Why Trees are Stronger than Wood | U.S. Green Building Council
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Why Trees are Stronger than Wood

GBCI: 0920003324

Building with trees that are too small to mill (small diameter timber) is a sustainable, cost-effective alternative to steel, concrete and heavy timber products.
Eligible for 1 CE HOUR.
  • 1 CE

LEED version: v4, v2009

0

About

Building with trees that are too small to mill (small diameter timber) is a sustainable, cost-effective alternative to steel, concrete and heavy timber products. Historic images and modern examples of round timber and mass timber (cross-lam) construction demonstrate the past and newly emerging durability of building with wood. This presentation draws on material science to demonstrate the competitiveness of round timber in load capacity, bending strength, fire rating, and life-cycle performance and shares information on the declining health of forests and lessons learned from 20 years of managing a 20-acre Forest Service Council sustainable forest and learning lab. Incorporating small-diameter timber (a material that is currently considered sustainably managed forest waste) into commercial and residential construction will have a restorative impact on local communities' economy and ecology.

Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to name 3 types of historic structures built using small diameter timber
  2. Participants will be able to name a benefit to the forest ecosystems or regional economies of building with small diameter timbers or other mass timber technologies (CLT)
  3. Participants will be able to name a performance benefit of using small diameter timber structural system in bending strength, fire rating, fire failure mode, and life cycle performance
  4. Participants will be able to quote a new learning of building with small diameter timber found in destructive testing at the USDA Forest Products Lab
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Intermediate

Created by

WholeTrees Architecture and Structures
Madison, WI
United States

Leaders

  • 1
    Amelia Baxter made 1 contribution in the last 6 months

Amelia Baxter

CEO and co-founder WholeTrees Architecture and Structures