Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "Rating System Correction" "100000835" "2011-02-02" "Healthcare" "IEQc4: Low-Emitting Materials" "None" "None" "" "76" "GROUP 2" "In the fourth line of the second paragraph, remove ""/M-500""" "Rating System Correction" "100000836" "2011-02-02" "Healthcare" "IEQc4: Low-Emitting Materials" "None" "None" "" "76" "GROUP 2" "In the fourth line of the paragraph, remove ""/M-500""" "LEED Interpretation" "10223" "2012-07-01" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Retail - New Construction, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Healthcare" "IEQc4.2: Low-Emitting Materials-Paints and Coatings" "This project is a healthcare facility consisting of 3 renovated floors, floors 9, 10 and 13. As part of patient care and to meet patient safety requirements on the 13th psychiatric floor, 21 square feet of Tabrasa Ultra Dry Erase Coating has been applied to each of 27 patient rooms. This dry erase coating does not clearly fall within any of the architectural coating categories defined in LEED for Commercial Interiors Version 2.0 IEQ Credit 4.2 Low Emitting Materials Paints and Coatings under South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 1113. The product does comply under LEED for Schools 2009 IEQ Credit 4.2 Low Emitting Materials Paints and Coatings requirements as defined by the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers. The project team is requesting that this product be acceptable under the LEED for Commercial Interiors Version 2.0 IEQ 4.2 Low Emitting Materials Paints and Coatings." "The project team is asking how to classify dry-erase coatings which are not specifically addressed in South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 1113. The product regulatory category and credit reporting classification should be determined and declared by the manufacturer. If the regulatory category and classification cannot be determined or the product is a specialty product not otherwise listed in the Table of Standards or defined in the associated Definitions per section (b) , it would fall under the default VOC limit of 250 g/L as per section (c)(1) of South Coast Air Quality Management District Rule 1113 (dated July 09 2004). Alternatively, if the classification cannot be determined or the product is a specialty product, the product\'s compliance with the LEED for Schools 2009 IEQ Credit 4.2 Low Emitting Materials Paints and Coatings requirements for the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers is an acceptable alternative to the SCAQMD Rule 1113 VOC content requirements for healthcare projects. CDPH testing is also acceptable for office projects provided the office testing scenario is used. Applicable Internationally.\n\n***Updated 01/01/2013 to modify applicability for LEED-NC v2.2 from not applicable to applicable." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10250" "2012-10-01" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Retail - New Construction, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Healthcare" "IEQc4.4: Low-Emitting Materials-Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products/Laminate Adhesives" "To comply with CARB, some composite wood manufacturers are switching from urea formaldehyde resins to:a. Melamine urea formaldehyde with urea formaldehyde added as a ""scavenger"" to bond with residual un-bonded formaldehyde molecules attempting to reduce formaldehyde off-gassing. b. Melamine formaldehyde with urea added as a scavenger. These resins are being marketed as ""melamine formaldehyde"" and compliant with LEED\'s no added urea formaldehyde IEQ4.4 credit requirements. While resulting composite wood products made with these resin technologies may be CARB compliant, the question arises as to the use of these resins being compliant with LEED IEQc4.4. Phenol formaldehyde and MDI have long been proven to be the best resin options to urea formaldehyde to prevent formaldehyde off-gassing, so utilizing resins with urea that formulate urea-formaldehyde either prior to going in the end product, or within the end product, seems counter to the intent of this LEED credit. Are melamine urea formaldehyde with added urea formaldehyde acting as a scavenger, and melamine formaldehyde with urea added as a scavenger to bond with loose formaldehyde within a product, acceptable resin technologies considered compliant with LEED EQc4.4?" "Revised ***4/1/2013*** Products using melamine urea formaldehyde (MUF) with added urea formaldehyde acting as a scavenger or melamine formaldehyde with urea added as a scavenger to bond with loose formaldehyde within a product do not automatically meet the credit requirements for IEQ credit 4.4. If the composite wood product using MUF can meet the testing requirements and is found compliant with the California Air Resource Board (CARB) Airborne Toxic Control Measure (ATCM) 93120 requirements for no-added formaldehyde based resins or the requirements for ultra-low-emitting formaldehyde resins (ULEF), the product can contribute to IEQ credit 4.4. Previously, it was unclear how melamine fit within the scope of this credit. This ruling is intended to clarify how to address melamine, not prematurely adopt the LEED v4 credit language for composite wood. Therefore, composite wood products using other amino resins must meet the no added urea-formaldehyde requirements of LEED 2009. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10251" "2012-10-01" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Healthcare" "IEQc4.4: Low-Emitting Materials-Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products/Laminate Adhesives" "Do Thermally Fused Melamine (TFM) laminates fall under the requirements for ""on-site and shop-applied composite wood and agrifiber assemblies?"" \nBecause Thermally Fused Melamine (TFM) is technically a paper product and not a ""plastic"" product, we would appreciate additional clarification whether TFM paper products applied in the manufacturing process fall within the scope of this credit." "No, Thermally Fused Melamine (TFM) laminates do not need to be included in this credit. Laminates are not covered in the scope of this credit. Internationally Applicable." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10267" "2013-01-01" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Healthcare" "IEQc4.3: Low-Emitting Materials-Flooring Systems" "According to footnote 1 on the IEQc4.3 Form, ""Mineral-based finish flooring products such as tile, masonry, terrazzo, and cut stone without any integral organic-based coatings and sealants and unfinished/untreated solid wood flooring qualify for credit without any IAQ testing requirements."" Is it necessary to list them as a material on the form since there is no way to indicate that it is exempt from testing?" "The project team is asking whether mineral-based finish flooring products (without any integral organic-based coatings and sealants) and unfinished/untreated solid wood flooring need to be included on the LEED IEQc4.3 (Low-Emitting Materials - Flooring Systems) Credit Form. Yes, the project team should mark the form to indicate an Alternative Compliance Path. The required narrative for the Alternative Compliance Path must include a statement that the project is applying the April 14, 2010 addenda, as well as the manufacturer and specific product description of the product claiming the exemption. Manufacturer documentation for each product claiming an exemption is NOT required. Applicable Internationally." "100000423, 100000425, 100000142, 100000144" "None" "X" "Reference Guide Correction" "100001807" "2014-04-02" "Healthcare" "IEQc4.1: Low-Emitting Materials " "None" "low-emitting materials - paints and coatings addenda 04/14/2010" "Green Builidng Design and Construction -- Healthcare Supplement, 2009 Edition" "RG:259" "Section 7" "After section 7. Documentation Guidance, add section 9. Exemplary Performance with the following text: ""Projects that comply with all five material groups are eligible for exemplary performance under the Innovation in Design section."""