Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "Reference Guide Correction" "100000956" "2011-05-09" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare" "None" "None" "Green Building Design and Construction, 2009 edition" "n/a" "n/a" "Note the following addenda under \'Calculating Materials Costs to Achieve MR Credits\' on page 337:\n\nAdd the following after ""...Furniture and Furnishings as long as this is done consistently across all MR credits."", ""Exclude artwork, interior plants, and musical instruments.""" "Rating System Correction, Reference Guide Correction" "100000998" "2011-08-01" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction" "None" "None" "Green Building Design and Construction, 2009 edition $ Green Building Design and Construction, 2009 Edition, updated June 2010 " "BD+C RG: 387, NC RS: 54, Schools RS: 56,
Retail-NC RG supp: 103, Retail-NC RS: 50" "Requirements" "In the second line of the paragraph, replace ""plants"" with ""agricultural products""" "LEED Interpretation" "10057" "2011-05-09" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Is mesquite wood from the southwest is considered a rapidly renewable material? The tree can grow to maturity in 6 years." "Any source material which is typically regenerated within a ten-year cycle may be considered rapidly renewable. The submittal must include documentation from the wood supplier which describes their harvesting practices, and typical rate of harvest and regrowth." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10152" "2012-04-01" "New Construction" "When a LEED NC project attempts LEED CI Indoor Environmental Quality credit 4.5: Low Emitting Materials - Systems Furniture and Seating as an Innovation in Design strategy, are they required to include the furniture costs in Materials and Resources credits 3 thru 7?" "No, LEED NC projects are not required to include furniture in their calculations for MR credit 3-7 if using low emitting furniture for an ID strategy. LEED Interpretation #3901 states that although furniture does not have a dedicated credit in the New Construction rating system ""since furniture can have an effect on indoor environmental quality, projects that include furniture in the scope of work are eligible to apply for an innovation credit based on LEED for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI) IEQ credit 4.5, Low-Emitting Materials - Furniture."" For project teams pursuing this credit as an ID strategy, the cost of the furniture is not required to me included in the total materials cost in Materials and Resources credits 3,4,5,6, or 7. The intention of this ID strategy is to easily reference a set of rigorous Indoor Environmental Quality requirements relating to furniture. While it is not required to include furniture in Materials and Resources credits project teams are encouraged to look for sustainable criteria synergies when purchasing furniture." "3901" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10153" "2012-04-01" "New Construction" "When a LEED NC project attempts LEED CI Indoor Environmental Quality credit 4.5: Low Emitting Materials - Systems Furniture and Seating as an Innovation in Design strategy, are they required to include the furniture costs in Materials and Resources credits 3 thru 7?" "No, LEED NC projects are not required to include furniture in their calculations for MR credit 3-7 if using low emitting furniture for an ID strategy. LEED Interpretation #3901 states that although furniture does not have a dedicated credit in the New Construction rating system ""since furniture can have an effect on indoor environmental quality, projects that include furniture in the scope of work are eligible to apply for an innovation credit based on LEED for Commercial Interiors (LEED-CI) IEQ credit 4.5, Low-Emitting Materials - Furniture."" For project teams pursuing this credit as an ID strategy, the cost of the furniture is not required to me included in the total materials cost in Materials and Resources credits 3,4,5,6, or 7. The intention of this ID strategy is to easily reference a set of rigorous Indoor Environmental Quality requirements relating to furniture. While it is not required to include furniture in Materials and Resources credits project teams are encouraged to look for sustainable criteria synergies when purchasing furniture." "3901" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2535" "2009-04-22" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "We are seeking clarification on MR 7 as related to the use of FSC bamboo plywood and FSC bamboo flooring products. Similar to hardwoods, bamboo forests are most sustainable when only 20 percent of the bamboo is harvested in any given year, leaving the forest canopy uncompromised and the ecosystem intact. Poorly managed bamboo forests have detrimental effects on the local economy and the environment. With demand increasing for this natural resource, FSC certification of bamboo sources ensures proper harvesting to protect the local economy and the environment. Smith & Fong\'s bamboo resource was certified by the European FSC-certifier Institut f" "The project team is seeking clarification as to whether or not bamboo can be considered a compliant material under the guidelines set forth in MRc7. The bamboo products in question have been harvested and sourced by companies that possess the necessary and current certifications from the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). This proposal is consistent with the credit intent to, ""Encourage environmentally responsible forest management"". In addition, bamboo is often used in many of the same applications as wood products, and is considered by the FSC to be a forest product despite its technical classification as a grass. Therefore, bamboo may be included in the calculations for both MRc6 and MRc7. If bamboo is added to the MRc7 calculations, all bamboo on the project (FSC or otherwise) must be accounted for in the value for all new wood-based components for the project. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2549" "2009-04-17" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Schools - New Construction" "Our project is a hotel in Manhattan. The hotel is committed to using rapidly renewable materials in the form of wool carpeting and PLA fabrics. PLA (polylactic acid) fabrics are biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources such as corn starch and sugarcane. The hotel is also planning to use leather on the headboards in all guestrooms and would like to determine if leather products should be included in the calculations. The LEED-NCv2.2 reference guide defines rapidly renewable materials as an \'agricultural product, both fiber and animal, that takes 10 years or less to grow or raise, and to harvest in an ongoing fashion\'. Can the leather be considered a rapidly renewable material? How does the USGBC determine which animal agricultural products are included? Are there established standards or restrictions that must be met by the industry (i.e. humane treatment, use of by-products of other industries, etc.)?" "The project team is seeking clarification on the use of leather as a compliant material under the guidelines set forth in MR credit 6 regarding rapidly renewable materials. On page 411 of the LEED NC v2.2 reference guide ""rapidly renewable materials"" are defined as material considered to be an agricultural product, both fiber and animal, that takes 10 years or less to grow or raise, and to harvest in an ongoing and sustainable fashion. Although leather is an animal product, it is not deemed to be rapidly renewable as the leather material or hide may not be collected until after the death of the animal. An example an acceptable renewable animal source would be sheep\'s fleece. The fleece can be sheered from the animal without presenting harm to it nor does it prevent the animal from regenerating the material. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10294" "2013-10-01" "New Construction, Retail - New Construction" "For retail projects, what items are considered casework and built-in millwork that must be included in the base building documentation (in MRc3-7 and IEQc4.4), rather than furniture?" "There are typically two types of casework found in projects. The first is casework that is custom built – often from shop drawings – and specified in CSI Division 6. Included are custom millwork cabinets, countertops, custom desks, shelving, etc. These are base building (or real property) elements considered permanently installed. They may be assembled on or off-site.\n\n The second type of casework is manufactured furniture. It is usually ordered from a catalog and found in the project specifications in CSI Division 12. These items are considered furniture and included in ID&C projects and only included in BD&C projects when they are consistently used in calculations. They are not base building items. Included in Division 12 are individual and group seating, open-plan and private-office workstations, desks, tables, storage units, credenzas, bookshelves, filing cabinets, and wall-mounted visual-display products (e.g., marker boards and tack boards). Items such as electronic displays and miscellaneous items, such as easels, mobile carts, and desk accessories are not included in the credits.\n\n Sometimes furniture is semi-permanently attached using mechanical fastening systems due to operational use. These are not permanently installed and therefore are not base building elements. An example in a retail or hospitality setting would be a display that is bolted to the floor or moveable / semi-permanently-attached manufactured shelving. Consider these guidance definitions:\n\n Permanently installed building product – in addition to those items that serve structural purposes, permanently installed building products are items that are affixed to the building without intention to be removed, either because the item is integral to the walls, ceiling, or floor, or removing the item will cause damage to building (i.e. real property vs. personal property). Examples include items found in CSI MasterFormat Division 6- Millwork as well as wall, floor, or ceiling finished such as ceramic tiles, or drywall, window and door frames (unless part of removable partitions, see definition for furniture), baseboards, siding, roofing, masonry, and permanently installed built in casework, such as shelving or countertops. Exceptions may exist for these examples.\n\n Furniture - Items that are non-permanently affixed are considered furniture. This includes items that do not serve structural purposes and may be removed without damage to real property. Examples include desks, chairs, filing systems, retail displays, or removable partitions (including drywall and glass system partitions including doors) that can be readily removed and reused without damage to other partitions, ceilings, floors, or structure. Typically these items fall under CSI MasterFormat 2010 Division 12-Furniture, however some items may be specified in other divisions and there are exceptions to these examples.\n\n Real Property – consisting of immovable portions of building. Distinguished from personal property. Items installed by tenants or for temporary use are considered personal property and not real property. " "None" "None" "X"