  • OR

  • Design team - 20% or more of the design team (by dollar value of design contracts)
  • OR

  • Construction team - 20% of construction contracts (by dollar value)
  • Owners / Investors may include institutions (e.g. government agencies, universities, etc.) or private companies. In the case where the intended Owner does not own more than 50% of the project (e.g. in the case of investor-backed private real-estate development projects), companies investing in the project should be considered part of the “project team” for the purposes of this credit. Investment Funds, Real Estate Investment Trusts, and other investors may contribute to meeting the credit threshold based on their share of financial equity in the project and their completion of a certification or report.

    Certifications/reporting must address the following issues at a minimum:

    Human rights

    • No child / forced labor / bonded labor
    • Health and safety procedures and training
    • Right of freedom of association
    • Non-discrimination
    • Diversity and equal opportunity
    • Discipline / harassment and grievance procedures
    • Fair working hours and compensation
    • Anti-corruption and bribery

    Community/Society impacts

    • Responsible investment
    • Training and education
    • Anti-collusive behavior
    • Supplier assessment
    • Community involvement

    Frameworks to be utilized may be from one of the following organizations:

    Submittals

    General

    Register for the pilot credit

    Credits 83-103

    Documentation/Submittals:

    Option 1:
    • a. Provide a signed statement from the General Contractor / Construction Manager (as applicable) certifying that 60% or more of the construction value was performed by contractors paying worker wages and benefits that meet or exceed the prevailing wage determined by the Federal Davis-Bacon Act, or applicable State prevailing wage statutes.
    • b- 1.) Provide a signed statement and calculations from the General Contractor/ Construction Manager (as applicable) demonstrating that 15% or more of total project construction hours were performed by participants in registered apprenticeship programs.
    • b-2.) Provide a signed statement and narrative from the General Contractor / Construction Manager (as applicable) describing the on-site training program. Include the contact information for the training provider including contact name, organization, email, phone, and website, number of sessions provided, and total attendance. Submit course schedule demonstrating one course per month for the duration of construction, at minimum.
    • b-3.) Provide copies of company policy/agreements demonstrating the dollar value and nature of the assistance available to employees, with a signed statement and calculations from the General Contractor / Construction Manager (as applicable) certifying that 60% or more of the construction value was performed by contractors providing financial assistance to employees to attend off-site training programs.
    Option 2:

    Provide a spreadsheet for the ownership or design or construction team structure listing all equity shareholders or design or construction contract holders and the percent of equity shares or total contract value held by each participant, including subconsultants and subcontractors down to 5% of contract or equity value. Identify the participants counting towards the 50% or 20% threshold, and provide a copy of the relevant certificate or report meeting the listed standards. See the example below for reporting the ownership structure and means of meeting credit requirements; similar tables can be used for the design or construction team.

    Participant Name Percent of ownership / design contract / construction contract Certification / Report
    Example: Real Estate Development Partners, Inc. 30% B Corporation (certificate required)
    Example: Pension Fund Real Estate Holdings, Inc. 30% GRI report (submittal required)
    Example: BPA Holdings 20% -
    Example: The Smith REIT 20% -
    Survey Questions for Project Team:
    1. Where is your project located? Did location make a difference in compliance with the credit requirements?
    2. Did pursuing this credit generate debate, discussion or adoption of new practices intended to benefit social equity, or did standard practice (e.g. for government projects) allow your team to meet the requirements? Please provide detail.
    3. Did pursuing this credit influence selection of project team members? If so, how?
    4. Are there other issues related to social equity within the project team -- but not covered by the certifications listed -- that you think should be given credit in addition to the pathways included in this pilot version?
    5. Are the metrics and thresholds for achievement appropriate for the path pursued? If no, what would be a better metric, or threshold and why?
    6. Are the option paths equivalent? If no, please explain.
    7. Does this one credit adequately address issues of compensation and social equity in the project team? If no, please explain.
    8. Should the Option Paths remain in one credit, or split into multiple credits? If multiple credits are necessary, please explain.
    *The following are links to Organizations/Standards discussed in this credit:

    Department of Labor registered apprenticeship program
    http://www.doleta.gov/OA/apprenticeship.cfm

    JUST
    justorganizations.com

    B Corp.
    bcorporation.net

    GRI
    globalreporting.org/resourcelibrary/GRI-G4-Construction-and-Real-Estate-Sector- Disclosures.pdf

    GRESB
    Gresb.com

    AA 1000 Accountability Principles and Stakeholder Engagement Standards (AA1000SES): an open-source framework for quality stakeholder engagement
    http://www.accountability.org/standards/aa1000ses/index.html)

    OECD guidelines
    http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/48004323.pdf

    ISO 26000
    http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail?csnumber=42546

    UN Global Compact
    http://www.unglobalcompact.org/AboutTheGC/index.html

    SA 8000
    http://www.sa-intl.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.ViewPage&PageID=937

    AASHE STARS
    http://www.stars.aashe.org

    This credit addresses social equity for those involved in the production of materials and products used in the project, including the stages of raw materials extraction, processing, manufacturing, and assembly of final components and products.

    Projects must use permanently installed products1 from at least 10 different manufacturers that meet one of the following options2.

    Option 1 – Supplier Assessment

    Establish and distribute supplier assessments or scorecards, which may include self-assessments, and document return of completed assessments from Tier 1 suppliers (or suppliers further up the supply chain) comprising 75% of each manufacturer’s total direct material spend for a consecutive 12-month period within the previous 2 years. Qualifying assessments must be from the manufacturer’s Tier 1 suppliers directly responsible for extraction of raw materials or the processing / manufacturing / sub-assembly of materials and products in the manufacturers’ supply chains. Brokers, distributors, inventory management providers, etc. to the manufacturer are not counted towards the credit, however, assessments may be passed through them to qualifying suppliers.

    The assessment must address at minimum the following social responsibility elements below3 :

    • No child / forced / bonded labor
    • Health and safety procedures and training
    • Right of freedom of association
    • Non-discrimination
    • Discipline / harassment and grievance procedures
    • Fair working hours and compensation
    • Anti-corruption and bribery

    Each assessment must be signed by the CEO or CFO of the qualifying supplier company (or the CEO/CFO’s designee) or must be verified by a third-party.

    Manufacturer must also complete an assessment that is signed by the CEO or CFO of the company (or the CEO/CFO’s designee) or complete an assessment that is verified by a third-party.

    OR

    Option 2: Code of Conduct

    Document completion and acceptance of a Supplier Code of Conduct, based on criteria from an internationally recognized social responsibility guideline or standard, by Tier 1 suppliers comprising at least 50% of each manufacturer’s total direct material spend1 for a consecutive 12-month period within the previous 2 years. Qualifying Tier 1 suppliers are those that are directly responsible for the extraction of raw materials or the processing / manufacturing / sub-assembly of materials and products in the manufacturers’ supply chains. Brokers, distributors, inventory management providers, etc. to the manufacturer are not counted towards the credit, however, assessments may be passed through them to qualifying suppliers.

    This Code of Conduct must address the total supply chain and the Tier 1 suppliers must require those in their supply chains to comply with this Code. The Code of Conduct must include at minimum the following social responsibility elements4 :

    • No child / forced / bonded labor
    • Health and safety procedures and training
    • Right of freedom of association
    • Non-discrimination
    • Discipline / harassment and grievance procedures
    • Fair working hours and compensation
    • Anti-corruption and bribery

    Each Code of Conduct must be signed by the CEO or CFO of the qualifying supplier company (or the CEO/CFO’s designee).

    Manufacturer must also complete a Code of Conduct that is signed by the CEO or CFO of the company (or the CEO/CFO’s designee) or must complete a Code of Conduct that is verified by a third-party.

    Submittals

    General

    Register for the pilot credit

    Credits 83-103

    Documentation / Submittals

    Option 1 (Supplier Assessment) – the following are required to document achievement of this credit
    1. For each manufacturer,
      1. a spreadsheet that lists:
        1. All Tier 1 suppliers
        2. Spending for each supplier (or percentage of total)
        3. Indication of whether or not supplier has submitted signed Assessment
        4. Total spending (for calculating 75% of total)
        5. AND

      2. 5 signed assessment documents that address criteria listed in the credit (additional assessments may be requested) AND
      3. Manufacturer’s signed assessment document
    2. OR

    3. For each manufacturer, documentation of certification under ANSI/BIFMA e3-2014e Furniture Sustainability Standard, including achievement of Section 8.7.2.1 plus submittal of a manufacturer policy on freedom of association.
    4. OR

    5. Other program approved by USGBC
    Option 2 (Supplier Code of Conduct)

    The following are required to document achievement of this credit

    1. For each manufacturer,
      1. a spreadsheet that lists:
        1. All Tier 1 suppliers
        2. Spending for each supplier (or percentage of total)
        3. Indication of whether or not supplier has submitted signed Code of Conduct
        4. Total spending (for calculating 50% of total) AND
      2. 5 signed Code of Conduct documents that address criteria listed in the credit (additional Code of Conduct documents may be requested) AND
      3. Manufacturer’s signed Code of Conduct
    2. OR

    3. For each manufacturer, documentation of certification under ANSI/BIFMA e3-2014e Furniture Sustainability Standard, including achievement of Section 8.7.2.2 plus submittal of a manufacturer policy on freedom of association.
    4. OR

    5. Other program approved by USGBC
    Survey Questions for Project Teams:
    1. What aspects of the credit were easiest? Most difficult? Impossible? What revisions would you recommend to address these shortcomings?
    2. Where is your project located? Did location make a difference in compliance with the credit requirements?
    3. Did location of suppliers make a difference in compliance with manufacturers’ requests for self-assessments or Codes of Conduct? Were manufacturers successful in obtaining these documents from suppliers in social equity “hot spots”?
    4. Were manufacturers already collecting any of this information? If so, for internal purposes or for other reporting (include other certifications, compliance with laws or regulations, etc.)?
    5. In addition to BIFMA standard with inclusion of freedom of association, are there other comparable standards that USGBC should consider as alternative compliance paths?
    6. If projects chose not to attempt this credit, was it because it was deemed to be too difficult or because it did not reflect their project’s goals or some other reason?

    1 This credit is consistent with definitions in the MR section. “Permanently installed building products” are defined as products and materials that create the building or are attached to it. If furniture is included in MR credit calculations, it may be included in this credit. Some specific products that are part of MEP systems but are “passive” (meaning not part of the active portions of the system) may be included in credit calculations. This allows flexibility for the optional assessment of piping, pipe insulation, ducts, duct insulation, conduit, plumbing fixtures, faucets, showerheads, and lamp housings. Special equipment, such as elevators, escalators, process equipment, and fire suppression, systems, is excluded from the credit calculations. Also excluded are products purchased for temporary use on the project, like formwork for concrete.

    2 Development of this credit was informed by ANSI/BIFMA e3-2014e Furniture Sustainability Standard.

    3 See definitions appended to the credit.

    4 See definitions appended to the credit.

Join LEEDuser

Ask questions, share tips, and get notified of new forum posts by joining LEEDuser, a tool developed by BuildingGreen and supported by USGBC!

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on LinkedIn
  • Print to PDF
Sample forms
View sample forms

0 commentsLeave a comment

Leave a comment Don't have an account? Create one

You must be signed in to leave a comment.