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Creating Healthy Healthcare Environments

GBCI: 0910000365

Patients generally tend to think of a health care facility as the first step on the road back to wellness. However, health care professionals, architects, and designers are becoming increasingly aware of a darker truth: the healthcare environment can create toxic threats to people that making them a short cut to more serious illness, permanent harm and even death. And the risk isn’t only limited to hospitals, but to other healthcare buildings where many people are brought together including all types of care facilities, acute care centers, specialty hospitals, clinics, ambulatory surgical centers and long term care facilities. The first step in creating truly healthy environments is to recognize the problem and then to find the most appropriate means of addressing it.
Eligible for 1 CE HOUR.
  • 1 CE

0

About

Patients generally tend to think of a health care facility as the first step on the road back to wellness. However, health care professionals, architects, and designers are becoming increasingly aware of a darker truth: the healthcare environment can create toxic threats to people that making them a short cut to more serious illness, permanent harm and even death. And the risk isn’t only limited to hospitals, but to other healthcare buildings where many people are brought together including all types of care facilities, acute care centers, specialty hospitals, clinics, ambulatory surgical centers and long term care facilities. The first step in creating truly healthy environments is to recognize the problem and then to find the most appropriate means of addressing it.

Objectives

  1. Identify and recognize the health issues related to the transfer of infectious bacteria in indoor healthcare environments.
  2. Investigate the options and alternatives to improvement in healthier environments that contribute to indoor environmental quality in LEED and in general.
  3. Compare and contrast the differences between chemical approaches and natural approaches to addressing infectious bacteria in LEED certified buildings and others healthcare facilities.
  4. Specify natural antimicrobial flooring and wall material consistent with LEED v4 for Healthcare.
Intermediate

Created by

McGraw Hill Construction
Washington, DC
United States

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