Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Prerequisite/Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "2359" "2008-10-24" "Commercial Interiors" "EAc1.2: Optimize Energy Performance, Lighting Controls" "The project has an exterior canopy that wraps the building and projects 5\'-0"" from the exterior glazing. The daylight responsive controls for our project will be installed within 10\' of the window glazing. In order to achieve this credit, do we need to install the controls 15\' from the edge of the exterior canopy or 15\' from the window glazing?" "The project team is requesting clarification on the location of daylight responsive lighting controls to meet Credit EAc1.2 requirements. The credit requires that the controls be located within 15\' of the window glazing in all regularly occupied spaces. The exterior canopy provides shading for the glazing but is not considered as part of this dimension. Installing daylight control sensors within 10\' of the window glazing will meet this portion of credit requirements. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5091" "2007-11-27" "Commercial Interiors" "EAc1.2: Optimize Energy Performance, Lighting Controls" "This CIR is written to address the application of daylight responsive controls and the appropriate ways in which areas of a building can be excluded from this Credit. There are two rooms within the project that would be considered regularly occupied spaces, however the use of daylight responsive controls would not be appropriate. Both of these spaces do have exterior walls with windows and shades. The first space is a conference room, which will be used for a variety of meetings and presentations. The room will be equipped with AV equipment and therefore will require adjusting light levels accordingly. Therefore, the proposed design includes a complex dimming system with multiple schemes to allow for the necessary AV lighting level adjustment. The lights for the room will not operate when the room is vacant. One of the base lighting schemes will be set as the default scheme to operate once occupancy is sensed. We feel that the inclusion of daylight responsive controls would interfere with the occupant-chosen dimming schemes and is thus not appropriate in this room. The second space is a conference space/cafeteria. This space also has windows with operable shades and a line voltage dimmer. This is a large room that will be used for larger company meetings/presentations and for employee lunch and break purposes. The presence of daylight responsive controls would again interfere with the ability of the occupant to dim the space to their lighting needs. In summary: 1) We are requesting clarification on the definition of ""regularly occupied spaces"" within LEED-CI. 2) The intent of this CIR is to see areas such as the conference/cafeteria space described above would be an area acceptable to exclude from having daylight responsive controls. This is based on the ongoing potential for the daylight controls to interfere with the room\'s function. The lack of feasibility in conjunction with an occupant controlled dimmable system." "It is not acceptable to exclude the cafeteria and conference room spaces from the requirements of EAc1.2. The USGBC defines regularly occupied spaces as ""areas where workers are seated or standing as they work inside a building."" Both conference rooms and cafeterias fall under this description. In the ""Design Approach for Daylight-Responsive Controls"" section of the LEED-CI v2.0 Reference Guide description of EAc1.2, it is made clear that lighting control systems may have to deal with the combined logic of daylighting, occupancy sensors, and timed shut-off situations. Contemporary lighting systems are capable of handling both automated functions to reduce energy usage, and manual over-ride functions to allow for specific lighting level control, when needed. Applicable Internationally. " "5933" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5933" "2007-11-27" "Commercial Interiors" "EAc1.2: Optimize Energy Performance, Lighting Controls" "This CIR is written to address the application of daylight responsive controls and the appropriate ways in which areas of a building can be excluded from this Credit. There are two rooms within the project that would be considered regularly occupied spaces, however the use of daylight responsive controls would not be appropriate. Both of these spaces do have exterior walls with windows and shades. The first space is a conference room, which will be used for a variety of meetings and presentations. The room will be equipped with AV equipment and therefore will require adjusting light levels accordingly. Therefore, the proposed design includes a complex dimming system with multiple schemes to allow for the necessary AV lighting level adjustment. The lights for the room will not operate when the room is vacant. One of the base lighting schemes will be set as the default scheme to operate once occupancy is sensed. We feel that the inclusion of daylight responsive controls would interfere with the occupant-chosen dimming schemes and is thus not appropriate in this room. The second space is a conference space/cafeteria. This space also has windows with operable shades and a line voltage dimmer. This is a large room that will be used for larger company meetings/presentations and for employee lunch and break purposes. The presence of daylight responsive controls would again interfere with the ability of the occupant to dim the space to their lighting needs. In summary: 1) We are requesting clarification on the definition of ""regularly occupied spaces"" within LEED-CI. 2) The intent of this CIR is to see areas such as the conference/cafeteria space described above would be an area acceptable to exclude from having daylight responsive controls. This is based on the ongoing potential for the daylight controls to interfere with the room\'s function. The lack of feasibility in conjunction with an occupant controlled dimmable system. " "It is not acceptable to exclude the cafeteria and conference room spaces from the requirements of EAc1.2. The USGBC defines regularly occupied spaces as ""areas where workers are seated or standing as they work inside a building."" Both conference rooms and cafeterias fall under this description. In the ""Design Approach for Daylight-Responsive Controls"" section of the LEED-CI v2.0 Reference Guide description of EAc1.2, it is made clear that lighting control systems may have to deal with the combined logic of daylighting, occupancy sensors, and timed shut-off situations. Contemporary lighting systems are capable of handling both automated functions to reduce energy usage, and manual over-ride functions to allow for specific lighting level control, when needed. " "5091" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5060" "2007-07-09" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "ASHRAE 90.1 sets specific requirements for the building envelope, including meeting all requirements of Section 5.4. Air Leakage, Section 5.4.3, requires sealing, caulking, gaskets and weather stripping of the building envelop to minimize air leakage. For the Barkesdale Dormitory, additional methods were used to minimize air infiltration. Additional barriers, taping, and low leakage panels per ASTM E283-84 (0.06 cfm per square foot of fixed wall at 63.3 mph wind and 1.92 iwg.) were used. Additionally, the building was pressurized to prevent infiltration. A baseline building model is neutral with average construction. With the value added benefit of additional barriers, taping and low leakage panels and pressurization, the Barkesdale Dormitory can be considered a ""tight-pressurized construction"". These differences could effect the energy calculations. Is this a logical conclusion?" "This CIR seeks to use reduced infiltration rates from a superior building envelope as a variable in the energy cost budget calculation for optimizing energy efficiency. The ASHRAE modeling protocol does not allow the infiltration rate to be changed between the budget and the design case. The CIR ruling of 3/11/2003 for EAc1.2 provides some guidelines on how a case might be made for advanced air sealing. The methodology proposed for this project does not address all the issues raised in that ruling and would be insufficient to grant an exception to the modeling protocol. Applicable Internationally. " "3300" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5261" "2007-04-25" "New Construction" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "The adoption of Appendix G under LEED 2.2 raises all sorts of interesting questions with respect to the energy modeling protocol. Please clarify for us and the world of LEED users out there the following: 1. Appendix G Addendum a Would USGBC for LEED 2.2 adopt the published Addendum a to 90.1-2004 Appendix G which changes a number of areas? 2. Building Orientation May we choose to not implement in our baseline model ASHRAE 90.1-2004 Appendix G Table G3.1 5. (a) orientation rotation which requires rotating the model to 4 cardinal directions, and averaging the results. For our project, orientation with the long axis of the building East-West was not optional. 3. Baseline Fenestration Area and Location Would the USGBC eliminate the provision under ASHRAE 90.1-2004 Appendix G Table G3.1 Baseline 5.(c) that requires dividing out the entire design window area, up to the 40% maximum window to wall ratio, and defining it as horizontal bands with average window to wall area on all facings and floors? This change is also proposed under Addendum a to 90.-2004. The addendum references the section numbering from an earlier version of the Standard prior to the creation of Table G3.1 in the current version of the Standard. 4. Residential Designed Lighting Baseline Will USGBC for LEED 2.2 adopt the same rules adopted under LEED 2.1 CIR rulings that established a residential lighting baseline, for designed fixed lighting? ASHRAE 90.1-2004 still treats residential living area lighting as exempt (9.1.1 Exception b), and Appendix G does not define a baseline for this lighting. The rulings defined a process of mapping from the designed lighting to baseline lighting with conventional incandescent lighting, with a maximum baseline lighting power density of 2.0 W/s.f. The rulings also established a 750 hour full load equivalent operating schedule to be the same in design and baseline. 5. Residential Receptacle Lighting Will USGBC for LEED 2.2 accept 90.1 Addendum a) change to table G3.1 Design 6 (d) so that receptable lighting energy usage is not subtracted out from the design and baseline models. This is an inconsistency the addendum corrects, and is the only case where non-regulated energy is not counted under the new standard. 6. Lighting Controls Will USGBC for LEED 2.2. allow Exceptional Calculations regarding energy savings for occupancy sensor and time-of-day controls that exceed ASHRAE 90.1 code requirements that are greater than the Appendix G Table G3.2. For example, LEED 2.1 rulings appeared to allow greater than 10% allowed by Appendix G for occupancy sensors controlling normally 24 hour interior stair lighting in a multi-family high-rise that would be occupied only a small fraction of the time. 7. Exterior Lighting Will USGBC for LEED 2.2 allow credit for exterior lighting that is more efficient than the new mandatory provision for exterior lighting in 90.1-2004 section 9.4. Appendix G does not address how exterior lighting should be modeled for the baseline, and therefore the default is that it should be modeled the same as the design and no credit for savings could be taken. 8. Residential Appliances and Exhaust Fans Will USGBC for LEED 2.2. allow for Energy Star rated appliances and exhaust fans an Exceptional Calculation approach (similar to previous LEED 2.1 rulings for an appliance ID credit) to calculate energy cost savings for EAc1? Exceptional calculation would be based on Energy Star data to define design and baseline energy usage? 9. DHW Usage Reduction Will USGBC for LEED 2.2. allow the approach to claim domestic hot water energy cost reduction based on low flow fixtures, relative to EPACT standard allowed fixture flows from earlier LEED 2.1 rulings. Another approach would be to adopt 90.1-2004 addendum a) revision to Table 3.1 Baseline 11. labeled as a revision to G4.3 under the older numbering convention. 10. Heat Recovery from Condenser Loop Will USGBC for LEED 2.2 allow the baseline adjustment for heat recovery from condenser loops to DHW as required in section 6.5.6.2 to be done with assistance of spreadsheet analysis outside of the model, or will the provision at Appendix G Table 3.1 Baseline 11 (f) exception that requires the proposed design to actually include the heat recovery equipment in the real building, if the modeling software cannot model it. The design feature cannot be modeled under DOE-2.2 and its interface eQuest, one of the most widely used and otherwise versatile programs. This provision, if enforced, requires a significant expense for the project that may not be cost effective compared to alternatives. This would be a penalty on the subset of projects that fall under the rules at 6.5.6.2. Normally, the design does not have to meet the prescriptive requirements of ASHRAE, but is allowed to make trade-offs to achieve overall energy cost savings. 11. Solar Hot Water-Clarify Eligibility for EAc1&2 Will USGBC state that solar hot water generation, that does not generate any electricity is eligible for credit under EAc1 and EAc2? Requirements language paragraph 1 for EAc2 does not state if energy generated from a renewable source is electric or thermal, although other parts of the chapter allow for solar hot water, but the second paragraph refers to a method to just estimate electricity generation. Just want to be sure there is no question that solar hot water generation is eligible for both EAc1&2." "[REVISED 10/30/07 to allow energy savings for exterior lighting.] 1. No. Since multiple projects are already in process and the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide specifically mentions that ASHRAE 90.1-2004 is applicable without addenda; any addenda not included in the completed standard will not be accepted at this time. 2. No. The Appendix G method of distributing the glazing equally on all orientations normalizes this issue. The question raised by Appendix G is - Is your building designed to respond to the specific solar orientation? 3. No. See points 1 and 2 above. 4. Yes. The calculation methodology should be considered equivalent for LEED-NC v2.2. 5. The LEED modeling protocol addresses this issue by setting the process load as 25% of total energy by default, unless it is a process dominated building. For a typical residential building, process loads will never be above 25% and therefore should not be an issue. 6. Exceptional Calculation for any measure that is not accounted for in the modeling protocol is accepted on a case-by-case basis. 7. Yes, project teams can take credit for efficient exterior lighting within ASHRAE 90.1 Appendix G. Credit may only be taken for the tradable surfaces listed in ASHRAE 90.1-2004 Table 9.4.5. All other exterior lighting must be modeled identically in the Baseline and Proposed case. The Baseline case exterior lighting power allowance should be calculated using the methodology outline in Section 9.4.5. 8. Yes. Page 184 of the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide describes Exceptional Calculations for residential appliances. 9. No. Credit for saving water is already granted in the Water Efficiency section of the LEED Rating System. The Domestic Hot Water (DHW) loop will be sized for design flows and the PRM does not allow credit for changing loop flows for DHW. 10. No. The requirements for the loop sizing have been set in Appendix G and to maintain integrity of the modeling protocol, such exceptions cannot be taken. 11. Yes. On-site energy generated can be taken credit for using the Exceptional Calculations under EAc1, Optimize Energy Performance, and as percent of total energy for EAc2, On-Site Renewable Energy. Note: ASHRAE Addenda have been approved for use in LEED projects, as stated on our website: http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=2664 Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X"