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Architect, Dahan Properties
I am looking for LEED ND v4 material to prepare for my exam. Can anyone give me some link or provide some information from where I can get the resources to read? Also, LEED v4 version is valid till which year? If I am planning to give my exam before June, then LEED v4 is good?
Membership, Credentialing, and Education Specialist, U.S. Green Building Council
Hello Ankita, Thank you for your question. If you take your exam by June 30, 2017 it will still be under the LEED v4. We do not have any plans in the foreseeable future to update to a new version and once we do update to a different version there will be a public announcement. Below are some resources to help you prepare for the LEED AP ND exam: LEED ND exam prep • Reference Guide: http://www.usgbc.org/resources/leed-reference-guide-neighborhood-develop... • Free Candidate Handbook, including Sample Questions (available in multiple languages): http://www.usgbc.org/resources/grid/credentialing I would encourage you to review the LEED AP ND reference in the candidate handbook on page 20. • Introduction to LEED v4 (created by the USGBC, free with subscription):http://www.usgbc.org/node/2772813
LEED Specialist, U.S. Green Building Council
Zack, there are three potential stages in NDv4: Letter of Support (called Stage 1 in NDv3), ND: Plan (Stage 2 in NDv3), and ND: Built Project (Stage 3 in NDv3). A project can enter the process at any of these stages, depending on the extent of planning, design, or construction that has occurred. If a project team enters ND at NS: Plan, for instance, the review of the LEED application would be the initial stage review. This review would consist of two steps: preliminary, resulting in comments back to the project team, and then final. Then, if the project team decides to seek full certification, they could register in ND: Built Project. The review of this application, still consisting of two steps, would be a subsequent stage review. The lower review fee would apply to this review.
LEED consultant, Mirae environmental Plan Co.Ltd.
How does the subsequent review process fit in to the new LEED ND v4 review process? I can only guess that if a project completes a LEED ND: Plan certification, when they return to obtain ND: Built certification, they can skip the initial review and go straight into the subsequent review, is this correct? Thanks!
For LEEDv4 Homes, is there a way to determine if my project is within the boundary of a develop certified under LEED for Neighborhood Development? What is meant by Certified Plan or Certified Project under the v4 rating system?
Green Building Specialist, U.S. Green Building Council
Thank you for your inquiry about LEED ND. The efficient way to find the LEED project boundary is to reach out to the developer for the project site plan. The LEED for Neighborhood Development rating system comprises two adaptations, LEED ND: Plan and LEED ND: Built Project. A project must use the LEED ND Plan rating system if it is in a planning stage or has constructed less than 75% of its total building floor area. If a project is at full build-out, it must use the LEED ND rating system. The LEED ND: Plan and LEED ND: Built Project rating systems have identical credit requirements but differing documentation requirements and awards.
Senior Sustainability Consultant, Taitem Engineering, PC
My first question is, if Stage 3 is the only stage in the process that will garner an actual certification level for the development, then what are the benefits of also registering under Stage 2? I noticed that the certification fee to register an initial stage is $18,000 and then another $10,000 for another stage review. Why do you need more than one stage review? What happens at each of these stages? I am only able to find information about how the development would be eligible to enter at each one of these stages, but I think am very confused on why you would need to register and go through review process for more than on stage? Why not just register under stage 3? And lastly, do all attempted credits need to be completed before submitting for review? In other words, unlike other ratings systems that separate credits by "design" and "construction" and you have the option to do a split review, do you need to complete all credits before submitting for any review? Thank you in advance! Courtney
LEED Specialist, U.S. Green Building Council
Hi Courtney, The number of review stages a project needs or wants depends on a variety of factors. The optional SSL review is available for teams that are not certain that certification is possible. Stage 1 Conditional Approval that results in a 'Letter of Support" is relevant for projects still seeking project approval. Stage 2 results in pre-certification that can be useful for sales purposes in the same way that Core & Shell buildings use pre-certification. You are correct that if none of these are necessary for your project, it is appropriate to go directly to Stage 3. You are also correct that review is not split between design and construction; that is part of the function of the various stages. This is well explained on pages xx and xxi of the 2009 LEED Reference Guide for Green Neighborhood Development, and similarly in the LEED Reference Guide for Neighborhood Development LEED v4.
principal, CEO, urban design innovations
Hi USGBC -- what is the different content between the LEED v4 and 2009 LEED ND reference guides?
LEED Specialist, U.S. Green Building Council
Hi Bruce, in the v4 reference guide, each credit has a section called 'Changes from v2009'. I recommend you read those sections. We do not have a comparative list.
Manager, U.S. Green Building Council
Hello, Yes, it is possible to certify an industrial park facility using LEED. In some circumstances, LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED ND) is an applicable rating system, but industrial park facilities often face challenges because of ND’s density minimums, connectivity considerations, walkable streets design elements and a number of other requirements. If ND isn’t applicable, using the Campus certification approach can often help streamline the certification of multiple buildings within the industrial park. The Campus approach can help certify a number of similar buildings in the park or to take advantage of sustainable strategies that are used across the entire industrial park facility. Don’t forget, the Campus approach can also be used to streamline documentation of multiple buildings within a LEED ND project. We find that familiarizing yourself with the LEED ND rating system or working with professionals that have had experience with the rating system is often very helpful. Though there are some similarities, LEED ND is different from the single building rating systems in a number of ways. The ND educational resources available online are a good place to get a better understanding the rating system. Finally, taking advantage of the Introductory Call and the Prerequisite Review available as a part of the LEED ND certification process for ND, to help ensure that the project starts off on solid footing.
Hello, is it possible to Leed certify an industrial park facility? It is still a project development, however our team and investors would like to explore the opportunity. Does Neiborhood development applies? What kind of knowledge, training and certification will I need to lead this project? Please advise, Iñaki Urien
Director of LEED Support, U.S. Green Building Council
Hello - Looks like Jason's response didn't sync up perfectly with your question, so just wanted to make sure you saw his reply: "Hello, Yes, it is possible to certify an industrial park facility using LEED. In some circumstances, LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED ND) is an applicable rating system, but industrial park facilities often face challenges because of ND’s density minimums, connectivity considerations, walkable streets design elements and a number of other requirements. If ND isn’t applicable, using the Campus certification approach can often help streamline the certification of multiple buildings within the industrial park. The Campus approach can help certify a number of similar buildings in the park or to take advantage of sustainable strategies that are used across the entire industrial park facility. Don’t forget, the Campus approach can also be used to streamline documentation of multiple buildings within a LEED ND project. We find that familiarizing yourself with the LEED ND rating system or working with professionals that have had experience with the rating system is often very helpful. Though there are some similarities, LEED ND is different from the single building rating systems in a number of ways. The ND educational resources available online are a good place to get a better understanding the rating system. Finally, taking advantage of the Introductory Call and the Prerequisite Review available as a part of the LEED ND certification process for ND, to help ensure that the project starts off on solid footing." Also - if they haven't already - one of my colleagues plans to reach out to you offline; please be on the look out for correspondence from either Stefanie or Kat. Thanks - MRS
Senior Sustainability Planner, City of West Hollywood
We welcome all customers to contact us at neighborhoods@usbgc.org and/or the GBCI Contact Us Page at: http://www.gbci.org/org-nav/contact/Contact-Us/Project-Certification-Que... to learn more about LEED ND or to answer any questions you may have regarding the Rating System.

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