Please upgrade your browser. This site requires a newer version to work correctly. Read more
Our "watch" feature allows you to stay current on all aspects of this specific credit. In your account, you can control what you get updated on and how you receive your notifications. Hide

Site development - protect and restore habitat

SS5.1 | Possible point

Intent

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve native plants, wildlife habitat, wetlands, and water bodies.

To restore native plants, wildlife habitat, wetlands, and water bodies that have been harmed by previous human activities.

To conserve native plants, wildlife habitat, wetlands, and water bodies.

Conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

Conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

Conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

Conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

Conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve native plants, wildlife habitat, wetlands, and water bodies.

To restore native plants, wildlife habitat, wetlands, and water bodies harmed by previous human activities.

To conserve native plants, wildlife habitat, wetlands, and water bodies.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

Requirements

During the performance period, have in place native1 or adapted vegetation2 covering a minimum of 25% of the total site area (excluding the building footprint) or 5% of the total site area (including the building footprint), whichever is greater.

Improving and/or maintaining off-site areas with native or adapted plants can contribute toward earning this credit provided the improvement and maintenance are documented in a contract with the owner of the off-site area. Every 2 square feet off-site can be counted as 1 square foot on-site.

Other ecologically appropriate features that contribute to this credit are natural site elements beyond vegetation that maintain or restore the ecological integrity of the site, including water bodies, exposed rock, unvegetated ground or other features that are part of the historic natural landscape within the region and provide habitat value.

Case 1. Greenfield sites1

Limit all site disturbance to the following parameters:

  • 40 feet (12 meters) beyond the building perimeter and parking garages;
  • 10 feet (3 meters) beyond surface walkways, patios, surface parking and utilities less than 12 inches (30 centimeters) in diameter;
  • 15 feet (4.5 meters) beyond primary roadway curbs and main utility branch trenches;
  • 25 feet (8 meters) beyond constructed areas with permeable surfaces (such as pervious paving areas, stormwater detention facilities and playing fields) that require additional staging areas to limit compaction in the constructed area.
Case 2. Previously developed2 areas or graded sites

Restore or protect a minimum of 50% of the site (excluding the building footprint) or 20% of the total site area (including building footprint), whichever is greater, with native or adapted vegetation.3 Projects earning SS Credit 2: Development Density and Community Connectivity may include vegetated roof surface in this calculation if the plants are native or adapted, provide habitat, and promote biodiversity.

Projects with limited landscape opportunities may also donate offsiteland in perpetuity, equal to 60% of the previously developed area (including the building footprint), to a land trust within the same EPA Level III Ecoregion identified for the project site. The land trust mustadhere to the Land Trust Alliance 'Land Trust Standards andPractices' 2004 Revision.

1 Greenfield sites are sites not previously developed or graded that could support open space, habitat, or agriculture..

2 Native or adapted plants are plants indigenous to a locality or cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds.

Case 1. Greenfield sites1

Limit all site disturbance to the following parameters:

  • 40 feet (12 meters) beyond the building perimeter and parking garages;
  • 10 feet (3 meters) beyond surface walkways, patios, surface parking and utilities less than 12 inches (30 centimeters) in diameter;
  • 15 feet (4.5 meters) beyond primary roadway curbs and main utility branch trenches;
  • 25 feet (8 meters) beyond constructed areas with permeable surfaces (such as pervious paving areas, stormwater detention facilities and playing fields) that require additional staging areas to limit compaction in the constructed area.
Case 2. Previously developed2 areas or graded sites

Restore or protect a minimum of 50% of the site area, excluding the building footprint, or 20% of the total site area, including building footprint, whichever is greater, with native or adapted vegetation.3

Projects earning SS Credit 2, Development Density and Community Connectivity, may include vegetated roof surface in this calculation if the plants are native or adapted, provide habitat, and promote biodiversity. Projects earning SS Credit 9.1, Connection to the Natural World—Outdoor Places of Respite, may apply the planted areas to this calculation, if the plants are native or adapted, provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

Projects with limited landscape opportunities may also donate offsite land in perpetuity, equal to 60% of the previously developed area (including the building footprint), to a land trust within the same EPA Level III Ecoregion identified for the project site. The land trust must adhere to the Land Trust Alliance 'Land Trust Standards and Practices' 2004 Revision.

1 Greenfield sites are sites not previously developed or graded that could support open space, habitat, or agriculture..

2 Native or adapted plants are plants indigenous to a locality or cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds.

Case 1. Greenfield sites1

Limit all site disturbance to the following parameters:

  • 40 feet (12 meters) beyond the building perimeter and parking garages;
  • 10 feet (3 meters) beyond surface walkways, patios, surface parking and utilities less than 12 inches (30 centimeters) in diameter;
  • 15 feet (4.5 meters) beyond primary roadway curbs and main utility branch trenches;
  • 25 feet (8 meters) beyond constructed areas with permeable surfaces (such as pervious paving areas, stormwater detention facilities and playing fields) that require additional staging areas to limit compaction in the constructed area.
Case 2. Previously developed2 areas or graded sites

1 Greenfield sites are sites not previously developed or graded that could support open space, habitat, or agriculture..

2 Native or adapted plants are plants indigenous to a locality or cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds.

Option 1. Sites without significant habitat or wetlands and water bodies

Locate the project on a site that does not have significant habitat, as defined in Option 2 of this credit, or land within 100 feet (30 meters) of such habitat, and fulfill the requirements of Options 1 or 2(a) under SLL Prerequisite 3, Wetland and Water Body Conservation.

OR

Option 2. Sites with significant habitat

Work with both the state’s Natural Heritage Program and the state fish and wildlife agency, or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S, to delineate identified significant habitat on the site. Do not disturb significant habitat or portions of the site within an appropriate buffer around the habitat. The geographic extent of the habitat and buffer must be identified by a qualified biologist, a conservation organization, or the appropriate state, regional, or local agency. Protect significant habitat and its identified buffers from development in perpetuity by donating or selling the land, or a conservation easement on the land, to an accredited land trust, conservation organization, or relevant government agency (a deed covenant is not sufficient to meet this requirement).

Identify and commit to ongoing management activities, along with parties responsible for management and funding available, so that habitat is maintained in preproject condition or better for a minimum of three years after the project is built out. The requirement for identifying ongoing management activities may also be met by earning SLL Credit 9, Long-Term Conservation Management of Wetlands and Water Bodies.

Significant habitat for this credit includes the following:

  1. Habitat for species that are listed or are candidates for listing under state or federal endangered species acts, habitat for species of special concern in the state, and/or habitat for those species and/or ecological communities classified as GH, G1, G2, G3, and/or S1 and S2 species by NatureServe (local equivalent standards for threatened and endangered species may be used by projects outside the U.S. if the site area is not covered by NatureServe data).
  2. Locally or regionally significant habitat of any size, or patches of predominantly native vegetation at least 150 acres (60 hectares) (even if part of the area lies outside the project boundary).
  3. Habitat flagged for conservation under a regional or state conservation or green infrastructure plan.
Option 3. Sites with wetlands and water bodies

Design the project to conserve 100% of all water bodies, wetlands, land within 100 feet (30 meters) of water bodies, and land within 50 feet (15 meters) of wetlands on the site. Using a qualified biologist, conduct an assessment, or compile existing assessments, showing the extent to which those water bodies and/or wetlands perform the following functions: (1) water quality maintenance, (2) wildlife habitat protection, and (3) hydrologic function maintenance, including flood protection. Assign appropriate buffers [not less than 100 feet (30 meters) for water bodies and 50 feet (15 meters) for wetlands] based on the functions provided, contiguous soils and slopes, and contiguous land uses. Do not disturb wetlands, water bodies, or their buffers, and protect them from development in perpetuity by donating or selling the land, or a conservation easement on the land, to an accredited land trust, conservation organization, or relevant government agency (a deed covenant is not sufficient to meet this requirement). Identify and commit to ongoing management activities, along with parties responsible for management and funding available, so that habitat is maintained in preproject condition or better for a minimum of three years after the project is built out. The requirement for identifying ongoing management activities may also be met by earning SLL Credit 9, Long-Term Conservation Management of Wetlands and Water Bodies. The project does not meet the requirements if it has negative effects on habitat for species identified in Option 2(a).

For all projects

The following features are not considered wetlands, water bodies, or buffer land that must be protected:

  1. Previously developed land.
  2. Man-made water bodies (such as industrial mining pits, concrete-lined canals, or stormwater retention ponds) that lack natural edges and floors or native ecological communities in the water and along the edge
  3. Man-made linear wetlands that result from the interruption of natural drainages by existing rights-of-way.
  4. Wetlands that were created incidentally by human activity and have been rated “poor” for all measured wetland functions. Wetland quality assessment must be performed by a qualified biologist using a method that is accepted by local, state or regional permitting agencies.

Using only native plants, restore predevelopment native ecological communities, water bodies, or wetlands on the project site in an area equal to or greater than 10% of the development footprint. Work with a qualified biologist to ensure that restored areas will have the native species assemblages, hydrology, and other habitat characteristics that likely occurred in predevelopment conditions. Protect such areas from development in perpetuity by donating or selling the land, or a conservation easement on the land, to an accredited land trust or relevant public agency (a deed covenant is not sufficient to meet this requirement). Identify and commit to ongoing management activities, along with parties responsible for management and funding available, so that restored areas are maintained for a minimum of three years after the project is built out or the restoration is completed, whichever is later. The requirement for identifying ongoing management activities may also be met by earning SLL Credit 9, Long-Term Conservation Management of Wetlands and Water Bodies. The project does not meet the requirements if it has negative effects on habitat for species identified in Option 2(a) of SLL Credit 7, Site Design for Habitat or Wetland and Water Body Conservation.

Create and commit to implementing a long-term (at least ten-year) management plan for new or existing on-site native habitats, water bodies, and/or wetlands and their buffers, and create a guaranteed funding source for management. Involve a qualified biologist or a professional from a natural resources agency or natural resources consulting firm in writing the management plan and conducting or evaluating the ongoing management. The plan must include biological objectives consistent with habitat and/or water resource conservation, and it must identify (1) procedures, including personnel to carry them out, for maintaining the conservation areas; (2) estimated implementation costs and funding sources; and (3) threats that the project poses for habitat and/or water resources within conservation areas (e.g., introduction of exotic species, intrusion of residents in habitat areas) and measures to substantially reduce those threats. The project does not meet the requirements if it has negative effects on habitat for species identified in Option 2(a) of SLL Credit 7, Site Design for Habitat or Wetland and Water Body Conservation.

Option 1

On greenfield sites, limit all site disturbance to 40 feet beyond the building perimeter; 10 feet beyond surface walkways, patios, surface parking and utilities less than 12 inches in diameter; 15 feet beyond primary roadway curbs and main utility branch trenches; and 25 feet beyond constructed areas with permeable surfaces (such as pervious paving areas, stormwater detention facilities and playing fields) that require additional staging areas in order to limit compaction in the constructed area.

OR

Option 2

On previously developed or graded sites, restore or protect a minimum of 50% of the site area (excluding the building footprint) with native or adapted vegetation. Native/adapted plants are plants indigenous to a locality or cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds. Projects earning SS Credit 2 and using vegetated roof surfaces may apply the vegetated roof surface to this calculation (if the plants meet the definition of native/adapted), in which case the requirement is 20% of the total site area. This option is intended for urban sites with little or no building setback (i.e. zero lot line).

Greenfield sites are those that are not previously developed or graded and remain in a natural state. Previously developed sites are those that previously contained buildings, roadways, parking lots, or were graded or altered by direct human activities.

Over the performance period, have in place native or adapted vegetation covering a minimum of 25% of the site area, excluding the building footprint.

Improving and/or maintaining off-site areas with native or adapted plants can contribute toward earning SS Credit 5, provided the improvement and maintenance are documented in a contract with the owner of the off-site area. Every 2 square feet off-site can be counted as 1 square foot on-site.

Native plants are plants indigenous to a locality, and adapted plants are cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds.

Other ecologically appropriate features that contribute to this credit are natural site elements beyond vegetation that maintain or restore the ecological integrity of the site, including water bodies, exposed rock, unvegetated ground or other features that are part of the historic natural landscape within the region and provide habitat value.

For projects in urban sites with little or no building setback (i.e., zero lot line), SS Credit 5 may be earned using vegetated roof surfaces if the plants meet the definition of native or adapted and if the vegetated roof surface covers at least 5% of the LEED project site area.

Option 1

On greenfield sites, limit all site disturbance to 40 feet beyond the building perimeter; 10 feet beyond surface walkways, patios, surface parking and utilities less than 12 inches in diameter; 15 feet beyond primary roadway curbs and main utility branch trenches; and 25 feet beyond constructed areas with permeable surfaces (such as pervious paving areas, stormwater detention facilities and playing fields) that require additional staging areas in order to limit compaction in the constructed area.

OR

Option 2

On previously developed or graded sites, restore or protect a minimum of 50% of the site area (excluding the building footprint) with native or adapted vegetation. Native/adapted plants are plants indigenous to a locality or cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds. Projects earning SS Credit 2 and using vegetated roof surfaces may apply the vegetated roof surface to this calculation if the plants meet the definition of native/adapted.

Greenfield sites are those that are not previously developed or graded and remain in a natural state. Previously developed sites are those that previously contained buildings, roadways, parking lots, or were graded or altered by direct human activities.

Option 1

On greenfield sites, limit all site disturbance to 40 feet beyond the building perimeter; 10 feet beyond surface walkways, patios, surface parking and utilities less than 12 inches in diameter; 15 feet beyond primary roadway curbs and main utility branch trenches; and 25 feet beyond constructed areas with permeable surfaces (such as pervious paving areas, stormwater detention facilities and playing fields) that require additional staging areas in order to limit compaction in the constructed area.

OR

Option 2

On previously developed or graded sites, restore or protect a minimum of 50% of the site area (excluding the building footprint) with native or adapted vegetation. Native/adapted plants are plants indigenous to a locality or cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds. Projects earning SS Credit 2 and using vegetated roof surfaces may apply the vegetated roof surface to this calculation (if the plants meet the definition of native/adapted), in which case the requirement is 20% of the total site area. This option is intended for urban sites with little or no building setback (i.e. zero lot line).

Greenfield sites are those that are not previously developed or graded and remain in a natural state. Previously developed sites are those that previously contained buildings, roadways, parking lots, or were graded or altered by direct human activities.

On greenfield sites, limit site disturbance including earthwork and clearing of vegetation to 40 feet beyond the building perimeter, 5 feet beyond primary roadway curbs, walkways and main utility branch trenches, and 25 feet beyond constructed areas with permeable surfaces (such as pervious paving areas, stormwater detention facilities and playing fields) that require additional staging areas in order to limit compaction in the constructed area; OR, on previously developed sites, restore a minimum of 50% of the site area (excluding the building footprint) by replacing impervious surfaces with native or adapted vegetation.

On greenfield sites, limit site disturbance including earthwork and clearing of vegetation to 40 feet beyond the building perimeter, 5 feet beyond primary roadway curbs, walkways, and main utility branch trenches, and 25 feet beyond pervious paving areas that require additional staging areas in order to limit compaction in the paved area; OR, on previously developed sites, restore a minimum of 50% of the remaining open area by planting native or adapted vegetation.

Preserve and protect from all development and construction activity 40% of the greenfield area on the site (if such areas exist).

AND

Option 1. on-site restoration (2 points except healthcare, 1 point healthcare)

Using native or adapted vegetation, restore 30% (including the building footprint) of all portions of the site identified as previously disturbed. Projects that achieve a density of 1.5 floor-area ratio may include vegetated roof surfaces in this calculation if the plants are native or adapted, provide habitat, and promote biodiversity.

Restore all disturbed or compacted soils that will be revegetated within the project’s development footprint to meet the following requirements2 :

  • Soils (imported and in situ) must be reused for functions comparable to their original function.
  • Imported topsoils or soil blends designed to serve as topsoil may not include the following:
    • soils defined regionally by the Natural Resources Conservation Service web soil survey (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) as prime farmland, unique farmland, or farmland of statewide or local importance; or
    • soils from other greenfield sites, unless those soils are a byproduct of a construction process.
  • Restored soil must meet the criteria of reference soils in categories 1–3 and meet the criteria of either category 4 or 5:
  1. organic matter;
  2. compaction;
  3. infiltration rates;
  4. soil biological function; and
  5. soil chemical characteristics.

Project teams may exclude vegetated landscape areas that are constructed to accommodate rainwater infiltration from the vegetation and soils requirements, provided all such rainwater infiltration areas are treated consistently with SS Credit Rainwater Management.

Dedicated athletic fields that are solely for athletic uses are exempted from the soil restoration criteria. These areas may not count toward the minimum required area.

OR

Option 2. financial support (1 point)

Provide financial support equivalent to at least $0.40 per square foot (US$4 per square meter) for the total site area (including the building footprint).

Financial support must be provided to a nationally or locally recognized land trust or conservation organization within the same EPA Level III ecoregion or the project’s state (or within 100 miles of the project [160 kilometers] for projects outside the U.S.). For U.S. projects, the land trust must be accredited by the Land Trust Alliance.

2 Components adapted from the Sustainable Sites Initiative: Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks 2009, Credit 7.2: Restore Soils Disturbed During Construction
Option 1. On-Site Restoration (2 points)

Establishment

Have in place native or adapted vegetation on 20% of the total site area (including the building footprint), a minimum of 5,000 square feet (465 square meters), to provide habitat and promote biodiversity.

Performance

None.

OR

Option 2. Financial support (1 point)

Provide financial support equivalent to at least $0.05 per square foot (US$0.50 per square meter) for the total site area (including the building footprint).

Financial support must be provided annually to a nationally or locally recognized land trust or conservation organization within the same EPA Level III ecoregion or the project’s state (or within 100 miles [160 kilometers] for projects outside the U.S.). For U.S. projects, the land trust must be accredited by the Land Trust Alliance.

Provide the specified financial support annually.

Case 1. sites without significant habitat or wetlands and water bodies (1 point)

Locate the project on a site that does not have significant habitat, as defined in Case 2 of this credit, and is not within 100 feet (30 meters) of such habitat. Fulfill the requirements of Option 1 or 2(a) under SLL Prerequisite Wetland and Water Body Conservation.

Case 2. sites with habitat or wetlands or water bodies(1 point)

Meet the requirements of Option 1 or Option 2.

Option 1. sites with significant habitat

Work with both the state’s Natural Heritage Program and the state fish and wildlife agency (or local equivalent agency for projects outside the U.S.) to delineate identified significant habitat on the site. Do not disturb significant habitat or portions of the site within an appropriate buffer around the habitat. The geographic extent of the habitat and buffer must be identified by a qualified biologist, a nongovernmental conservation organization, or the appropriate state, regional, or local agency. Protect significant habitat and its identified buffers from development by donating or selling the land, or a conservation easement on the land, to an accredited land trust, conservation organization, or relevant government agency (a deed covenant is not sufficient to meet this requirement) for the purpose of long-term conservation.

Identify and commit to ongoing management activities, along with parties responsible for management and funding available, such that habitat is maintained in preproject condition or better for a minimum of three years after the project is built out. The requirement for identifying ongoing management activities may also be met by earning SLL Credit Long-Term Conservation Management of Wetlands and Water Bodies.

Significant habitat for this credit is as follows:

  • Endangered species acts.Habitat for species that are listed or are candidates for listing under state or national endangered species acts, habitat for species of special concern in the state, and habitat for species or ecological communities classified as GH, G1, G2, G3, S1, or S2 by NatureServe (local equivalent standards for threatened and endangered species may be used in countries outside the U.S. that do not have access to NatureServe data);

  • Locally or regionally significant habitat. Locally or regionally significant habitat of any size, or patches of predominantly native vegetation at least 150 acres (60 hectares) (even if part of the area lies outside the project boundary); and
  • Habitat flagged for conservation. Habitat flagged for conservation under a regional or state conservation or green infrastructure plan.
Option 2. sites with wetlands and water bodies (1 point)

Design the project to conserve 100% of all water bodies, wetlands, land within 100 feet (30 meters) of water bodies, and land within 50 feet (15 meters) of wetlands on the site. Using a qualified biologist, conduct an assessment, or compile existing assessments, showing the extent to which those water bodies or wetlands provide (1) water quality maintenance; (2) wildlife habitat; and (3) hydrologic function maintenance, including flood protection. Assign appropriate buffers, measuring not less than 100 feet (30 meters) for water bodies and 50 feet (15 meters) for wetlands, based on the functions provided, contiguous soils and slopes, and contiguous land uses. Do not disturb wetlands, water bodies, or their buffers, and protect them from development by donating or selling the land, or a conservation easement on the land, to an accredited land trust, conservation organization, or relevant government agency (a deed covenant is not sufficient to meet this requirement) for the purpose of long-term conservation.

Identify and commit to ongoing management activities, along with parties responsible for management and funding available, such that habitat is maintained in preproject condition or better for a minimum of three years after the project is built out. The requirement for identifying ongoing management activities may also be met by earning SLL Credit Long-Term Conservation Management of Wetlands and Water Bodies. The project does not meet the requirements if it degrades habitat for species identified in endangered species acts or habitat flagged for conservation in Option 1.

For All Projects

The following features are not considered wetlands, water bodies, or buffer land that must be protected:

  1. previously developed land;

  2. man-made water bodies (such as industrial mining pits, concrete-lined canals, or rainwater retention ponds) that lack natural edges and floors or native ecological communities in the water and along the edge;
  3. man-made linear wetlands that result from the interruption of natural drainages by existing rights-of-way; and
  4. wetlands that were created incidentally by human activity and have been rated “poor” for all measured wetland functions, as assessed by a qualified biologist using a method that is accepted by state or regional permitting agencies (or a local equivalent method for projects outside the U.S.).

Using only native plants, restore predevelopment native ecological communities, water bodies, or wetlands on the project site in an area equal to or greater than 10% of the development footprint.

Work with a qualified biologist to ensure that restored areas will have the native species assemblages, hydrology, and other habitat characteristics that likely occurred in predevelopment conditions. Protect such areas from development by donating or selling the land, or a conservation easement on the land, to an accredited land trust, conservation organization, or relevant government agency (a deed covenant is not sufficient to meet this requirement) for the purpose of long-term conservation.

Identify and commit to ongoing management activities, along with parties responsible for management and funding available, so that restored areas are maintained for a minimum of three years after the project is built out or the restoration is completed, whichever is later. The requirement for identifying ongoing management activities may also be met by earning SLL Credit Long-Term Conservation Management of Wetlands and Water Bodies.

The project does not meet the requirements if it has negative effects on habitat for species identified in endangered species acts or habitat flagged for conservation in Option 1 of SLL Credit Site Design for Habitat or Wetland and Water Body Conservation.

Create and commit to implementing a long-term (at least 10-year) management plan for existing or recently restored on-site native habitats, water bodies, or wetlands and their buffers, and create a guaranteed funding source for management.

Involve a qualified biologist or a professional from a natural resources agency or natural resources consulting firm in writing the management plan and conducting or evaluating the ongoing management.

The plan must include biological objectives consistent with habitat or water resource conservation, and it must identify the following:

  • procedures and personnel for maintaining the conservation areas;
  • estimated implementation costs and funding sources; and
  • any threats that the project poses for habitat or water resources within conservation areas (e.g., introduction of exotic species, intrusion of residents in habitat areas) and measures to substantially reduce those threats.

The project does not meet the requirements if it has negative effects on habitat for species identified in endangered species acts or habitat flagged for conservation in Option 1 of SLL Credit Site Design for Habitat or Wetland and Water Body Conservation.

Preserve and protect from all development and construction activity 40% of the greenfield area on the site (if such areas exist).

AND

Option 1. on-site restoration (2 points except healthcare, 1 point healthcare)

Using native or adapted vegetation, restore 30% (including the building footprint) of all portions of the site identified as previously disturbed. Projects that achieve a density of 1.5 floor-area ratio may include vegetated roof surfaces in this calculation if the plants are native or adapted, provide habitat, and promote biodiversity.

Restore all disturbed or compacted soils that will be revegetated within the project’s development footprint to meet the following requirements2 :

  • Soils (imported and in situ) must be reused for functions comparable to their original function.
  • Imported topsoils or soil blends designed to serve as topsoil may not include the following:
    • soils defined regionally by the Natural Resources Conservation Service web soil survey (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) as prime farmland, unique farmland, or farmland of statewide or local importance; or
    • soils from other greenfield sites, unless those soils are a byproduct of a construction process.
  • Restored soil must meet the criteria of reference soils in categories 1–3 and meet the criteria of either category 4 or 5:
  1. organic matter;
  2. compaction;
  3. infiltration rates;
  4. soil biological function; and
  5. soil chemical characteristics.

Project teams may exclude vegetated landscape areas that are constructed to accommodate rainwater infiltration from the vegetation and soils requirements, provided all such rainwater infiltration areas are treated consistently with SS Credit Rainwater Management.

OR

Option 2. financial support (1 point)

Provide financial support equivalent to at least $0.40 per square foot (US$4 per square meter) for the total site area (including the building footprint).

Financial support must be provided to a nationally or locally recognized land trust or conservation organization within the same EPA Level III ecoregion or the project’s state (or within 100 miles of the project [160 kilometers] for projects outside the U.S.). For U.S. projects, the land trust must be accredited by the Land Trust Alliance.

2 Components adapted from the Sustainable Sites Initiative: Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks 2009, Credit 7.2: Restore Soils Disturbed During Construction
CASE 1. Greenfield Sites4

Limit all site disturbance to the following parameters:

  • 40 feet (12 meters) beyond the building perimeter;
  • 10 feet (3 meters) beyond surface walkways, patios, surface parking and utilities less than 12 inches (30 centimeters) in diameter;
  • 15 feet (4.5 meters) beyond primary roadway curbs and main utility branch trenches;
  • 25 feet (8 meters) beyond constructed areas with permeable surfaces (such as pervious paving areas, stormwater detention facilities and playing fields) that require additional staging areas to limit compaction in the constructed area.
CASE 2. Previously Developed5 Areas or Graded Sites

Restore or protect a minimum of 50% of the site (excluding the building footprint) or 20% of the total site area (including building footprint), whichever is greater, with native or adapted vegetation6. Projects earning SS Credit 2: Development Density and Community Connectivity may include vegetated roof surface in this calculation if the plants are native or adapted, provide habitat, and promote biodiversity.

4 Greenfield sites are those that are not previously developed or graded and remain in a natural state. Rural landscapes are considered the same as greenfield sites. A rural landscape is a natural area modified by agro-forestry-pastoral activities, with environmental, aesthetic, cultural and historical values resulting from the interrelationship between its physical and biological aspects and traditional human activities.
5 Previously developed areas are those that previously contained buildings, roadways, parking lots or were graded or altered by direct human activities.
6 Native or adapted plants are plants indigenous to a locality or cultivars of native plants that are adapted to the local climate and are not considered invasive species or noxious weeds.

Preserve and protect from all development and construction activity 40% of the greenfield area on the site (if such areas exist).

AND

Option 1. on-site restoration (2 points except healthcare, 1 point healthcare)

Using native or adapted vegetation, restore 30% (including the building footprint) of all portions of the site identified as previously disturbed. Projects that achieve a density of 1.5 floor-area ratio may include vegetated roof surfaces in this calculation if the plants are native or adapted, provide habitat, and promote biodiversity.

Restore all disturbed or compacted soils that will be revegetated within the project’s development footprint to meet the following requirements2 :

  • Soils (imported and in situ) must be reused for functions comparable to their original function.
  • Imported topsoils or soil blends designed to serve as topsoil may not include the following:
    • soils defined regionally by the Natural Resources Conservation Service web soil survey (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.) as prime farmland, unique farmland, or farmland of statewide or local importance; or
    • soils from other greenfield sites, unless those soils are a byproduct of a construction process.
  • Restored soil must meet the criteria of reference soils in categories 1–3 and meet the criteria of either category 4 or 5:
  1. organic matter;
  2. compaction;
  3. infiltration rates;
  4. soil biological function; and
  5. soil chemical characteristics.

Project teams may exclude vegetated landscape areas that are constructed to accommodate rainwater infiltration from the vegetation and soils requirements, provided all such rainwater infiltration areas are treated consistently with SS Credit Rainwater Management.

OR

Option 2. financial support (1 point)

Provide financial support equivalent to at least $0.40 per square foot (US$4 per square meter) for the total site area (including the building footprint).

Financial support must be provided to a nationally or locally recognized land trust or conservation organization within the same EPA Level III ecoregion or the project’s state (or within 100 miles of the project [160 kilometers] for projects outside the U.S.). For U.S. projects, the land trust must be accredited by the Land Trust Alliance.

2 Components adapted from the Sustainable Sites Initiative: Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks 2009, Credit 7.2: Restore Soils Disturbed During Construction
Join LEEDuser

Ask questions, share tips, and get notified of new forum posts by joining LEEDuser, a tool developed by BuildingGreen and supported by USGBC!

  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on LinkedIn
  • Print to PDF
Sample forms
View sample forms