Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "Reference Guide Correction" "100000541" "2009-10-27" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "None" "None" "Homes, 2008 edition" "172" "Column 2, 1st paragraph" """...performance levels of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency\'s ENERGY STAR for Homes."" change to ""...performance levels specified in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency\'s ENERGY STAR for Homes program, Version 2006.""" "Reference Guide Correction" "100000542" "2009-10-27" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "None" "None" "Homes, 2008 edition" "173" "Column 1, 1st paragraph, " """The mandatory minimum level... performance requirements of the ENERGY STAR for Homes program."" change to ""The mandatory minimum level... performance requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes, Version 2006.""" "Reference Guide Correction" "100000544" "2009-10-27" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "None" "None" "Homes, 2008 edition" "173" "Column 2, 3rd paragraph" """If a heat pump is installed with a programmable thermostat, the thermostat must be equipped with adaptive recovery. This technology enables the heating equipment to gradually adjust when the thermostat setting changes, preventing overdependence on the less efficient backup heating system."" change to: ""All homes must meet the following requirements. These requirements are in the prescriptive path, and they must also be met by homes following the performance pathway:\nHVAC equipment must be designed and sized using ACCA Manual J, the ASHRAE 2001 Handbook of Fundamentals, or an equivalent computation procedure. See EQ 6.1 for more details. \nIf a heat pump is installed with a programmable thermostat, the thermostat must be equipped with adaptive recovery. This technology enables the heating equipment to gradually adjust when the thermostat setting changes, preventing overdependence on the less efficient backup heating system.""\n" "Reference Guide Correction" "100000545" "2009-10-27" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "None" "None" "Homes, 2008 edition" "175" "Column 1, first bullet on the page" """Conduct the necessary modeling... or have an independent energy rater conduct the necessary modeling."" change to ""Conduct the necessary modeling... or have a qualified energy rater conduct the necessary modeling.""" "Reference Guide Correction" "100000546" "2009-10-27" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "None" "None" "Homes, 2008 edition" "175" "Exemplary Performance" """No additional points are available for exemplary performance."" change to: ""The energy models that are used for the performance pathway (EA 1) do not recognize the benefits of water-efficient clothes washers. A project using the performance pathway should be awarded exemplary performance points for meeting the requirements of EA 9.1(d) and 9.2 for clothes washers, to be counted under Innovation & Design 3. Projects can submit an Innovation & Design Request for commissioning of building energy systems. These will be considered on a case-by-case basis.""" "Reference Guide Correction" "100000543" "2009-10-27" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "None" "None" "Homes, 2008 edition" "173" "Column 1, 4th paragraph " """Work with an energy rater to determine the most appropriate measures..."" change to: ""Work with a qualified energy rater to determine the most appropriate measures...""" "LEED Interpretation" "1513" "2006-10-02" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Does HERS certified software have to be used for EA 1?" "Yes. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1514" "2007-12-18" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Does an accredited HERS Provider and Rater have to be used for EA 1?" "Yes, unless or until USGBC approves alternative qualified energy raters. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1515" "2008-01-28" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Does an accredited HERS Rater have to be used for the EA prescriptive pathway?" "Yes, unless or until USGBC approves alternative qualified energy raters. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1516" "2007-03-23" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "If a project earns a different number of points using the performance path than the prescriptive path, which should be used?" "Projects may calculate points using either pathway and should be awarded points using the most beneficial approach. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1961" "2007-12-20" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Is exemplary performance credit available to projects using the performance path for meeting the requirements for clothes washers under EA 9.1 and 9.2? The HERS Index does not address clothes washers." "**Update 4/2/2014. Yes - for projects using the performance path, 1 exemplary performance point is available for meeting the requirements of EA 9.2. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1962" "2007-12-20" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Is exemplary performance credit available to projects using the performance path for meeting the requirements of EA 8.3? The HERS Index doesn\'t distinguish between fixtures and lamps." "No exemplary performance credit is available for meeting EA 8.3; lighting upgrades are counted in the energy model in EA 1. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2062" "2008-04-14" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "ID Request for the use of a radiant barrier around all exterior walls and roof." "No ID point is available for the use of a reflective radiant barrier. The value of the radiant barrier in the roof may be captured in the energy model in EA 1. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2133" "2008-05-01" "Homes, Mid-rise" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "In the energy modeling rules under California\'s Title-24, if an envelope leakage test is not performed, the energy model must assume a default envelope leakage of 4.9 SLA. Is this acceptable for LEED for Homes?" "Yes, if an envelope leakage test is not performed, the default envelope leakage dictated by Title-24 must be used." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2213" "2008-06-09" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "EPA has created special regional Builder Option Packages (e.g., Hawaii, Pacific Northwest). Can projects in these regions satisfy EA 1 by meeting the requirements in the appropriate regional BOP?" "Meeting the requirements of a regional EPA-approved Builder Option Package is an acceptable alternative to EA 1.1, but no points may be awarded in EA 1.2. The only other credits that may be earned in the EA category are EA 7.1, EA 7.2, and EA 11.2. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2233" "2008-10-23" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Can projects be given credit for installing shading devices? If so, how should this be reflected in the energy model?" "No credit should be granted for internal, operable shading devices. As per the RESNET guidelines, the energy model already assumes some blinds on all windows. Credit can be granted for exterior or integrated shading devices if they are permanent and inoperable or automated. This can be done by modeling the window with a lower SHGC that reflects the impact of the shading coefficient on the glazing part of the window. Any calculations like this must be reviewed by the energy modeler. Applicable Internationally. \n" "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2272" "2008-07-21" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "EPA created a Builder Option Package for the Pacific Northwest that is very similar to the LEED for Homes prescriptive path. If a project meets the regional BOP, can the prescriptive pathway be used in LEED for Homes, even if the project but does not meet all of the prerequisites in the prescriptive pathway?" "No - in order to use the prescriptive pathway in LEED for Homes, every prerequisite in EA 2 through 11 must be met. See EA 01-14 for the policy on certifying homes that only meet a regional BOP." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2273" "2008-07-21" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "ID Request for Fundamental Commissioning of the Building Energy Systems in multi-family buildings." "Project-specific IDRs must be submitted, detailing the items that will be included in the commissioning, and explaining how and why these are an improvement above the usual duties of the Green Rater." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2315" "2008-09-17" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Is exemplary performance credit available for the use of motion detectors or photovoltaic cells on exterior lights for projects using the performance path?" "No - exterior lighting should be included in the HERS model, and reflected in the HERS Index. Please review the RESNET Standards, chapter 3. Daylight sensors can be counted as ""qualifying light fixtures"". It\'s less clear how photovoltaic cells should be counted, but they can at least be counted as ""qualifying lighting fixtures"". If you have other questions about modeling exterior lighting with PV, please submit the question to the RESNET technical committee. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2380" "2009-02-08" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "ID Request for the use of lighting controls, such as dimmers, timers, sensors, to reduce the lighting energy consumption." "No ID point is available for the use of lighting controls - including timers, sensors, dimmers, or other controllers. These technologies are good, but do not save enough total energy to earn an ID point. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2437" "2008-12-08" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Is exemplary performance credit available for homes in California that are able to demonstrate performance of 65% better than Title-24?" "Yes - exemplary performance credit is available using the following approach: 1 point for exceeding Title-24 by 65%; 2 points for 70%; 3 points for 75%; and 4 points for 80%." "California T24-2013" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2523" "2009-03-18" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Is a thermal bypass inspection required for homes with SIP or ICF construction?" "Yes - even though many of the requirements of the TBC will automatically be met for homes with SIP wall and roofs, the TBC form still needs to be completed." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2601" "2009-08-25" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Energy Star in California requires that the Title-24 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) be met. However, CEC guidance document indicates that ICF, SIP, and spray foam insulation cannot meet the QII. Does this mean that homes with alternative insulation are not allowed to participate in LEED for Homes?" "Homes in California must meet the QII to earn LEED for Homes certification, but homes with alternative insulation still can pursue certification. According to CEC guidance, homes with ICFs, SIPs, or spray foam insulation cannot get credit for QII within the energy model. However, for LEED for Homes and Energy Star the QII is still required. Any QII requirements that are not applicable can be ignored, or listed as ""NA"". Projects with SIPs or ICFs must also complete the Energy Star Structural Insulated Panel Visual Inspection Form, available from EPA. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2603" "2009-08-25" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "If the Energy Star for Homes requirements change, do homes have to meet the updated requirements to satisfy EA 1? For example, the requirement in Florida recently changed from a HERS Index of 85 to a HERS Index of 77." "No - the prerequisite EA 1.1 in LEED for Homes Version 2008 is to meet the performance requirements of ENERGY STAR for Homes 2006. For example, in Florida the requirement for EA 1.1 will remain a HERS Index of 85. Homes in Florida that achieve a HERS Index lower than 85 are eligible to earn points under EA 1.2, regardless of whether they are participating in the new ENERGY STAR for Homes in Florida program." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2662" "2009-10-07" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "In the energy modeling rules under California\'s Title-24, for gut-rehab projects, the reference building is modeled using the envelope characteristics of the existing building. Is this approach acceptable for LEED for Homes?" "No - all single-family homes and low-rise buildings in LEED for Homes should be modeled as ""new"" for the purposes of modeling. This is true even for gut-rehab projects." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2671" "2009-10-16" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Energy Star for Homes performance includes a requirement that duct leakage cannot exceed 6 CFM to the outdoors. If a multi-family project has ducts running through interstitial spaces (e.g. between floors), is there any technique for isolating leakage to the outdoors? How should this be handled if the total leakage exceeds 6 CFM, but it\'s impossible to isolate the leakage to the outdoors?" "According to EPA, in a multi-family building, if ductwork runs into interstitial spaces, the total leakage should be limited to 6 CFM. The energy rater has some discretion. If the leakage only slightly exceeds 6 CFM but it\'s located within interstitial spaces that are air-sealed from the outdoors, the energy rater may choose to pass the building." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2685" "2009-08-11" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Can projects get credit for wind power in the energy model? Should points be calculated using the method in EA 10?" "Wind power should be incorporated into the energy model and credited within the HERS Index, according to the RESNET Standards. The estimated output from the wind energy system must be calculated by a professional, preferably using modeling that takes into consideration wind conditions for the specific project location. \n\nBased on input from RESNET and AEC (developer of REMRate), there are two suggested options for how to represent wind power in an energy model:\n1) jury-rig the PV inputs so they reflect the amount of power generated by the wind system.\n2) calculate the HERS Index, then adjust the outputs outside of the modeling software and calculate an adjusted Index taking into consideration the contribution from wind. In this case, a project-specific CIR must be submitted showing the original HERS Index and the calculation that was done to create the new adjusted index. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2699" "2009-11-02" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "The thermal bypass inspection checklist requires slab-edge insulation for homes built in climate zone 4 or higher. Does this apply to homes with basements and crawlspaces, or only homes built with slab-on-grade?" "According to EPA, the slab-edge insulation requirement in the TBC only applies to slab-on-grade floors with a floor surface less than 12"" below grade. Basements are exempt under this definition, except for walkout basements. Vented crawlspaces don\'t require insulation because the slab is not part of the thermal envelope. Unvented crawls may need insulation, depending on the depth of the slab. Up to 25% of the slab edge may be uninsulated. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2700" "2009-11-02" "Homes, Mid-rise" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Can 4- or 5-story multi-family buildings use the low-rise Rating System and the HERS Index for EA 1?" "For 3-4 story projects that meet all of the following criteria, the decision of whether to use LEED for Homes or LEED for Homes Mid-Rise Pilot is at the discretion of the project team, Green Rater and Provider: (1) the project is 4 stories or fewer; (2) the project has individual heating, cooling and water heating for each unit; and (3) the building includes no more than 20% residential-associated spaces (i.e. common spaces that serve the occupants). \n\nProviders are advised to disallow these projects from using the low-rise Rating System if they believe that the project has certain qualities (e.g. large common space loads, high ceilings and large stack effect) that are poorly reflected in the HERS Index and associated modeling tools. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2715" "2009-11-23" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "In California, how should existing homes / gut rehab projects be modeled? Should the baseline (reference) building be the prior home, or a new home built to code?" "For energy modeling, the reference home should be a new home built to code regardless of whether the LEED home is a new home or a gut-rehab project." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2717" "2009-11-30" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "What is required for homes to ""meet the performance requirements of Energy Star for Homes""?" "The performance requirements of Energy Star for Homes 2006 are published on the EPA website and include: 1) HERS Index of 80 or lower in climate zones 6-8 or HERS Index of 85 or lower in climate zones 1-5; 2) completed Thermal Bypass Inspection Checklist, including slab-edge insulation in climate zones 4+; 3) duct leakage of less than 6 CFM to outdoors per 100 sq. ft.; 4) at least one Energy Star qualified product (heating or cooling equipment; windows; 5 or more labeled light fixtures, appliances, or ventilation fans); 5) indoor and outdoor coils must be matched, in accordance with AHRI standards; 6) adaptive recovery for any programmable thermostats installed in homes with a heat pump; and 7) maximum oversizing limit for air conditioners and heat pumps is 15% (with the exception of heat pumps in Climate Zones 5-8, where maximum oversizing is 25%). The full details are available at http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/bldrs_lenders_raters/downloads/PerfPathTRK.pdf ." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2718" "2009-11-30" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Can attached townhomes in California use the Title-24 energy model to demonstrate performance in EA 1? Attached townhomes in California are treated as multi-family buildings by CA Title-24, and they are modeled together. " "It is acceptable for attached townhomes in California to use the code compliance energy model to demonstrate average performance for LEED certification on the following two conditions: 1) all of the units must be designed to perform similarly. Specifically, the variation in energy performance among all units should not exceed 5%. This determination can be made based on the expertise and judgment of the energy modeler, but this approach should not be used if some units are constructed with additional energy upgrades (e.g. PV, solar DHW, improved HVAC) unless those upgrades are left out of the model. 2) the building must be modeled using results from performance tests for each individual unit, or the worst-case results from among the performance tests of all of the units. \n\nIf a project does not meet this criteria, the units must be modeled separately for LEED certification." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2726" "2009-12-02" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Energy Star for Homes (EA 1) does not allow projects to meet the minimum HERS Index with renewable energy systems. Does this include solar DHW systems? For example, if a project just barely meets the minimum HERS Index requirement with a solar DHW system, is this acceptable for LEED for Homes." "The Energy Star for Homes Guideline states that ""On-site power generation may not be used to decrease the HERS Index to qualify for Energy Star."" Since solar DHW systems are not a form of power generation, projects may meet the minimum HERS Index requirement with solar DHW systems." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2728" "2009-12-14" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "How are projects with room air conditioners (e.g., window units, through-wall units) handled in LEED for Homes?" "Projects that wish to install room air conditioners must meet all of the following: \n • They should follow the performance approach in EA. This is because room air conditioner units generally do not meet the efficiency requirements under prerequisite EA 6.1, \n • The blower-door tests must be done after installation of the room air conditioners, AND \n • Projects may not procure or offer options for air conditioner units that fail the prerequisites even if they are not installed. In other words, projects cannot get around requirements by not installing the air conditioner units until after certification. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2729" "2009-12-15" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "California Title-24 treats low-rise multi-family buildings differently depending on the amount of space outside the unit. For buildings where the non-residential and residential-associated (e.g. corridors, foyers) spaces is less than 10%, the entire building is modeled as ""residential"" under Title-24. For buildings where the non-residential and residential-associated space exceeds 10%, two different models are created: one for the ""residential"" spaces and one for the ""non-residential"" spaces; these two different models include different assumptions, baselines, etc. Should the ""Percentage better than Title-24"" value that is calculated for EA 1 include only the data from the residential model, or the combination of data from both the residential and non-residential model?\n\n" "For the purposes of EA 1, multi-family projects in California may choose whether to include the modeling output associated with the non-residential and residential-associated spaces. This provides maximum flexibility, and it\'s consistent with the RESNET approach, in which multi-family buildings are allowed to be modeled either as individual units OR as an entire building. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2731" "2009-12-15" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Is a separate HERS Rating required for each unit in a set of attached homes? Or can a worst-case HERS Index be used - based on worst-case exposed wall area and worst-case WFA ratio? Do performance tests need to be done for each unit? " "It is acceptable to create a HERS Index for the worst-case home among multiple attached single-family homes. The ENERGY STAR for Homes guidelines must be followed, including the worst-case among the units for exposed wall area, window-to-floor area ratio. \n\nPerformance tests (e.g. blower door test, duct blaster test) must be completed on every home (except where sampling is applicable), and the HERS Index must include the worst-case performance test results from among all homes included in the batch." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2732" "2009-12-15" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "Is exemplary performance credit available if a project achieves a negative HERS Index?" "Yes, exemplary performance credit should be awarded for projects that are able to verify a negative HERS Index. One ID point should be awarded for each 3 HERS Index pts below zero. For example, a HERS Index of -6 should be awarded 2 ID points. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2763" "2010-01-19" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "How should woodstoves be modeled in the HERS Index, if they are used to provide auxiliary heating? The Northeast HERS Alliance guidance suggests that woodstoves be included in the model if it is the only heating system or if the primary heating system is designed not to meet the entire load. " "The Northeast HERS Alliance guidance should be followed for the purposes of modeling in EA 1: woodstoves or other non-conventional heating appliances should be included in the model if it is the only heating system or if the primary heating system is designed not to meet the entire load. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2777" "2010-03-14" "Homes" "EAc10: Renewable Electric Energy Generation" "If a project installs a PV system on a home that is designed to serve both the building loads but also exterior loads - including lighting, pools, fountains, detached garages, etc. - how should the output from this PV system be counted? Should the PV output used in the EA 10 calculation be reduced? Or should the exterior loads be included in the annual reference electric load?" "The scope of EA 10 is only meant to include the primary loads of the home, such as those captured in a whole-building energy model. If a PV system is installed and designed to serve some loads that are not captured in the model, the PV output should be discounted for the purposes of EA 10. Specifically, the project team (including the PV designer) should estimate the electricity consumption associated with both the in-home and relevant exterior loads that are served by the PV system. The PV output used in EA 10 should be weighted based on the estimated percentage of the total electricity consumption in the home. For example, if the estimated electricity consumption in the home is 10,000 kWh/year and the estimated electricity consumption of exterior loads (e.g. pool, lighting, detached garage) is 5,000 kWh/year, then only two-thirds of the PV output should be counted in the EA 10 calculation. \n\nIf the PV system is wired in such a way that it\'s easy to disentangle the PV serving the home from the PV serving exterior loads, then this weighting approach is not needed; in this case, no credit should be awarded for the PV capacity that only serves exterior loads. \n\n **Updated January 1, 2014\n For single-family homes using the performance path (EA 1), if the PV is serving an ancillary load that is not already included in the energy model, this ancillary load must be added to the total loads in both the reference and rated home.\n\n For single-family homes using the prescriptive path (EA 10), any ancillary loads served by the PV system must be added to the annual reference electric load before doing the calculation to determining percent savings." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2778" "2010-03-14" "Homes" "EAc10: Renewable Electric Energy Generation" "If a project installs a PV system on a multi-family building that is designed to serve both the in-unit loads but also common space loads and exterior loads - including lighting, pools, fountains, detached garages, etc. - how should the output from this PV system be counted? Should the PV output used in the EA 10 calculation be reduced? Or should the common space loads and exterior loads be included in the annual reference electric load?" "For low-rise multi-family buildings, the scope of EA 10 is only meant to include the primary loads of the units. If a PV system is installed and designed to serve common spaces or exterior loads, the PV output should be discounted for the purposes of EA 10. Specifically, the project team (including the PV designer) should estimate the electricity consumption associated with both the in-unit and relevant common or exterior loads that are served by the PV system. The PV output used in EA 10 should be weighted based on the estimated percentage of the total electricity consumption in the home. \n\nFor example, if the estimated in-unit electricity consumption is 80,000 kWh/year and the estimated electricity consumption of exterior loads (e.g. pool, lighting, detached garage) is 20,000 kWh/year, then only 80% of the PV output should be counted in the EA 10 calculation. \n\n **Updated January 1, 2014\n For multi-family buildings using the performance path (EA 1) and modeling the building unit-by-unit, use a pro-rated approach to assign PV to each individual unit. Use the following approach: (a) calculate the kWh output for the entire PV system; (b) calculate the kWh per square foot of conditioned spaces based on the total building square footage; (c) estimate the PV output for each unit by multiplying the unit floor area by the kWh per square foot calculated in part b.\n\n For multi-family buildings using the performance path (EA 1) and modeling the whole building, if the PV is serving an ancillary load that is not already included in the energy model, this ancillary load must be added to the total loads in both the rated and reference building.\n\n For multi-family buildings using the prescriptive path (EA 10) and a whole-building approach, any ancillary loads served by the PV system must be added to the annual reference electric load before doing the calculation to determining percent savings.\n\n For multi-family buildings using the prescriptive path (EA 10) and a unit-by-unit approach, use the following approach: (a) calculate the kWh output for the entire PV system; (b) calculate the kWh per square foot of conditioned spaces based on the total building square footage; (c) estimate the PV output for each unit by multiplying the unit floor area by the kWh per square foot calculated in part b; and (d) use this pro-rated output in the calculation in EA 10." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2780" "2010-03-28" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "For projects in Hawaii, does the TBC need to be passed if the Energy Star for Homes Builder Option Package is used?" "If a project in Hawaii plans only to meet the prerequisite in EA 1.1, there are no additional requirements beyond the ENERGY STAR BOP and a thermal bypass inspection is not required. See EA 01-14 for further details. \n\nIf a project in Hawaii intends to pursue points in EA 1.2 and conduct energy modeling, the following policy applies: the TBC is required and must be passed by a qualified energy rater if the home has space conditioning (cooling/heating). If a project has no space conditioning, it does not have to pass the thermal bypass inspection, but the project must be modeled using the blower door default value and Grade 3 insulation. A thermal bypass inspection must still be conducted, but a failure will not prevent certification." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2793" "2010-04-19" "Homes, Mid-rise" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "In California, is there any requirement for the qualifications of the energy modelers?" "All energy modeling for LEED for Homes projects in California must be performed by a CEA or CEPE, and must have specifically taken and passed the test on residential standards." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5250" "2007-01-01" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "What is the Builder Option Package?" "The ""Builder Option Package"" (BOP) is the prescriptive approach to meeting the ENERGY STAR Homes qualification level. See www.energystar.gov/homes for more info." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5300" "2008-02-20" "Homes, Mid-rise" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "If a project team has general questions related to ENERGY STAR for Homes - for example, the thermal bypass checklist, performance requirements, etc. - can it get direct answers from EPA?" "ENERGY STAR has a hotline that will answer questions. E-mail hotline@energystar.gov with your specific question." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5302" "2008-03-18" "Homes, Mid-rise" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "ID Request for the use of a ground-source heat pump that provides both space heating and domestic water heating." "This ID request is denied. This technology should be reflected in the energy model in EA 1. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5349" "2009-03-26" "Homes" "EAc1: Optimize Energy Performance" "In California, metal framed homes are treated differently from wood framed homes. Are metal-framed homes allowed to pursue certification under LEED for Homes? Are there any additional stipulations?" "Metal framed homes in California may pursue LEED for Homes certification. Since Title-24 doesn\'t allow metal-framed homes to earn credit for the insulation inspection, no credit should be granted in the model used for LEED for Homes. However, an insulation inspection must be conducted - following either the ENERGY STAR thermal bypass inspection checklist or the California QII procedures. All other CA Energy Star requirements must be met, including especially the proper sizing of the HVAC equipment. Blower door testing must be conducted for metal-framed homes; the default leakage rate cannot be assumed. The test results must meet or exceed what is input into the model. If the home underperforms, either the model must be changed and re-run or the builder must remedy the problem and have the home re-tested." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10352" "2014-01-01" "Homes, Mid-rise" "EAc1 - Optimize energy performance" "In January 2010 the California Title-24 changed. For EA 1.2, should the performance level (e.g. 15% better than Title-24) refer to the new 2008 Standards that took effect in January, or the old 2005 Standards that were in place when LEED for Homes was balloted?" "As of January, 2011, the Rating System for California has been changed so the requirement for EA 1 is to exceed Title-24 2008 by 15% or more. However, projects are allowed to submit for certification using whatever version of Title-24 was used for the permitting process." "California T24-2013, California T24-2013 for Midrise" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10354" "2014-01-01" "Homes" "EAc1 - Optimize energy performance" "For mixed-use low-rise projects, should the energy model include commercial spaces? If so, how?" "The energy model used for EA 1 in low-rise building should only include the residential and residential-associated spaces, as per the RESNET protocols. For any non-residential spaces, the project team must develop detailed green tenant fit-out guidelines (see relevant guidance from LEED for Homes on tenant fit-out guidelines)." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10353" "2014-01-01" "Homes" "EAc1 - Optimize energy performance" "Can projects use the NFRC's Component Modeling Approach methodology for verifying performance specifications for windows under EA4 and EA 1? CMAST is a software tool created by NFRC for custom commercial windows." "Fenestration used to satisfy LEED for Homes prerequisites and credits must meet the following condition: 1) the installed fenestration components correspond to approved components listed within the NFRC Component Modeling Approach Software Tool (“CMAST”) library; 2) the CMAST project developed for each home has been generated by an ACE (Approved Calculation Entity) Organization; and 3) the fenestration products for the home are included in a Project Label Certificate that has been approved and certified by an Independent Certification and Inspection Agency (“IA”) licensed by NFRC. \n\n Custom fenestration modeled using CMAST or LBL's WINDOW and THERM software - but not certified by NFRC - may be used for no more than 10% of the total window area in the home. This window area still must meet the performance requirements in LEED for Homes." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10347" "2014-01-01" "Homes" "EAc10 - Renewable energy" "If PV is installed on the LEED building, but the energy is not used to reduce occupant energy bills - directly or indirectly (i.e. through HOA or condo fees) - can the project still get credit for the PV?" "To be credited in EA 10 or EA 1, any renewable energy system must serve the occupants - either directly or indirectly. If a project leases space on the building for a renewable energy system but the system is not used to offset energy use from the building, it may not be used to earn credit in EA 10 or EA 1." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10382" "2014-04-02" "Homes, Mid-rise" "EA 1: Optimize Energy Performance " "Can projects in California get credit for installing HRVs or ERVs, since these are not included in the Title 24 energy model?" "Projects in California may get .5 ID points for installing HRVs or ERVs, since these are not included in the Title 24 energy model. For multifamily projects, an HRV or ERV must be installed to provide all of each unit’s fresh air requirements." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10381" "2014-04-02" "Homes" "EA 1: Optimize Energy Performance " "Can Passive House projects use the PHIUS + approach to kitchen exhaust, as opposed to meeting ASHRAE 62.2 requirements of 5 ACH of the kitchen volume for continuous ventilation?" "Projects that are PHIUS+ certified are permitted to use a continuous kitchen exhaust rate of 25 CFM per 2009 IRC table M1507.3, powered by an energy or heat recovery ventilator, but only if there are no combustion appliances in the kitchen (such as gas ovens or ranges). \n\n Additional note: This ruling aligns with EPA ENERGY STAR for Homes and DOE Challenge Home ruling 00343, while adding in the requirement that no appliances can be combustion fueled. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10383" "2014-04-02" "Mid-rise" "EA 1: Optimize Energy Performance " "Can projects with demonstrated tight predrywall duct leakage test results be except from having to test again when construction is complete?" "Projects that achieve 3 cfm/100sf of total duct leakage at predrywall are waived from meeting final testing, granted that they follow EPA ENERGY STAR for Homes Policy Record ruling 00340. This ruling requires the entire HVAC system to be in place (less installed registers and the surface the boots are sealed to such as drywall), and requires that at final inspection that all duct boots are visually verified to be sealed to the finished surface." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10380" "2014-04-02" "Homes" "EA 1: Optimize Energy Performance " "Does LEED for Homes require an official HERS Rating (i.e., fee paid to RESNET)? " "Official HERS ratings are required. A copy of the official HERS report should be submitted to the Green Rater. " "None" "None" "X"