Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "Reference Guide Correction" "100000567" "2009-10-27" "Homes" "None" "None" "Homes, 2008 edition" "223" "Exemplary Performance" """No additional points are available for exemplary performance."" change to ""No additional points are available for exemplary performance. Projects that exceed the credit requirements are encouraged to use the performance pathway in EA 1.2.""" "LEED Interpretation" "10178" "2012-04-01" "Homes" "Can fuel cells that run on hydrogen be used to earn credt in EA 10 for renewable energy system? " "Fuel cells are not necessarily treated as renewable energy technologies. Projects interested in pursuing this must provide more information, including: 1) the specific fuel cell being used; and 2) the original source of fuel that will be used to create the hydrogen for the fuel cell." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2364" "2008-11-03" "Homes" "Is exemplary performance credit available for projects in California that install a renewable energy system that produces more than 30% of the annual reference electric load?" "Yes, projects in California may be awarded exemplary performance credit for installing a renewable energy system that offset more than 30% of the annual reference electric load. These points are only available if the project also earns at least 12 points in EA 1.2. Points should be awarded in the following way: 1 point for offsetting 36%; 2 points for offsetting 42%; 3 points for offsetting 48%; and 4 points for offsetting 54%. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2660" "2009-10-06" "Homes" "The Mid-rise Guidelines for California indicate that projects should earn 1 LEED point for every 5% of the annual reference electrical load met by a renewable energy system. However, the low-rise Rating System awards 1 LEED point per 3% offset. Which is correct?" "Mid-rise projects in California should be awarded 1 LEED point for every 3% of the annual reference electrical load met by a renewable energy system." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2694" "2009-10-31" "Homes" "In a multi-family building, if PV is installed but it only serves some units - not all - can any credit be awarded? Can the PV output be averaged across all units?" "No - PV may only be credited if it serves all of the units / occupants. Except where stated explicitly in the Rating System or CIRs, a credit or prerequisite is not met unless 100% of the units satisfy the requirements. It is unacceptable to have significantly disparate benefits for different units. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2702" "2009-11-02" "Homes" "Is exemplary performance credit available for EA 10?" "No exemplary performance credit is available for EA 10. Projects that exceed the maximum allowed in EA 10 are advised to use energy modeling in EA 1 to fully value the added PV. The only exception is for projects in California. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2777" "2010-03-14" "Homes" "If a project installs a PV system on a home that is designed to serve both the building loads but also exterior loads - including lighting, pools, fountains, detached garages, etc. - how should the output from this PV system be counted? Should the PV output used in the EA 10 calculation be reduced? Or should the exterior loads be included in the annual reference electric load?" "The scope of EA 10 is only meant to include the primary loads of the home, such as those captured in a whole-building energy model. If a PV system is installed and designed to serve some loads that are not captured in the model, the PV output should be discounted for the purposes of EA 10. Specifically, the project team (including the PV designer) should estimate the electricity consumption associated with both the in-home and relevant exterior loads that are served by the PV system. The PV output used in EA 10 should be weighted based on the estimated percentage of the total electricity consumption in the home. For example, if the estimated electricity consumption in the home is 10,000 kWh/year and the estimated electricity consumption of exterior loads (e.g. pool, lighting, detached garage) is 5,000 kWh/year, then only two-thirds of the PV output should be counted in the EA 10 calculation. \n\nIf the PV system is wired in such a way that it\'s easy to disentangle the PV serving the home from the PV serving exterior loads, then this weighting approach is not needed; in this case, no credit should be awarded for the PV capacity that only serves exterior loads. \n\n **Updated January 1, 2014\n For single-family homes using the performance path (EA 1), if the PV is serving an ancillary load that is not already included in the energy model, this ancillary load must be added to the total loads in both the reference and rated home.\n\n For single-family homes using the prescriptive path (EA 10), any ancillary loads served by the PV system must be added to the annual reference electric load before doing the calculation to determining percent savings." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2778" "2010-03-14" "Homes" "If a project installs a PV system on a multi-family building that is designed to serve both the in-unit loads but also common space loads and exterior loads - including lighting, pools, fountains, detached garages, etc. - how should the output from this PV system be counted? Should the PV output used in the EA 10 calculation be reduced? Or should the common space loads and exterior loads be included in the annual reference electric load?" "For low-rise multi-family buildings, the scope of EA 10 is only meant to include the primary loads of the units. If a PV system is installed and designed to serve common spaces or exterior loads, the PV output should be discounted for the purposes of EA 10. Specifically, the project team (including the PV designer) should estimate the electricity consumption associated with both the in-unit and relevant common or exterior loads that are served by the PV system. The PV output used in EA 10 should be weighted based on the estimated percentage of the total electricity consumption in the home. \n\nFor example, if the estimated in-unit electricity consumption is 80,000 kWh/year and the estimated electricity consumption of exterior loads (e.g. pool, lighting, detached garage) is 20,000 kWh/year, then only 80% of the PV output should be counted in the EA 10 calculation. \n\n **Updated January 1, 2014\n For multi-family buildings using the performance path (EA 1) and modeling the building unit-by-unit, use a pro-rated approach to assign PV to each individual unit. Use the following approach: (a) calculate the kWh output for the entire PV system; (b) calculate the kWh per square foot of conditioned spaces based on the total building square footage; (c) estimate the PV output for each unit by multiplying the unit floor area by the kWh per square foot calculated in part b.\n\n For multi-family buildings using the performance path (EA 1) and modeling the whole building, if the PV is serving an ancillary load that is not already included in the energy model, this ancillary load must be added to the total loads in both the rated and reference building.\n\n For multi-family buildings using the prescriptive path (EA 10) and a whole-building approach, any ancillary loads served by the PV system must be added to the annual reference electric load before doing the calculation to determining percent savings.\n\n For multi-family buildings using the prescriptive path (EA 10) and a unit-by-unit approach, use the following approach: (a) calculate the kWh output for the entire PV system; (b) calculate the kWh per square foot of conditioned spaces based on the total building square footage; (c) estimate the PV output for each unit by multiplying the unit floor area by the kWh per square foot calculated in part b; and (d) use this pro-rated output in the calculation in EA 10." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5269" "2007-06-21" "Homes" "How is the ""annual reference electric load"" supposed to be determined?" "The annual reference electric load must be calculated using an energy model to determine the annual electric load for the HERS Reference home. See other rulings for what should and should not be included in the estimate." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10345" "2014-01-01" "Homes" "The Mid-rise Guidelines for California indicate that the calculation should compare estimated renewable electricity production to TOTAL energy loads for the Standard Design building. This differs from EA 10 for low-rise buildings, where the estimated renewable electricity production is only compared to the electricity loads (not total energy loads) for the Standard Design building. Which is correct for mid-rise buildings in California?" "As of January 1st 2011, it is appropriate to use total energy loads when conducting the calculation for EA 10 for both low-rise and mid-rise projects in California." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10344" "2014-01-01" "Homes" "When calculating the annual reference energy load for EA 10, should this include exterior lighting? The CEC recently approved a method for calculating energy use associated with a building's exterior lighting." "Any ancillary loads served by the renewable energy system must be included in the reference energy load, including exterior lighting." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10346" "2014-01-01" "Homes" "For multi-family projects in California, how should PV be handled in EA 10 if it is not serving in-unit spaces but instead offsetting common space or exterior loads (e.g. lighting, pools, fountains, detached garages)? " "For multi-family projects in California, any ancillary loads served by the PV system must be added to the annual reference energy load before doing the calculation to determining percent savings." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10347" "2014-01-01" "Homes" "If PV is installed on the LEED building, but the energy is not used to reduce occupant energy bills - directly or indirectly (i.e. through HOA or condo fees) - can the project still get credit for the PV?" "To be credited in EA 10 or EA 1, any renewable energy system must serve the occupants - either directly or indirectly. If a project leases space on the building for a renewable energy system but the system is not used to offset energy use from the building, it may not be used to earn credit in EA 10 or EA 1." "None" "None" "X"