Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "10031" "2011-05-09" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Are Ecoenergy labeled electricity products applicable for LEED EB O&M EA credit 4: Renewable energy? " "Ecoenergy-labeled electricity products can qualify for EAc4 provided that equivalency with Green-e certification is demonstrated by the project team. The Green-e standard is located on their website: http://wee.green-e.org" "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10032" "2011-05-09" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "For two new buildings being constructed on a campus with an existing solar farm, is it acceptable to submit both these buildings for EAc2, provided that the total amount of energy for which credit is being sought is less than the amount produced by the farm?" "The proposed methodology is acceptable as long as the documentation is provided verifying what percentage of the solar farm is supporting each building and as long as the projected project cost for each project is consistent with the percentage of the solar farm that would need to be installed to support that building. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10033" "2011-05-09" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Is it acceptable to use a mix of 10% biofuel and 90% natural gas to meet the requirements of EAc2, and is there a minimum time period for which the biofuel must be purchased from the utility company?" "For biofuels to qualify, the bio-gas system must meet the requirements as per table 3 of EAc2 as per the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide and a signed declaration from the provider that clearly shows the source must be provided. The intent is for a portion of the building\'s energy to come from biofuel for the duration of its existence. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10126" "2011-11-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare, Hospitality - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings, Schools - Existing Buildings, Retail - Existing Buildings" "The LEED EB:O&M Reference Guide does not specify precisely when during the LEED application review process Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) must be purchased, it only requires that the RECs meet specific percentages of the building\'s total energy use from the performance period.\n\nOur project team would like to wait until after the final review to file an appeal in order to purchase RECs and have EAc4 points included in the project\'s total before accepting certification.\n\nCan EAc4 thresholds be met by RECs purchased after the final review when filed through the appeal process?" "A project team may elect to add and pursue EA c4 as part of an appeal after the project building\'s performance period has ended and after the Final Review has been completed and purchase RECs at that time, as long as the RECs purchased are based on the total annual site energy usage value reported for EAp2 and are allocated to the project building only. Note that at the time of appeal submittal, the project must have entered into a contract or commitment for future purchases to meet the 2-year requirement. Applicable internationally." "400013061/400012752 BDC - Directed Purchase, 400013061/400012752 IDC - Directed Purchase, 10389" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10128" "2011-11-01" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction" "ON-SITE RENEWABLE ENERGY (EA CREDIT 2)\nMULTIPLE CAMPUS SPECIAL ALLOWANCE FOR K-12 SCHOOL DISTRICTS\n\nThe following request is intended to allow K-12 school districts with multiple campuses and multiple LEED projects, to optimize the design, installation and cost of on-site renewable energy systems.\n\nIt is very difficult for older school districts to find sufficient suitable land, parking areas, and structurally adequate building rooftops, on campuses in urban areas, for the installation of renewable energy systems. One campus may have suitable areas while another has no suitable areas. The intent of this LEED interpretation is to allow the one campus within a school district to serve as the on-site renewable systems location for other campuses.\n\nThis request would allow districts to have renewable energy systems in one, or more, centralized areas, and would help optimize the cost and allocation of energy generated by such systems across multiple projects. A school district with multiple campuses is currently forced to located renewables energy systems within a campus boundary. Large corporations and large universities are allowed to located centralized renewable energy systems to serve multiple LEED projects that can separated far from each other. This seems like an unfair benefit intended to help the large property owners. The benefit should be extended to K-12 school districts.\n\nAlthough this LEED interpretation is written based on K-12 schools the USGBC may wish to extend this allowance to other LEED project types.\n\nFor such an allowance to meet the intent of LEED we believe several restrictions should be applied to avoid issues related to owners of multiple properties that the USGBC might be concerned with. The USGBC should adjust and revise the restrictions below to address any issues we may have not considered such that the intent of LEED is met. A possible list of restrictions is provided below for use by the USGBC in developing criteria for this multiple-campus request.\n\n1. Multiple campus properties must all be owned by the same owner. [The USGBC may decide to allow leased properties to be included if certain criteria is met; e.g, length of lease similar to LEED-CI requirements.]\n\n2. The school district must make a commitment and register at least two projects for LEED certification.\n\n3. Each school district property claimed, either as a LEED project or renewables energy generation site, must be located in the same energy services utility district.\n\n4. The K-12 school district boundary area must be contiguous, or maximum distance encompassing the campuses of no greater than 10 miles square (10 x 10 miles). Exceptions to this requirement will be evaluated on their merits.\n\n5. All LEED School Rating systems can use this interpretation, however, specific renewable energy requirements must be met for each different rating system version.\n\n6. The energy generation generation of each separate renewable systems location can be aggregated together. This will create an overall renewable energy generation value that can then be distributed to separate projects. The energy generation of each separate renewable project location must be evaluated based on the renewable energy resources available at each specific location. For example, if the solar energy systems are used the solar energy generation must be based on the actual solar resources for a specific renewable energy source location." "For campus-based projects, such as schools or office complexes, where multiple campuses are under the same ownership, it is permissible to allow one campus to serve as the on-site renewable systems location for other campuses, provided the following criteria have been met:\n1. Multiple campus properties must all be owned by the same owner. \n2. All projects pursuing credit for renewable energy using this compliance path must be registered within 5 years of the initial date of operation of the renewable energy system. \n3. All campuses must be within ten miles of one another (exceptions to this requirement will be evaluated on their merits). Documentation showing boundary and owner information must be submitted with the initial project application, as well as a complete list that includes all projects submitting for LEED certification and all campus on-site renewable energy sites included within this strategy. \n4. The energy generation of each separate renewable systems location can be aggregated together, creating an overall renewable energy generation value that can then be distributed to separate projects. The energy generation of each separate renewable project location must be evaluated based on the renewable energy resources available at each specific location. A letter from the owner must be submitted indicating the amount of site-generated renewable energy allocated to each project building, and verifying that the renewable energy allocated to each project will not be used for any other LEED project certifications (except EB:O&M certifications for projects certified using this methodology). Furthermore, the letter should indicate that the RECs from the installed system belong to the property owner, and have not been sold or given away. Applicable internationally.\n" "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10161" "2012-04-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare, Data centers - New Construction, Hospitality - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings, Schools - Existing Buildings, Retail - Existing Buildings" "Our Campus has a 780 kW PV system installed as a joint venture with a Utility, which was made possible by partial funding from the sale of the REC\'s. The system is installed on 10 existing random building rooftops, with another 136 kW phase nearly commissioned on/near a sports field. We pay a small kWh premium, and will take full ownership after 20 years. PV output is dedicated for campus use, utilizing a combination of direct building connections and connections to the campus owned grid. We would like to apply for EAc2 on a campus basis for approximately 9 separate building projects that do not include their own individual PV installations. The cost to buy REC\'s for 10 years for the entire campus system is prohibitive under our current construction budgets. We propose that individual LEED Building Projects apply for EAC2 using the existing onsite PV renewable source, and buy 10-year REC\'s for 100% of the power claimed on the Template, as qualifying on-site renewable energy. The project REC\'s would be redeemed and solely retained by the individual Building Projects, and would not be shared for use on any other projects. Would purchasing REC\'s then restore the ""associated environmental benefit"" to the on-site generated renewable project energy claimed; and meet the sustainable intent of the credit as indicated in the CIR Ruling dated 7/20/2009?" "The CIR Ruling dated 7/20/2009 (#2616), states that if the project sold renewable energy certificates associated with the on-site renewable energy system, the team may not take credit for the system under EAc2, since the system would have no associated environmental benefit. The project teams approach of purchasing 10-year REC\'s for 100% of the power claimed on the Template, to restore the associated environmental benefit is acceptable. The project must provide sufficient documentation to ensure the portion of the on-site renewable energy system designated for each building is not used on other projects. Additionally, the project team should provide documentation, including contractual terms, to verify the purchase of the necessary volume of REC\'s. The project team may not apply any of the REC\'s purchased to restore the associated environmental benefits of the on-site renewable energy system for the purposes of achieving EAc2 towards achieving EAc6, Green Power." "2616" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1468" "2006-04-04" "New Construction" "Our LEED-NC 2.1 registered project is an office/laboratory building located on a University campus. A single-axis tracking PV generation system, donated to the University by a local electric utility, will be installed on the campus at an optimum location for collecting solar energy. The value of the energy output of the PV system will equal 20% of the total annual energy cost of the registered LEED project and will be applied for points under credits EAc2 and EAc1. The University will own the system and the electricity, which will be delivered directly into the campus grid. A 12/23/2002 CIR ruling for EAc2 states that if a project owner ""...sells the renewable energy credits...then the project cannot apply the corresponding energy to the calculations for this credit or for EAc1."" The Memorandum of Understanding between the University and the local utility states that ""...the REC\'s that will be associated with the PV system shall be retired."" We are seeking LEED Platinum certification and, consequently, each point is critical. We want to be sure that we execute this properly. Therefore: Can we retire the REC\'s and use the value of the generated energy of this PV system toward EAc2 (and EAc1) points? If so, then will a copy of the signed MOU be sufficient proof that this transaction has taken place? Thank you." "The project is seeking to take credit under EAc1 and EAc2 for a campus grid-tied PV-array. The proposed approach is acceptable. Please refer to EAc2.1 ruling dated 5/24/2004 for further details and submittal requirements. Since this is a campus situation, please also refer to the LEED-NC Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (AGMBC) for additional guidance.\n\nUpdate April 15, 2011: Please note that all 2009 projects in multiple building situations must follow the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects, located here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=7987. 2009 project teams should check this document for up to date guidance on all multiple building issues. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1485" "2006-05-16" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "This is an EAc2 administrative clarification ruling regarding the sale of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), valuation of on-site renewable energy generation, and separate ownership of the building and the on-site system." "In a previous ruling (EAc2.1 CIR Ruling 12-23-02), it was determined that the sale of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) from an on-site renewable energy system was prohibited if that system received EAc2 points. This ruling is an update and supersedes the previous ruling. This ruling also establishes requirements to be met if the building owner does not also own the on-site renewable energy system. To encourage the greater development of on-site renewable energy systems, the sale of RECs is allowed from an on-site renewable energy system that claims credit under EAc2 if the building owner or energy system owner, either separately or acting together, meet the following conditions: 1. They purchase an equivalent number of RECs equal to 200% of the system\'s annual rated energy output each year from another source, which must be Green-e eligible. The system\'s rated output must reflect all system performance characteristics as well as actual local site conditions (e.g., climate, mounting location and angles, etc.). The rationale for the 1-for-2 ratio is that many states have set Renewable Portfolio Standards and in-state renewable energy targets that can be traded in the form of credits. These in-state RECs are typically more expensive to achieve and typically cost a lot more (e.g. $0.05/kWh for New England wind power vs. $0.01/kWh for RECs from West Texas or Dakotas wind). From an environmental and financial perspective these are not the same for a couple of reasons: a. Emissions reduction impacts other than CO2 are less in remote areas than in the congested areas in state where population is concentrated and where RECs are largely purchased. b. Distant renewable energy generation may be stranded by limited T&D capacity. Given that in-state RECs create more benefits than out-of-state RECs for non-CO2 impact but equal for CO2 impact, it was decided to allow in-state to be replaced by out-of-state on a 1 for 2 basis. This allows green building projects to capture the value of RECs created by on-site renewables while resulting in net reduction of CO2. 2. The seller of the on-site RECs must fully follow all established guidelines for the sale of RECs and not claim any of the environmental attributes for the on-site system. Example: An on-site solar system in New Jersey produces 100,000 solar kWh per year. These RECs may be sold provided the building or solar system owner purchases 200,000 kWh of Green-e eligible RECs to offset the sale of the on-site solar RECs. The offset purchase must occur for every year in which the on-site RECs are sold and are in addition to any RECs purchased to meet EAc6. To determine the value of the energy cost savings in EAc2 compliance calculations, the project team may include both of the following components, each of which must be listed separately in the credit documentation: 1) the cost of the energy no longer purchased from the supplier because of the on-site generation; and 2) the actual and/or fair market value of the RECs sold. If an on-site renewable energy system is owned and operated by an entity other then the building owner, the following must also occur to receive credit under EAc2: 1. There must be at least a 10-year contract for the purchase of the energy output by the building owner. 2. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the energy output. 3. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner, either separately or acting together, must make the 200% offset REC purchase referenced above for at least 10 years. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1495" "2006-05-16" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "This is an EAc2 administrative clarification ruling regarding the sale of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), valuation of on-site renewable energy generation, and separate ownership of the building and the on-site system." "In a previous ruling (EAc2.1 CIR Ruling 12-23-02), it was determined that the sale of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) from an on-site renewable energy system was prohibited if that system received EAc2 points. This ruling is an update and supersedes the previous ruling. This ruling also establishes requirements to be met if the building owner does not also own the on-site renewable energy system. To encourage the greater development of on-site renewable energy systems, the sale of RECs is allowed from an on-site renewable energy system that claims credit under EAc2 if the building owner or energy system owner, either separately or acting together, meet the following conditions: 1. They purchase an equivalent number of RECs equal to 200% of the system\'s annual rated energy output each year from another source, which must be Green-e eligible. The system\'s rated output must reflect all system performance characteristics as well as actual local site conditions (e.g., climate, mounting location and angles, etc.). The rationale for the 1-for-2 ratio is that many states have set Renewable Portfolio Standards and in-state renewable energy targets that can be traded in the form of credits. These in-state RECs are typically more expensive to achieve and typically cost a lot more (e.g. $0.05/kWh for New England wind power vs. $0.01/kWh for RECs from West Texas or Dakotas wind). From an environmental and financial perspective these are not the same for a couple of reasons: a. Emissions reduction impacts other than CO2 are less in remote areas than in the congested areas in state where population is concentrated and where RECs are largely purchased. b. Distant renewable energy generation may be stranded by limited T&D capacity. Given that in-state RECs create more benefits than out-of-state RECs for non-CO2 impact but equal for CO2 impact, it was decided to allow in-state to be replaced by out-of-state on a 1 for 2 basis. This allows green building projects to capture the value of RECs created by on-site renewables while resulting in net reduction of CO2. 2. The seller of the on-site RECs must fully follow all established guidelines for the sale of RECs and not claim any of the environmental attributes for the on-site system. Example: An on-site solar system in New Jersey produces 100,000 solar kWh per year. These RECs may be sold provided the building or solar system owner purchases 200,000 kWh of Green-e eligible RECs to offset the sale of the on-site solar RECs. The offset purchase must occur for every year in which the on-site RECs are sold and are in addition to any RECs purchased to meet EAc6. To determine the value of the energy cost savings in EAc2 compliance calculations, the project team may include both of the following components, each of which must be listed separately in the credit documentation: 1) the cost of the energy no longer purchased from the supplier because of the on-site generation; and 2) the actual and/or fair market value of the RECs sold. If an on-site renewable energy system is owned and operated by an entity other then the building owner, the following must also occur to receive credit under EAc2: 1. There must be at least a 10-year contract for the purchase of the energy output by the building owner. 2. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the energy output. 3. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner, either separately or acting together, must make the 200% offset REC purchase referenced above for at least 10 years. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1500" "2006-05-16" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell" "The mechanical systems for this project are geothermal in nature. Water is extracted from a 250\' deep well drilled into quartzite bedrock and extracted at approximately 51" "The system as described in the CIR is a combined passive geothermal heat exchange / ground source heat pump system. Per the v2.1 Reference Guide (pages 155 and 157) these types of systems do not qualify for points under this category because they do not generate energy. In general, environmental heat sources and sinks with a low temperature difference relative to room air conditions are not considered renewable energy sources in EAc2 in LEED-NC v2.1 or v2.2. The energy saving benefits of these types of systems may be applied to EAc1 calculations. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1507" "2006-07-07" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "This is an administrative ruling posted by USGBC updating the definition of qualifying renewable energy. This ruling covers two aspects of that definition." "First, the LEED-NC v2.2Reference Guide First Edition (October 2005) includes a clerical error regarding the eligibility of bio-fuels. Table 3, p. 199 only references electricity production from bio-fuels, whereas it should reference all energy production from bio-fuels. Any energy produced from the eligible fuels qualifies for points in EAc2, and any energy produced from the ineligible fuels does not qualify. Second, LEED-NC v2.2 uses a broader definition of renewable energy compared to v2.1 that provides more flexibility for project teams. This administrative ruling authorizes v2.1 projects to use any of the allowable forms of renewable energy described on pp. 198-199 of the v2.2 Reference Guide. The eligible and ineligible forms of renewable energy are summarized in the following tables: Table 1: EA Credit 2 Eligible On-Site Renewable Energy Systems " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1586" "2006-10-03" "New Construction" "We have reviewed the administrative clarification credit ruling regarding Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) and dated 5/16/2006. It discusses two items: 1. the sale of RECs, valuation of on-site renewable energy generation, and 2. separate ownership of the building and the on-site system. Please confirm that item 2 only applies if item 1 applies. For example: if the renewable system owner retains the REC associated with the power it produces and does not sell or trade the REC then: 1. an on-site renewable energy system may be owned and operated by an entity other than the building owner, and 2. the system does not need to meet the three qualifiers listed at the end of the REC ruling dated 5/16/2006, and 3. the building owner can still receive EA-c1 points, and 4. the building owner can still receive EA-c2 points. In our case, the renewable energy system owner is the local utility. The building owner is committed to long-term on-site renewable energy generation through an agreement with the utility. We believe this situation clearly meets the intent of the credit: to increase the level of on-site renewable energy supply." "Each topic addressed in the CIR ruling dated 5/16/2006 (sale of RECs vs. ownership of the on-site system) is an independent ruling that stands alone. Thus, in the applicant\'s situation, the project needs to demonstrate the following: 1. There is a minimum 10-year contract with the local utility to purchase energy generated by the proposed system. 2. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the energy output. 3. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner must make the 200% offset REC purchase described in the first portion of the CIR for at least 10 years. The project will be eligible to achieve points under EAc2 and take credit for the system under EAc1, as long as the project can comply with the three points outlined above, and provided that the system meets the requirements of on-site renewable energy sources as per EAc2 administrative CIR ruling dated 7/7/2006. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1653" "2007-01-12" "New Construction" "We are in preliminary design of a new office building at a municipal wastewater treatment plant. The plant has made a significant ongoing investment to generate energy by recovering bio-gas from the wastewater treatment process, approximately 20% of the total electricity use for the wastewater treatment plant is currently met by on-site generation from bio-gas. Exact quantities would be detailed as part of the submittal. This raises several issues: Are we eligible to receive credit under the LEED EA Credits 1 and 2? If the plant is generating 15% of its total electricity use(existing plant electricity use+new office building electricity use) from bio-gas can we take credit on the office building project for 15% of the new office building\'s electrical use as renewable energy? These are approximate, exact numbers would need to be worked out on a cost basis, but may be 10% of total energy cost. We are not looking to preferentially assign this generation to the office building, but it seems fair to credit the sewerage district for their very significant investment in bio-gas generation. This also seems conservative as it would only take credit for the pro-rated energy use of the office building, and does not attempt to take credit for the significant additional amount of bio-gas used to generate power to operate the remainder of the plant. If this is acceptable, does the new office building need to be on the same meter to take credit for the renewable energy generation? Due to the size of the campus, it may be more cost effective to have the utility add a small transformer to feed the new office building rather than extend feeds from the existing plant transformers. The total energy use and bio-gas generation would not be affected. Finally, the sewerage district is planning a project to significantly increase the amount of bio-gas it is utilizing by increasing generator run hours and installing additional bio-gas storage. If using the total percentage of electricity generated by bio-gas as proposed above is not acceptable due to the fact that the generators are already in place, does the fact that there is a project planned to increase the bio-gas use change this? If what is proposed above is not acceptable, can we take credit under the new office building project for a prorated amount of the additional generation? For example, if the project increases the bio-gas capacity by 5% of the total plant electrical use, could we take credit for 5% renewable energy on the office building project? All of the above assumes that REC\'s will not be sold or will be addressed as described in earlier CIR\'s. We will also calculate percentages on an energy cost basis. Percentages would be based on the simulated building energy use and the actual plant bio-gas capacity at the time of the submittal and may vary somewhat from the examples above." "The applicant is requesting credit for the use of on-campus bio-gas generation and electricity generation under EAc1 and EAc2. It appears from the description above that the sewage treatment plant itself is not a part of the LEED scope of the project. In this case, electricity generated on-site will work the same as for a campus-wide central plant situation where the project purchases energy from the central plant; in this case, the bio-gas powered generators. The project will have to develop a method to account for the energy cost of such an energy source. The other option is to include the entire sewage treatment plant in the LEED scope of work, include process energy used for the sewage treatment itself in the energy analysis, and then take credit for on-site offsets due to bio-gas generation. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1789" "2007-06-15" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our project is a 238,000 SF brick manufacturing facility in Terre Haute, Indiana. The project consists of 5,000 SF of office space and 233,000 SF of manufacturing area, including extrusion, drying, and kiln equipment. The energy required for the manufacturing process exceeds 90% of the facility\'s total energy load. We are submitting a separate CIR to address quantifying energy savings for the manufacturing process. In the brick industry, the typical manufacturing process (specifically the kiln) utilizes natural gas as a primary energy source. To maximize energy savings and reduce the environmental and economic impact of brick-making, our Client has selected a site that is directly adjacent to a municipal landfill, with plans to fuel the kiln with methane off-gassing from the landfill. Currently, the methane is collected, burned, and flared directly into the atmosphere; however, it can be contained, cleaned and pressurized so that it may be used constructively in lieu of natural gas. Our Client has obtained permission from the landfill to tap into this energy source. As part of our project scope, we will install compressors and an underground pipeline to transport the landfill gas to the manufacturing facility. This will replace the majority of natural gas that powers the kiln and vastly reduce the amount of on-grid energy required by the facility. Our Client will install and maintain all equipment required to prepare, transport, and apply this methane to the manufacturing process. Other than allowing us to tap into this un-used resource, the operator of the landfill will have no involvement or responsibility in this venture. Please verify that landfill off-gassing qualifies for credit under EA credit 2 in this case, even though the landfill itself is not owned by our client or located within our project site. We will calculate renewable energy as a percentage of the total building annual energy cost, including process energy." "Yes, the system described meets the requirements needed to achieve credit under EAc2, despite the fact that the source of the energy (here, the landfill gas) is not directly on site. Because the project owner will install and maintain the equipment for the land fill gas extraction, and be the sole user of the gas, the renewable energy system falls under the LEED scope of the project and can effectively be considered ""on-site."" However, in order for this project to achieve LEED-NC v2.2 EAc2 credits, the following conditions need to be met: 1) Because the landfill gas will be used to in lieu of natural gas in a manufacturing process, the full process loads must be included in all energy cost and use estimates, whether or not the project is attempting to earn any credits under EAc1 (it is not clear from the CIR if full energy modeling will be performed for this credit). As per LEED-NC v2.2 EAc1 CIR ruling dated 5/13/2007, a full description will need to be provided of how the baseline and proposed energy usage were estimated for the project, as industrial energy usage does not fall under the purview of ASHRAE 90.1-2004. Because of the nature of this project, the EAc2 compliance path using CBECS data to estimate annual energy costs is not appropriate. 2) As per the LEED-NC v2.2 EAc2 Reference Guide language, the method used to predict the quantity of energy generated by on-site renewable systems should be clearly stated in the LEED submittal narrative... Cost savings from renewable energy systems\' shall be reported exclusive of energy costs associated with system operation (i.e., deduct energy costs of pumps, fans, and other auxiliary devices). 3) Because the landfill is on municipal property, but the gas extraction system will be privately owned by the project owner, a clear chain of custody for rights to the gas and the associated Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) needs to be documented. Based on the documentation requirements outlined in the LEED-NC v2.1 EAc2.1CIR ruling dated 10/3/2006 (which specifically addressed third party ownership of a renewable energy system) the following requirements need to be met: A. There is a minimum 10-year contract with the local municipality to secure the rights to the landfill gas that will be used in the project. B. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the landfill gas. C. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner must make the 200% offset REC purchase described in the first portion of the CIR for at least 10 years. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1842" "2007-07-19" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "This is an administrative ruling posted by USGBC updating the conditions that must be met for a project to take credit for renewable energy under EAc2." "A previous ruling (EAc2.1 CIR Ruling 10-03-2006), defined conditions that must be met for projects to qualify for renewable energy credits under EAc2. This ruling updates the previous ruling defining alternative conditions for projects to qualify for EAc2 renewable energy credits. A project will be eligible to achieve points under EAc2 and qualify for renewable energy credits for the system under EAc1 if the project meets the following conditions: 1 The renewable energy system is installed within the boundaries of the project or on the project site. 2 The renewable energy system is connected immediately adjacent to the utility meter. 3 A 10-year (minimum) contract for on-site generation with the owner of the Energy System is established. 4 The RECs associated with the renewable energy system are not sold. 5 The Energy System owner does not count the RECs associated with the renewable energy system to meet a mandated renewable portfolio standard goal or provides the RECs to the project owner. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1846" "2007-08-13" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction" "A new classroom building on a K-12 school campus with multiple buildings will have a PV array that will supply 7.11% of the total site energy cost as renewable energy, according to CBECS data. The team assumes that 20% of the popwer generated by the system will go to the new building and would like to pursue EA 2 based on this percentage. What additional documentation or extra steps or alternative compliance documentation would be necessary to support this credit? We understand the future planned buildings cannot take credit for the 20% that this building is claiming." "Documentation and calculation would need to be provided per the credit requirements, which are based on Energy Cost. There are two methods available for calculating the percentage (including one using the CBECS data). A narrative describing the overall plan including the reasoning behind the assumption of 20% of the generated power being applied to the building would also need to be provided. Project teams should document the present and future allocations of the energy supplied by the PV system. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2168" "2008-05-28" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction" "See below for treatment of District Thermal Energy systems in LEED-NCv2.2, LEED-CSv2.0, LEED-Schools, and LEED-CIv2.0." "USGBC has developed a document that clarifies how district or campus heating or cooling systems are to be treated in all Energy and Atmosphere prerequisites and credits for LEED-NC, LEED-CS, LEED-Schools, and SSc1, Options K & L under LEED-CI. That document is available for download from the LEED Reference Documents page, here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=4176. All LEED-NC, LEED-CS, LEED-Schools, and LEED-CI projects involving district or campus heating or cooling systems that registered for LEED after this posting date must follow that guidance, and such projects that registered before this date may optionally follow that guidance." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2178" "2008-05-28" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "See below for treatment of District Thermal Energy systems in LEED-NCv2.2, LEED-CSv2.0, and LEED-CIv2.0." "USGBC has developed a document that clarifies how district or campus heating or cooling systems are to be treated in all Energy and Atmosphere prerequisites and credits for LEED-NC, LEED-CS, and SSc1, Options K & L under LEED-CI. That document is available for download from the LEED Reference Documents page, here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=4176. All LEED-NC, LEED-CS, and LEED-CI projects involving district or campus heating or cooling systems that registered for LEED after this posting date must follow that guidance, and such projects that registered before this date may optionally follow that guidance." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2199" "2008-06-04" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction" "See below for treatment of District Thermal Energy systems in LEED-NCv2.2, LEED-CSv2.0, LEED-Schools, and LEED-CIv2.0." "USGBC has developed a document that clarifies how district or campus heating or cooling systems are to be treated in all Energy and Atmosphere prerequisites and credits for LEED-NC, LEED-CS, LEED-Schools, and SSc1, Options K & L under LEED-CI. That document is available for download from the LEED Reference Documents page, here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=4176. All LEED-NC, LEED-CS, LEED-Schools, and LEED-CI projects involving district or campus heating or cooling systems that registered for LEED after this posting date must follow that guidance, and such projects that registered before this date may optionally follow that guidance." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2226" "2008-06-21" "New Construction" "This is an administrative ruling posted by USGBC updating the definition of qualifying renewable energy. This ruling covers two aspects of that definition. Please note this CIR was originally posted under NCv2.1, dated 5/18/2006." "First, the LEED-NC v2.2Reference Guide First Edition (October 2005) includes a clerical error regarding the eligibility of bio-fuels. Table 3, p. 199 only references electricity production from bio-fuels, whereas it should reference all energy production from bio-fuels. Any energy produced from the eligible fuels qualifies for points in EAc2, and any energy produced from the ineligible fuels does not qualify. Second, LEED-NC v2.2 uses a broader definition of renewable energy compared to v2.1 that provides more flexibility for project teams. This administrative ruling authorizes v2.1 projects to use any of the allowable forms of renewable energy described on pp. 198-199 of the v2.2 Reference Guide. The eligible and ineligible forms of renewable energy are summarized in the following tables: Table 1: EA Credit 2 Eligible On-Site Renewable Energy Systems \nPhotovoltaic systems \nSolar thermal systems " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2297" "2008-08-26" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our community college campus includes an existing 1.06mW solar field that backfeeds two existing metered services. Additional metered services on the campus are serviced by the utility company campus \'loop\', but are not fed directly by the solar array. The solar array currently accounts for 25% of power provided to the existing campus (documentation available). Two new buildings are under construction on campus. Building A is a new 60,000 s.f., 3-story Office and Administration building, which is fed by one of the two metered electrical services tied directly to the solar array. Building B is a 77,000 s.f., two-story Fine Arts facility, which will require a new metered service from the utility company campus \'loop\', but are not fed directly by the solar array. A CIR Ruling dated 08/13/2007 implies that an existing PV array may be applied to new construction on a campus, therefore we would like to pursue EA credit #2 for both projects. Our intent is to provide documentation to express the anticipated annual energy use of each new building as a percentage of the overall energy use on campus, and to apply the same percentage of the power generated by the solar array towards this credit." "The project team is requesting clarification on whether or not EAc2 can be pursued for new campus projects when a solar PV array previously exists. Under the LEED Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=1097) it states: In the case where the renewable energy equipment is not physically located on the applicant building(s), provide data for each building showing the projected energy consumption and the percentage to be met with their prorated or dedicated share of renewable energy. The owner should also submit a certification letter acknowledging that the renewable energy from a central system will apply only to the submitted project(s) and will not be applied to subsequent buildings for any future LEED certifications. Thus, both projects can pursue EAc2, provided a previously undedicated share of renewable energy generated is allocated to each building project. \n \nUpdate April 15, 2011: Please note that all 2009 projects in multiple building situations must follow the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects, located here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=7987. 2009 project teams should check this document for up to date guidance on all multiple building issues. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2307" "2008-09-30" "New Construction" "As stated in the administrative posting dated 6/21/2008: ""Any energy produced from the eligible fuels qualifies for points in EAc2, and any energy produced from the ineligible fuels does not qualify."" We are looking for clarification on how to determine the qualifying fuels contribution to the credit criteria. Our project looks to use bio-diesel fired boilers with absorptive chillers to accommodate both the heating and cooling loads for the building. The LEED reference guide standards allow for the use of bio-diesel but does not specify what blend of bio-diesel is necessary to qualify for the credit or how to calculate the contribution. Based on the administrative ruling, we propose that the qualifying percentage of bio-based diesel vs. traditional diesel in the blend be used to determine the level of contribution EAc2. For example, if a B20 bio-diesel blend is used (20% bio/80% traditional diesel)then 20% of the energy produced by the bio-diesel is applicable towards the EAc2 Renewable Energy credit thresholds. If B100 is used, then 100% of the energy is applicable. Please advise if this compliance path is acceptable." "The applicant is requesting clarification regarding whether energy production from bio-diesel may be used to achieve credit for EAc2. Only 100% bio-diesel fuel (i.e., B100) may be considered as an eligible bio-fuel. In order to satisfy the credit intent, the project team must demonstrate a 2 year commitment to the use of B100 bio-diesel. Please note that the EA TAG committee will provide a more comprehensive definition of eligible renewable sources in the future that may supersede this ruling. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2384" "2008-12-02" "New Construction" "We are building a new hospital in Oak Bluffs, MA, the Martha\'s Vineyard Hospital. We are registered with LEED under NC2.2 We are installing a 45 KW solar photovoltaic system on the project. An inherent quality to a hospital is the facility being in operation 24 hours per day, and due to that and other hospital specific qualities, we use more energy for example than a commercial office building. QUESTION----can we submit under ALTERNATIVE COMPLIANCE for this credit, and use the GREEN GUIDE FOR HEALTHCARE as a basis for this credit, in lieu of the LEED NC2.2 requirements? We are spending $400,000 on a 45KW solar PV system, we do not meet LEED NC2.2 requirements, but will likely meet the Green Guide for Healthcare EA credit 2 requirements." "The applicant is requesting that the renewable energy requirements from the Green Guide for Healthcare be used in lieu of the requirements in the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide for EAc2. This approach is not acceptable. All project teams registered under the LEED-NC v2.2 rating system must satisfy the requirements of EAc2 to achieve points for on-site renewable energy. Green Guide for Healthcare is not an equivalent rating system to LEED-NC v2.2. LEED for Healthcare will specifically focus on healthcare projects and is expected to be launched in Summer 2009 pending USGBC approval." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2473" "2009-04-15" "New Construction" "A private company is building their new corporate headquarters in Madrid, Spain. The Spanish Building Technical Code requires by law that all new and newly renovated buildings use solar energy via solar hot water installed onsite in order to supply the domestic hot water systems demand. This national requirement will achieve a 2,5% of onsite renewable energy for the proposed building. Additionally, Spanish National Decree (Regulation published by Executive Order) provides government subsidy to owners and investors that install solar photovoltaic arrays on their building roofs and supply the kW to the national grid. This renewable energy production is then supplied by the electric provider to meet local energy demand. The requirements of the credit states: Use on-site renewable energy systems to offset building energy cost. Calculate project performance by expressing the energy produced by the renewable systems as a percentage of the building annual energy cost [....]. We seek confirmation on whether the onsite production through solar photovoltaic systems for public grid supply meets the credit intent for EAc2. Can the subsidized price be applied to the calculations required for compliance with this credit intent?" "The applicant is requesting clarification if an on-site installed renewable energy system that ties into the grid directly without connecting to the building meets the requirements of EA credit 2 and if the subsidized price can be applied to the calculations. 1. The owner of the on-site PV system (or the entity that has entered into a Power Purchasing Agreement to have PV installed on their property) is the key criteria here, not which side of the meter the energy seeps into. It should be noted that environmental benefits can only be claimed once. In cases where a building that hosts a PV system does not use the PV and/or the PV is fully financed, owned and sold to third parties, the host is not entitled to LEED recognition or REC value, unless the RECs are repurchased by the building owner. Only under such conditions of electricity generation using an on-site PV system, 100% of RECs need be repurchased when hosted on the same building. 2. No, subsidized price cannot be applied to the calculations. Applicable Internationally; Europe; Spain. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2591" "2009-07-30" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) is using a high quality wood-burning masonry heater to provide about 10% of its building\'s annual energy budget, directly as heat. Remaining heat is provided by an oil-fired hydronic system, supplemented by solar thermal collectors. We are requesting approval of this masonry heater as a renewable heat source for both EA-1x Energy Optimization and EA-2.3 Renewable Energy on the following grounds: The masonry heater serves as an element of research, training and demonstration for clean and renewable wood heat. The masonry heater is used and managed as part of CCHRC\'s research mission and building operations. It is monitored regularly for temperature, weight of wood input and weight of ash output. The masonry heater is fueled once per business day when heating is required. It provides significant heat for the 2 story east end of the building from its location near an open stairway in the building\'s lobby. Wood used at this facility is sustainably harvested in local woodland and grounds management. Firewood is supplied by CCHRC\'s land owner, University of Alaska Fairbanks, from its maintenance and construction clearing operations. In addition, firewood may be cut on nearby designated, managed State land areas after a permit is obtained: http://forestry.alaska.gov/wood/firewood.html Plentiful, regulated forest land areas near this site make firewood a renewable, local energy source which will be available for the life of the building. The standard \'Envirotech\' masonry heater core ( http://www.timelyconstruction.com/index.htm ) has been tested for particulate emissions by Myren Consulting, Inc., an accredited third party testing agency. Average particulate grams per kg. of wood: ASTM Standard Crib Fuel; 0.8193 g/kg., Cord wood: 0.8155 g/kg. These values meet or exceed those for allowable wood pellet stoves, relieving concerns that incomplete or poor combustion can produce pollution; expressed on page 154 of the Version 2.1 Reference Guide. Masonry heaters also have a burn-efficiency similar to that of oil-fired boilers. Most oil-fired boilers can be set to burn at 85-87% efficiency maximum due to the problems inherent in managing oil-emission condensate that occurs when oil is burned at a higher efficiency rate. Masonry heaters similarly burn the wood at around 85% efficiency. However, CCHRC\'s masonry heater is fired only once per day instead of running continuously through the day. Also, data that we have on PM2.5 emissions clearly shows that masonry heaters contribute fewer PM2.5 emissions to the atmosphere than oil-fired boilers. Furthermore, because the Masonry Heater burns so effectively, CCHRC uses less than 2 cords of wood per year. Masonry heaters are approved under LEED for Homes with where potential for \'backdraft\' is minimized and has been documented. The masonry heater in this building meets these requirements. In addition, atmospheric pressure inside the building is monitored by the building automation system, which can notify the building manager in the unlikely event that significant negative pressure occurs. In conclusion, we believe the masonry heater should be credited for this project because its fuel is renewable & low in embodied energy, its particulate emissions are lower than the oil boilers, and its use is carefully measured & managed. It benefits the environment by lowering fossil fuel consumption and carbon footprint." "The project is seeking clarification that the firewood supplied by the land owner as well as wood harvested from a neighboring state forest can be considered as renewable source for EAc2. The project team is using a high quality wood-burning masonry heater. It is acceptable to use forest residue provided it is obtained from a sustainably managed source and harvested from a site that is contiguous to the project site and has the same owner. Provide documentation consisting of a Sustainability Management plan for the local woodland and any permits from state forests. The documentation should also include quantified energy demand and supply relationships. Applicable internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2594" "2009-08-21" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our project is installing a photovoltaic system that will be directly connected to the building\'s energy system, and which will be net-metered with the utility grid. The system is being financed through a power purchase agreement, which requires selling of the RECs to the public utility. A number of Credit Interpretation Rulings have been issued regarding the conditions which must be met for a project to qualify for renewable energy credits under EAc2. These CIRs seem to provide conflicting language. We are seeking clarification regarding these conditions for LEED-NCv2.2 and LEED-CSv2.0 projects. - CIRs dated 10/3/2006 and 5/16/2006 state that the sale of RECs is allowed from an on-site renewable energy system that claims credit under EAc2 if the building owner or energy system owner purchases a total amount of RECs equal to 200% of the system\'s annual rated energy output each year from another source, which must be Green-e eligible. Per the CIRs, the seller of the on-site RECs must also follow all established guidelines for the sale of RECs and not claim any of the environmental attributes for the on-site system. - An administrative ruling dated 7/19/2007, which updates conditions for on-site renewable systems to achieve EAc2 points, does not make reference to the purchase of 200% RECs as an acceptable method of credit achievement. - However, the same 200% REC purchase compliance path is also outlined in the new LEED 2009 BD&C Reference Guide. - A CIR dated April 15, 2009 rules that a project that hosts a PV system, which does not use the PV and/or the PV is fully financed, owned and sold to third parties, can achieve EAc2 by purchasing a total amount of RECs equal to 100% of the system\'s annual rated energy output. Please confirm that a project pursuing EAc2 under LEED-NC v2.2 (or LEED-CSv2.0) can achieve EAc2 points by utilizing the 200% REC purchase methodology as outlined in the 2006 CIRs and 2009 BD&C Reference Guide, or the 100% REC purchase methodology outlined in the 2009 CIR. We are also seeking clarification regarding the length of time for which RECs must be purchased. The 5/16/2006 CIR states that RECs must be purchased ""each year."" Does this mean that RECs must be purchased each year that the system\'s RECs are sold, indefinitely? Alternatively, the 10/3/2006 CIR states that RECs must be purchased for at least ten years. Please clarify if the REC purchase is required for 10 years, or for the entire length of the utility REC purchase agreement." "The applicant is asking for clarification on the quantity and length of time for which RECs need to be purchased in order to achieve credit for On-Site Renewable energy that is sold to the grid. Most of the various CIRs referenced by the applicant are relevant; some of these rulings appear to add confusion to the quantity of RECs that are needed. It has been determined that the project can achieve EAc2 by purchasing a total amount of RECs equal to 100% of the system\'s annual rated energy output. There must be at least a 10-year contract for the purchase of the energy output. This CIR supersedes the 200% requirement set by the CIR Ruling dated 5/16/2006. Please note this CIR only dictates the quantity of RECs and the duration and other requirements related to documentation and green-e stay valid as stated in the 5/16/2006 and other CIRs." "100000887, 100000679" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2616" "2009-07-20" "New Construction" "Oman Botanic Garden is a broad scale botanic reserve in Muscat, Oman. We are preparing a design submission for our 3 LEED nominated buildings and associated landscape areas. The LEED project footprint is within a much larger general project area of some 550 hectares. A large ""Solar Farm"" (greater than 5000m2 in area) is proposed to provide renewable energy to a number of buildings and services within the Oman Botanic Garden. This renewable energy facility is located within the project boundary but outside of the nominated LEED building/landscape footprint. It is expected that this PV facility can provide up to 40% (600 kW) of the LEED buildings energy requirements. We note from previous CIRs that renewable energy facilities within a campus precinct but outside of the nominated LEED boundary have been accepted as Onsite Renewable Energy sources. Can you please advise whether we would be able to satisfy the Credit Points for Onsite Renewable Energy (12.5% 3 points) AND the requirements for Green Power as 35% of the LEED buildings energy needs are provided by a ""green power"". The LEED manual dictates that Green Power must be accredited or have RECs, TRCs or similar. There is currently no process to source such renewable energy certificates in Oman so accreditation for our project may be difficult. Can you please confirm that our proposal meets the requirements of the Green Power credit point? It is envisaged that the planned renewable power source will meet the 35% requirement for the LEED buildings for up to 25 years. Accordingly will we be eligible for the Exemplary Performance credit?" "The project team is requesting clarification on the breakdown between EA credit 2 and EA credit 6 for a large solar PV array proposed. For EA credit 2 – As long as the Owner of the project can certify that the energy generated from the Solar PV array installed in this phase of the project will be associate only to the three buildings that are part of this LEED submission, then all the energy generated from the PV array can be taken credit for those three buildings under EA credit 2. Please note that calculations for EA credit 2 are based on energy cost and not on peak power offset. EA credit 6 – the intent of this credit is to encourage the development of green power generation in the country where the project is located. If your country does not have any programs that allow these to happen, then EA credit 6 is not applicable to the project. Please also note that if the project sold the renewable energy certificates associated with the PV array, the team will not be able to take credit for the array under EA credit 2 since now the PV array has no associated environmental benefit on-site. As such the project is not eligible to attempt exemplary performance under EA credit 6, but may be eligible to attempt exemplary performance under EA credit 2. Applicable Internationally; Middle East; Oman. " "10161" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "436" "2002-12-23" "New Construction" "The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Green Office Building will utilize 2.51% renewable energy from photovoltaics collector panels on the roof of the building. The power generated from the PV installation will be used within the building to offset the energy consumption and any surplus energy will be reverse metered. The Center for Resource Solutions (CRS) has a program known as ""green tags which are sold by those investing in the cost of a renewable system to individuals, businesses or other organizations, to help support their financial investment. ""Green Tags"" are the value of the environmental benefits of renewable energy, not the energy itself. DNR would like to sell the Green Tags that this renewable energy will produce. We would like to make certain that participating in the Green Tag program will not negate or effect the calculation for the LEED point for Renewable Energy Credit 2.0. What is a Green Tag? Tradable Renewable Certificates Can Earn Green-e Quality Certification. The Center for Resource Solutions (CRS) has announced that Green-e certification is now available for tradable renewable energy certificates (TRCs)--also known as ""green tags."" TRCs are an innovative market mechanism with potential to greatly expand markets for renewable energy, and the availability of Green-e Certification will improve customer confidence and facilitate rapid, successful growth of these exciting new markets. TRCs certified by Green-e will directly support generation from newly developed renewable energy facilities--facilities that generate electricity from the sun, the wind, the heat of the Earth, low impact hydropower, or organic fuels (biomass). These certificates are created when a renewable energy facility generates electricity. Because the certificates represent all the features of renewable electricity except the electricity itself, they can be marketed as a separate product and sold, traded, or retired anywhere in the country. The part of renewable energy that is not electricity includes a growing list of valuable attributes, including many positive environmental benefits. TRCs bundle these attributes into a single, marketable commodity. TRCs can be sold independently or combined with ""generic"" electricity to provide customers with all the benefits of renewable electricity service. Web site - http://www.resource-solutions.org/Green-epage.htm." "[Please note that this ruling is expanded upon in the ruling dated 5/16/06.] The project cannot both sell the environmental benefit of the renewable power AND claim these benefits for the project. The principle of Green-e TRCs is that only one entity may claim or purchase the environmental benefit of a given unit of renewable energy. In the same vein, if the project sells the environmental benefit of renewable energy generated on-site to others, what remains at the project is only \'electricity\' without an associated environmental benefit. This would mean that the project forgoes its ability to qualify for this credit in order to sell the environmental benefit to someone else. If the DNR sells its renewable energy credits to Green-e, then the project cannot apply the corresponding energy to the calculations for this credit or for EA credit 1." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5069" "2007-09-18" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction" "Description Our project is a newly constructed building on a college campus. Adjacent to the proposed building is an existing athletic complex with a 40,000 sq ft flat rooftop. The client wishes to install solar arrays on the roof of the athletic complex which would tie into the electrical grid on campus. The grid is monitored by a single meter. The solar panels will be installed concurrently with the new building and will be intended to offset a significant portion of the load that the new building would add to the total campus energy consumption. The campus has no other new construction projects in the foreseeable future. Proposal Since the solar array and new building will be installed concurrently, the new energy consumption of the campus will be the addition of the new building energy consumption minus the generated solar power. It seems that all of the generated power could be applied to the new building, especially since no other buildings are going for LEED accreditation. We propose that the entire load generated by the solar array be applied to the new building. Please rule on the acceptability of this approach." "The applicant is requesting confirmation that this credit may be earned from a solar array located outside of the boundaries of the project site on the same campus as the project is located. The proposed action meets the intent of the credit, and is a viable path for credit achievement. As indicated in the ""LEED-NC Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects"" (https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=1097), the applicant must provide data showing the projected energy consumption of the building being submitted, and the percentage to be met with their dedicated share of renewable energy. The owner should also submit a certification letter acknowledging that the renewable energy from the remotely located renewable energy system will apply only to the submitted project, and will not be applied to any subsequent buildings for any future LEED certifications.\n\nUpdate April 15, 2011: Please note that all 2009 projects in multiple building situations must follow the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects, located here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=7987. 2009 project teams should check this document for up to date guidance on all multiple building issues. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5181" "2009-02-09" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Question: Are perforated metal wall solar air heating systems eligible for credit under LEED CS EAc2?"" Background: The intent of the credit is to ""encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use."" ""Renewable Energy Systems Eligible for EA Credit 2"", ""Solar Thermal Systems"" (p. 224) states ""Active solar thermal energy systems that employ collection panels; heat transfer mechanical components such as pumps or fans, and a defined heat storage system, such as a hot water tank are eligible for this credit."" ""Systems Not Eligible for EA Credit 2"" (p. 224) states excludes ""architectural passive solar and daylighting strategies provide savings that are chiefly efficiency related"". Perforated metal wall solar air heating systems include a collector panel (the wall) and a heat transfer mechanical component (fan or fans) but typically do not include a defined thermal storage component. Natural Resources Canada considers these to be active systems (""Total energy savings result from four different mechanisms: [including] active solar heating of ventilation air"" http://www.canren.gc.ca/renew_ene/index.asp?CaID=50&PgID=347)" "The perforated metal wall solar air heating system described is considered an active system and therefore can contribute toward EA Credit 2. The applicant should note that there are no previously approved calculators for the amount of energy offset by such a system and therefore, the applicant must provide detailed calculations, including all assumptions and applicable weather data, during the review process. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5325" "2008-09-18" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Can a third party such as a utility company install and operate a Solar PV system on the rooftop of a LEED project, and can the owner achieve EA c2 credit (1%) and possibly an exemplary performance credit (5%) for Core and Shell V2.0 rating system? Intent of Credit: Encourage and recognize increasing levels of on-site renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce environmental and economic impacts associated with fossil fuel energy use. Approach: A new program has been initiated in the San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E)territory named Clean Energy Systems. The objective of this program is to find usable roof space (at least 5,000 sf)in high performance buildings such as this project where a Solar PV system can be installed, operated, and maintained by SDG&E. The impetus for this unique program is to use available secure roof top space to increase its renewable energy system portfolio that will help SDG&E get to its 20% overall renewable energy portfolio as required by California State Law. It would be the intent of SDG&E to sign a long-term lease space contract with the Owner of this project and install at least 5,000 sf of Solar PV array up on the roof of this and possibly the other two future buildings (Buildings B and C)in this core and shell complex. As mentioned previously, the motivation of SDG&E will be to grid-tie this renewable energy to assist them in achieving the 20% portfolio threshold. The motivation of the Owner is to achieve at least one and maybe two LEED points even though they will not necessarily be using electricity generated from the Solar PV system. The owner would sign a contract with SDG&E before this project is submitted via LEED Online sometime in the Fall of this year 2008. We would provide evidence to this plus an implementation schedule for installation of the system on at least Building A during design submittals. Confirmation of Credit Intent: We believe this approach does meet the intent of the credit providing renewable energy self-supply in order to reduce the environmental effects of fossil fuel consumption (aka global warming)while providing the developer with very needed LEED points in order to achieve LEED Silver for its Building A project. We also believe that this approach will be occurring more frequently in the near future with progressive utilities offering to lease roof space on LEED-registered buildings for independent Solar PV farms. Please verify that this approach summarized above does fulfill the intent of Credit EA c2." "The installation of on-site renewable energy sources owned and operated by an entity other than the building owner is allowable for achievement of EAc2 and has been addressed by a previous CIR dated 7/19/2007, provided the following conditions are met: [1] The renewable energy system must be installed within the boundaries of the project or on the project site. [2] The renewable energy system is connected immediately adjacent to the utility meter. [3] A 10-year (minimum) contract for on-site generation with the owner of the energy system must be established. [4] The Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) associated with the renewable energy system may not be sold. [5] The renewable energy system owner may not count the RECs associated with the renewable energy system to meet a mandated renewable portfolio standard goal or provide RECs to the project owner. The proposed renewable energy system does not appear to meet condition [5] since SDG&E is proposing the renewable energy system installation in order to meet a 20% renewable energy portfolio goal. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5721" "2007-06-15" "New Construction" "null" "Please see LEED Interpretation #1789" "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10389" "2014-07-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare, Commercial Interiors, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings, Existing Buildings - Recertification" "The project team is planning on installing a Cogeneration System that will take Biogas and turn it into Electricity to be used wholly on-site. The heat produced by this Cogeneration system will also fully be used on-site to preheat heating hot water and domestic hot water via a heat exchanger and potentially to power an absorption chiller.\n\nThe building will receive the Biogas from a local Biogas provider and plans to enter into at least a 10 year contract with this provider to supply enough Biogas to the building to fully power the planned Cogeneration system. The contract will stipulate both that enough Biogas will be fed into the pipeline to meet required demands of the Cogeneration system and that the Biogas will be metered to prove that the actual amount of Biogas supplied meets the contracted requirements at all times.\n\nThough the Biogas is not being piped exclusively to the site (contractually it is supplied exclusively via project ownership funds), it is transported directly to the site in the existing natural gas pipeline. This approach achieves the exact same net result on the Natural Gas grid as piping Biogas exclusively to the project site in its own dedicated pipeline and allows the project to avoid having to dig up 100s of miles of land and lay a brand new pipeline to the project, something that would have a significantly detrimental effect on the local environment. In an urban environment like where the project is located, there is little or no option to be able to refine and extract Biogas on-site or even very close to a site, so the approach the project team is suggesting is the best and most reasonable alternative.\n\nIs this approach acceptable in accordance with the Reference Guide and Addendum 100001081 (November 1, 2011)?" "Directed Biogas purchase is not considered on-site renewable energy based on the current EAc2 credit requirements, addenda and LEED Interpretations, because the gas consumed on-site is not the same as the biogas that the project purchased. Please note that the referenced Addendum 100001081 does not allow for the fuel used on site to be different than the fuel that was purchased for the project. The referenced addendum applies for situations such as landfill gas piped directly to the project from a nearby landfill, or wood pellets from wood mill residue that are trucked to the project. In either case, it would not be acceptable for the landfill gas or pellets generated from wood mill residue to be ""purchased"" by the project, used in another project, and replaced in the project with natural gas or wood pellets produced from tree tops. Also, note that NREL refers to directed biogas as off-site renewable energy." "10126, 100001081" "None" "X" "X"