Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "10059" "2011-05-09" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Does the described design for dealing with hazardous gas/chemicals in at a nail salon\'s manicure/pedicure workstation meet the requirements of this credit. " "Yes, as the project is implementing individual dedicated exhaust intake at each manicure/pedicure workstation the approach is acceptable. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10098" "2011-08-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare, Data centers - New Construction, Hospitality - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings, Schools - Existing Buildings, Retail - Existing Buildings" "Where there are physical impediments to locating 10 ft of walk-off mats inside the building, is it acceptable to locate a portion of the mat or grate outside and then the remainder of the required 10 ft inside?" "The intent for the entryway system (grilles, grates, walk-off mats) is to capture dirt and dust. An exception to the 10 ft length and/or indoor location is acceptable provided your alternative solution meets this intent and is thoroughly justified. Applicable Internationally." "5585, 5696" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10252" "2012-10-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare, Commercial Interiors, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "Carpet tile is not currently considered an acceptable entryway system. One reason carpet tile is not accepted is because it cannot be cleaned underneath and therefore does not meet the performance of mechanical systems (such as grates/grilles), or roll-out mats. Carpet tile is a highly desired material for walk off areas due to its ease of maintenance as compared to mechanical systems, avoidance of trip hazards associated with roll-out mats, and numerous other factors. The ability to clean underneath carpet tile is not necessary. Carpet tile creates a sealed floor where dirt and moisture do not penetrate the seams. Though not specifically required by the rating system, the reference guide provides suggestions for optimal performance attributes for entryway systems. The carpet tile product we are suggesting meets the performance-related attributes as follows: \nCapture particles & prevent interior contamination- the carpet tile product is specifically designed to withstand heavy traffic at entranceways. Captures and hides soil, requires minimal maintenance and helps prevent slips and falls. Extend 10 feet: the carpet tile will extend 15\' into the interior from the exterior entrance and 40\' in left-right directions along the building lobby. Solid backings & appropriate for climate- the carpet tile backing is stable even under extreme changes in temperature and humidity. It will not move, create gaps, or curl up over time. High-void-volume & high fiber height- the carpet tile is produced with needlepunch hair-like face fibers with pile height of 0.165 in. Electrostatic propensity- the electrostatic propensity level is less than 2.5 kV. Weekly cleaning - the walk-off system will be maintained by the in-house school maintenance staff. The tiles are vacuumed daily and spot cleaned with appropriate environmentally-preferable cleaning products as needed. If an individual tile is deemed to be damaged beyond repair, it is simply removed and immediately replaced with a new identical tile. \n \nHow can we demonstrate that carpet tile is an equally performing or better solution for entryway systems?" "The applicant is requesting confirmation that carpet tiles may be used as acceptable entryway systems. Yes, carpet tiles with similar attributes to the product described are acceptable entryway systems.Conventional carpet is not acceptable, the carpet tile must be specifically designed for entryway system or similar use, have performance attributes equivalent to other acceptable entryway systems, and must be regularly maintained. Applicable Internationally. \n\n***Updated 01/012013 to add applicability for LEED 2009 for Healthcare and to remove the text ""(such as high pile height)""." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1627" "2006-12-02" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "The project is 70-unit condo building with high efficient residential split systems. Natural ventilation is provided to the condo units via operable windows, and mechanical ventilation is provided to the corridors via two commercial rooftop units. The third part of the requirement for EQ 5 requires MERV 13 or better filtration on all building HVAC systems serving regularly occupied spaces. The residential split system equipment cannot physically handle the MERV 13 filters due to filter size and increased air pressure drop across the filter. The corridor supply units, which are commercial grade, can and will be provided with MERV 13 filters. The project design will also meet both of the other requirements for this credit for the entryway systems and chemical and pollutant exhaust and control. We have reviewed LEED NC v2.1 and the LEED for Homes program for their Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control credits. LEED NC 2.1 EQ5 did not have any filtration requirements and therefore no CIR\'s to review to determine options for the residential split systems. The LEED for Homes scoring system breaks the Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control into two separate credits: IEQ7 Supply Air Filtering and IEQ8 Contaminant Control. The filtration requirements are fully covered under IEQ7 which provides a mandatory requirement of installing MERV 8 filtration and MERV 10 filtration to obtain one point. We also reviewed the 2004 ASHRAE Handbook, HVAC Systems and Equipment, Chapter 24, Table 3, which lists the various MERV filtration levels and typical applications and limitations. MERV 1 - 4 provide minimum filtration levels for residential. MERV 5 - 8 are filtration levels for typical commercial buildings and better residential. MERV 9 - 12 are filtration levels for Superior residential and better commercial buildings along with hospital laboratories. MERV 13 - 16 are filtration levels for Superior commercial buildings, general surgery and hospital inpatient care. These levels demonstrate that the MERV 13 is geared toward a commercial building and not realistic, nor feasible, as a requirement for residential DX split systems to achieve this credit. Based on ASHRAE Handbook\'s tables and listings, and the LEED for Homes requirements, we propose to meet this credit by providing MERV 10 filters on all residential split systems and MERV 13 filters on the commercial rooftops serving the corridors. These filtration levels are providing the best filtration levels that the systems can accommodate and mitigating the amount of contaminants that occupants are exposed to. We feel that our proposed modification follows the intent of the credit while adapting it to a practical, and still superior, use for a residential application." "LEED for Homes does not apply to high rise residential and commercial condos, and since this project is registered under LEED-NC, the credit requirements for NC need to be met. As per LEED-NC, MERV 13 is required to meet this credit." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1795" "2007-08-08" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our project is a 7 story 163,000 sq. ft. laboratory/vivarium building that is mechanically ventilated with MERV 13 filtration for all air handling units serving the building. Among various other programmed areas, the building has 21 zones of open laboratory spaces that are being MERV 13 filtered, heated, and cooled by the laboratory air handling unit system. To minimize the excessive requirements of outside air into the building for these labs, supplemental recirculated fan coil units are being provided for these 21 zones. The systems (at minimum load conditions) start out by ventilating these labs with 6 ACH (air changes per hour). Upon an increase in load, the VAV (variable air volume) air system will increase the ventilation to these zones to a maximum condition that corresponds to 12 ACH. Upon further need for cooling (based on excessive summer heat through the exterior glazing to these zones), there are 21 individual fan coil units that provide additional cooling to these spaces to satisfy the local temperature sensors. The 12 ACH still comes from the MERV 13 filtered air handling unit systems but the fan coil units are only MERV 8 filtered. The intent for these supplemental systems was to minimize the energy consumption for these transient conditions by not utilizing additional outside air. Since these units fully recirculate their air flows from within these 21 laboratory zones and only activate upon excessive cooling conditions to supplement the flows from the MERV 13 air handling units, does this ventilation scheme meet the intent of EQ credit 5: Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control?" "The CIR inquiry indicates that the project receives 100% of its outside air through air handling units that are equipped with MERV 13 filtration, as required by EQc5. Additional fan coil units equipped with MERV 8 filters are located within the building to provide supplemental cooling for 21 zones during maximum load conditions. The supplemental fan coil units supply air is made up of a mixture of filtered outside air from the air handling units that are equipped with MERV 13 filters and from recirculated air within the conditioned zones. Since the fan coil units recirculate room air, they must have MERV 13 filters. Therefore, the design, as described, does not appear to meet the intent of the credit. NOTE: UPDATED CREDIT LANGUAGE FOR 2009 STATES THAT ""PARTICLE FILTERS OF AIR CLEANING DEVICES SHALL BE PROVIDED TO CLEAN THE OUTDOOR AIR AT ANY LOCATION PRIOR TO ITS INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPIED SPACES"". REQUIREMENT FOR FILTRATION ON RETURN AIR IS NO LONGER APPLICABLE TO ANY VERSION OF ANY RATING SYSTEM." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1839" "2007-10-18" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "The project is an interior fit-up of 16,948 sf within a 410,357 sf building, or approximately 4% of the building\'s total sf. The building, a 1950\'s era building, was renovated in the 1990\'s, with a mechanical system consisting of 4 built-up air handlers for the building. This credit consists of 4 requirements; entryways, exhausting of air, containment drains and MERV 13 filters. The first 3 requirements are appropriate for any tenant space and reasonable cost, but the fourth requirement, requiring all air to be filtered with MERV 13 filters, would require replacement of major components of the existing AHU\'s, and is financially beyond the capability of this tenant project or any small tenant. The requirement for MERV 13 filters appears to be appropriate only for tenants relocating to LEED CS projects or large tenants occupying more than 50% of a building. Proposed Solution: The project team believes that the objective of this credit can only be obtained by tenants that rent in excess of 75% of a building and become a major stakeholder in the building. Other credits within LEED-CI make distinctions between tenants renting less than 75% and more than 75% of a building. And LEED-EB actually makes a disconnect between the first 3 requirements and the MERV 13 requirement in CI Credit EQ 5, with EB Credit EQ 5.1 - Reduce Particulates in Air Distribution and EB Credit EQ 5.2 - Isolation of High Volume Coping/Print Rooms/Fax Stations. The tenant has been conducting Indoor Air Quality Testing on their numerous facilities and the preliminary findings are indicating the importance of ventilating the High Volume Print Areas because of VOC\'s and particulates. The particulates in the office spaces tend to spike after hours when the air handlers are either shut down by the Building Owner. It appears to be more appropriate to remove the particulates before they enter the indoor air. They have also found that percentage of particulates are just as high in their naturally ventilated office spaces, as they are in their mechanically ventilated spaces (The tenant occupies both the naturally ventilated space and the mechanically ventilated spaces). The project team believes that a distinction of project size should be made for this credit, whereas any tenant occupying less than 75% of the building be required to obtain the first 3 requirements of this credit (entryway systems, exhausting of air to outside, containment drains) and any tenant occupying over 50% to obtain all of the requirements, including the MERV 13 requirement. In fact it appears that naturally ventilated spaces are exempt for this requirement, because there is no way to remove particulates. The cost of ventilating the High Volume Copy spaces can be expensive, but will eliminate the VOC\'s generated by the equipment. It will also rid the space of the particulates before they need to be contained by the MERV 13 filters or any filter media. We believe that it is important in making a distinction between large and small tenants for this credit and would be beneficial to small projects, because it is would make this credit obtainable. LEED CI should produce better indoor environments and therefore we believe that this refinement would enhance LEED-CI. The only other option available to a small tenant would be to provide plenum installed mechanical air filters with MERV 13 filter material, but this would be independent of the mechanical system. Our concern with this is method, is cost, determining the appropriate number of air returns per hour and the additional energy needed to power the fans and filters. Also the existing AHU\'s would continue to dump the rest of the buildings particulates into the tenant space." "The Credit Interpretation Request asks that for situations where a LEED-CI applicant occupies less than 75% of a building\'s gross square footage that the CI submittal be exempt from the MERV-13 filter part of the credit requirements. While it is recognized that the MERV-13 requirement can be onerous, particularly in the described situation, meeting only the first three parts of the credit requirements (entryway mats, exhausting of air, containment drains) does not ensure that the credit intent is met. Installation of MERV-13 filters is required for credit achievement." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1926" "2007-11-13" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our project is a high-density residential tower combined with single-family street level private entry brownstones. The brownstones are less than 5% of the total unit mix for the project. All requirements of EQc5 have been able to be achieved through out the project with one notable exception. The single family brownstones units have been unable to comply with the permanent entryway system at least six feet in length in the primary direction of travel Previous CIRS confirm that some form of entry way system is required, with no exceptions, for all entry ways from exterior spaces into residential units. Walk off mats have been considered by the developer in lieu of the permanent grills or grates; however, since each brownstone unit will be sold, not rented, it is not legally possible through CC&Rs to require each brownstone owner to grant access to a matt cleaning service on a weekly basis for a 2 year term. In the interest of meeting the intent of credit, we propose that the developer provide two washable walk off mats as part of the amenities provided with each unit (each brownstone has its own has it\'s own private point of entry from a public street or parking garage). The Owner\'s User Manual shall include instructions on how each owner can and should regularly wash their entry mats in an effort to reduce/prevent dirt and particulates from entering their unit. The building concierge will also offer a mat cleaning service to tenants that will be covered by HOA dues. The mats will be custom fit and a design selected that allows particulate matter to be trapped but also has an aesthetic that matches the design style of the brownstones. We also propose that since these brownstone units are single family, that the developer is not required to provide ""at least 6\' in the primary direction of travel"" as there is already precedent for this in LEED for Homes IEQc8.0 Contaminant Control which states that "".walk-off mats.are at least 4 feet in length."" Please confirm if this alternative compliance will be acceptable for all private entries to single family units entryways that are directly connected to the outdoors, and if not, what would be an acceptable solution that acknowledges the limits of CC&Rs." "The alternative compliance path is not acceptable. The CIR asks whether 4\' long walk-off mats can be placed at all exterior entrances to a single family (brownstone) home to fulfill credit requirements within a mixed-use submittal. LEED-NC v2.2 allows for minimum 6\' long walk-off mats (when maintained on a weekly basis by a contracted service organization) as a compliance path for commercial buildings, however LEED for Homes (v1.11a, January 2007, available as a free download during the Pilot phase from the USGBC website) requires that project teams, ""Design and install permanent walk-off mats at each entry that are at least 4 feet in length and allow accessibility for cleaning (e.g. grating with catch basin.)"" Single family homes, as part of a mixed-use LEED-NC submittal, should pursue either the compliance path established in the LEED-NC Reference Guide (excluding compliance paths and CIRs developed for non-single family home applications) or the LEED for Homes compliance path in effect at the time of LEED submittal.\n\nPlease see updated guidance for this LEED Interpretation under a LEED Interpretation Ruling 10098 posted date 8/01/2011. Projects registered on or after this date must use the new ruling." "5585" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1938" "2008-01-07" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "On the 2nd floor of our building (62,000 sf), there are 10 multi-function copy/printer machines shared by approximately 350 employees. The machines are scattered across the floor plan with no more than two machines adjacent to each other. Does this equipment meet the criteria to be considered convenience copier/printer?" "he LEED Reference Guide notes that ""convenience"" copiers and printers are acceptable within occupied spaces, provided they are not used for high volume printing or copying (more than 40,000 pages (20,000 double-sided) per month). In your submittal, provide information on the size and amount of copies produced by the machines, and explain how the project design meets the intent of the credit. Include any information on how high volume printing or copying jobs are handled, for example by printing to larger machines located in separately ventilated areas or by outsourcing larger projects. It is recommended that the project consider the intent of the credit to ""avoid exposure of building occupants to potentially hazardous chemicals that adversely impact air quality"" when selecting the equipment, estimating the equipment\'s usage and designing the spaces. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2021" "2008-01-29" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "The building in question will be a 200,000 square feet warehouse with a 300 square feet office space. The warehouse space will be used for storage of goods and materials that will be transported to an adjacent facility (within 1/8 of a mile) for use in product manufacturing. The employees of the warehouse facility will spend a majority of their day within the office space except for the occasional need to go out into the warehouse space to receive and stock incoming shipments, or transition of these goods and materials to the adjacent facility. The layout of the warehouse space will consist of long rows of aligned storage racks and shelving - with intermediate aisles and end aisles that would be parallel with the exterior walls of the building. One side of the building will have freight car (rail) access as well as tractor-trailer access with overhead doors. As such, is the entire warehouse space considered ""regularly occupied"" space? If so, would we be required to provide ""pollutant control"" system for fork trucks moving goods and materials in and out of the freight cars and tractor-trailers? If so, would permanently installed grill or grate systems (for the fork trucks) aligned with these transition points fulfill the requirements of this credit? If the warehouse space is not considered ""regularly occupied"" space would we only be required to meet the needs of the office space? Please provide some guidance on a strategy that would be consistent with the intent of this credit." "At a minimum, you should provide entryway grates/grilles at all regular entry points for the building users, covering both the warehouse and office space. The same entryway system requirement would not apply directly to the fork truck operations; however, to be consistent with the credit intent, you should describe the measures included in the design to minimize pollutant entry into the building from these vehicles.\n\n **Updated on October 1, 2013 to clarify the entryway system requirement and to align the ruling with LI 5177.\n The project team is requesting clarification on the entryway system requirements for a warehouse space. The exterior entrances to loading docks and garages are not required to have entryway systems. Regularly used entrances from these areas into adjacent spaces in the building (typically office areas of the building) must have entryway systems." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2045" "2008-02-12" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "Our question regards the filtration requirement for re-circulating air systems, such as VAV terminals and fan coil units, under EQc5. Per LI 5061 and LI 1795 rulings, ""Since the fan coil units re-circulate room air, they must have MERV 13 filters"", so do the VAV terminal units that re-circulate air. This conflicts with our previous understanding that the MERV13 requirement would only apply to the air handling units supplying 100% outside air - or a mix of outside and return air - to a single or several rooms. The use of MERV 13 filters is justified when HVAC systems re-circulate a part of return air - e.g. mixed return air streams from various rooms - back to different spaces. In this configuration, supply ducts of the HVAC system and return air may become contaminated by re-circulated indoor-generated pollutants. Thus, contamination generated at specific indoor locations may be spread throughout the building unless properly filtered. However, the use of MERV 13 filters cannot be justified where air is re-circulated within the room. In this configuration, there is no possibility of cross-contamination: the re-circulated air has been conditioned and returned to the same room. In general, re-circulating air units (fan coils.) are provided with MERV 6 to MERV 8 filters. Using MERV 13 would substantially increase the energy consumption to condition a space without significantly improving the indoor air quality within the space. Imposing such a requirement would also cause most commercial systems to be ineligible for achievement of this credit, and may cause the other beneficial aspects of this credit (walk-off mats and isolation of harmful contaminants) not to be incorporated. Please clarify whether MERV 13 filtration is necessary for air re-circulated within a space." "**Updated January 1, 2014\n As noted in LI 5061 and LI 1795 rulings, both outside air and re-circulated air must pass through MERV-13 filtration before being introduced into a space, even if the re-circulated air is only being returned to the space it was drawn from. If there is a source of contamination in a space, filtering the re-circulated air before re-introducing it into the space provides a more rapid method of removing the contaminants than relying on the introduction of filtered outside air alone. NOTE: UPDATED CREDIT LANGUAGE FOR 2009 STATES THAT ""PARTICLE FILTERS OF AIR CLEANING DEVICES SHALL BE PROVIDED TO CLEAN THE OUTDOOR AIR AT ANY LOCATION PRIOR TO ITS INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPIED SPACES"". REQUIREMENT FOR FILTRATION ON RETURN AIR IS NO LONGER APPLICABLE TO ANY VERSION OR ANY RATING SYSTEM. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2130" "2008-06-25" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our project wishes to achieve the requirements of this credit by purchasing roll-up walk-off mats and using internal maintenance staff to clean them on a weekly basis instead of hiring an outside contracted service organization. The internal staff are permanent employees of the organization not a contracted cleaning service. Staff is on-site everyday to complete regular maintenance tasks as well as respond to specific needs as they arise. Completing their job responsibilities accurately and completely guarantees their employment; much like fulfillment of contractual requirements ensures that an outside company is paid, job completion ensures that the staff are paid for their time and service. In order to ensure that the internal staff are aware of their responsibilities and ensure completion of this task on a weekly basis the following documentation would be supplied in place of a 2-year contract: - Achieve all requirements for an Innovation in Design award for implementation of a Green Housekeeping Plan as accepted in other CIRs. - A copy of the Green Housekeeping Plan including weekly requirements for cleaning entrance mats and replacement as necessary. - Signed Acknowledgment from all maintenance staff that they have read, understand and will comply with the Green Housekeeping Plan. - A copy of maintenance staff job descriptions stating compliance with the Green Housekeeping Plan and LEED required maintenance. In the case of existing employees, job descriptions will be updated or addenda issued. - Signed Letter of Commitment from the Owner stating their commitment to ensuring maintenance practices are completed as required by the Green Housekeeping Plan and will be included in the job descriptions and facility operations for a period of no less than 2 years. Requiring an additional contract when in-house staff are capable of this cleaning task and held responsible for their actions puts a financial burden on this non-profit as well as increasing pollution due to vehicle traffic associated with unnecessary visits to the facility. We believe this approach meets the intent of credit and we are providing the equivalence of the contractual cleaning requirements with a service organization. Of course, all other requirements for this credit will be met. Please advise." "The described approach for meeting the requirements for weekly cleaning of roll-up walk-off mats by internal maintenance staff, in lieu of an outside contracted service, is acceptable. Please also ensure that there are entryway systems at all qualifying entry points to the building. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2134" "2008-06-09" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our project is a Graduate University located in Saudi Arabia dedicated to the research of alternative fuels and renewable energy. The entire campus will be New Construction and will consist of research labs, lab support areas, administration buildings, a library, a commons building, food service, an auditorium, conference rooms, lecture halls, offices and public areas. The project is seeking interpretation for the MERV 13 filtration media requirement in regularly occupied spaces. Some spaces in buildings with underfloor air systems are served by fan powered VAV boxes. The fan powered VAV boxes are used in underfloor air pressurized plenum applications where all air supplied under the floor is filtered by MERV 13 or 14 filters. The Air Handling Units supplying the underfloor plenums contain MERV 13 or 14 filtration media. The fan powered VAV boxes contain MERV 6 filtration media. Since the VAV units do not re-circulate room air, the design team is seeking confirmation that MERV 6 filtration media on the VAV boxes will meet the intent of the Credit. The project design will meet both of the other requirements of this Credit. Please advise if this design meets the requirements of the Credit." "The CIR is inquiring if fan powered VAV boxes, used in conjunction with an underfloor air system, are required to use MERV 13 filtration media. If 100% of the air being supplied to the VAV boxes is filtered by MERV 13 media prior to reaching the box, MERV 13 filters are not required at the individual VAV boxes. Applicable Internationally; Saudi Arabia." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2155" "2008-07-02" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "This proposal requests confirmation and approval of an alternate walk-off mat compliance method. We request 1) confirmation if an access point into a hotel accommodation serving 12 people or less constitutes a ""high traffic exterior access point,"" would require a walk-off mat; and, 2) if walk-off mats are required in the ""low traffic access areas,"" we request approval of walk-off mats that are less than 6 feet long in the direction of travel due to the constraint of existing historic building porch depths and building footprints. The project is complying with the all three requirements under this credit: all areas where hazardous chemicals may be present are being exhausted at a rate of at least 0.50 cfm/SF and all of the rooms have hard lid ceilings; MERV 13 filters are installed on all mechanically ventilated systems; and, walk-off mats are being employed in all primary entryways to all regularly occupied buildings. The project is a multiple buildings submission and includes rehabilitation of 21 historic buildings being adaptively reused as a hotel and conference center, and construction of 14 new buildings on existing non-historic building footprints. Four of the 21 historic buildings and one of the new buildings are major publicly used buildings used for lobby/registration, offices, conference rooms, a commercial kitchen, a bar/restaurant, banquet facilities, and day spa facilities. The main entrance of each historic building is located at the building\'s front porch. These porches are deep enough to accommodate 6\' long walk-off mats and will employ a 6\' long mat. These are considered ""high traffic areas."" Thirteen of the 21 historic buildings that were originally officer\'s housing are being converted to guest lodging. The main entrance of each building is located at the building\'s front porch. The porches are less than 6\'-0"" deep and can accommodate a mat that is 3\'-6"" to 4\'-0"" deep without creating a trip hazard. Some lodging buildings have 1 to 2 units (so a total occupant load of 2 to 4 people), and others will accommodate between 8 and 12 occupants from a single point of entry. Thirteen of the 14 new buildings were constructed to accommodate additional lodging units. The project\'s Environmental Impact Statement limited new construction footprints to the existing footprint of the demolished non-historic housing. Each lodging unit has a separate entry and will accommodate between 1-4 people. At new lodging, the constraints of reusing pre-existing building footprints/pads limited unit entries to approx 4\' deep and as such, the LEED walk-off mat length requirements at new lodging entries can not be achieved. All mats sitewide will be maintained on a daily basis. This is an exemplary practice that goes beyond the weekly maintenance requirement of LEED. As the intent of this credit is to reduce the amount of contaminant from being tracked into the space, the use pattern of stopping to open the door with the room key is a practice that presumably removes much more contaminant than merely walking over a mat in an office setting, thus daily maintenance of a slightly shorter mat may likely be more effective than weekly maintenance of a 6\' mat. This credit requires walk-off mats at ""high traffic exterior access points"". Please confirm if an access point into a hotel accommodation serving 12 people or less constitutes a ""high traffic exterior access point"" and requires a walk-off mat. And if they are required, we request approval of the use of walk-off mats that are less than 6 feet long in the direction of travel due to the constraint of existing historic building porch depths and building footprints." "The applicant is enquiring 1) whether an access point into a hotel accommodation serving 12 people or less is considered a ""high traffic exterior access point”. This issue has been addressed in numerous LEED-NC v2.1 CIRs. Please see CIR ruling 4/4/2005 & 12/21/2004 which state that, “In evaluating the requirements of this credit, you should focus on the frequency of use of each building entry point rather than the percentage of building occupants served. Hence, any door that is intended to be used regularly and frequently by building occupants should be considered high volume for the purposes of this credit."" Therefore, the access point into a hotel accommodation as described by the applicant would require walk of mats. The applicant is further enquiring 2) If walk off mats are required in their case, then due to the historic nature of the project, they be allowed to use walk off mats shorter than 6 feet in the primary direction of travel which would be maintained daily. As noted in 1) walk of mats would be required at the access points of the lodging units. However, due to historic constraints and the residential nature of the lodging units, the use of walk of mats which are 4 feet deep in this particular case does meet the intent of the credit. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2221" "2008-07-02" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our high rise residential project currently has: Grates 3\'-0"" wide in the direction of travel outside of the ground floor entrances Structured parking with a dedicated (not combined with return air) exhaust system. Maintenance room to house chemicals with walls to deck, closers on both leaves of a pair of doors, as well as a dedicated (not combined with return air) exhaust system exhausting into the structured parking. Pool equipment room to house chemicals with walls to concrete mechanical platform above to access exhaust fans for the structured parking, and closers on both leaves of a pair of doors. MERV 13 filter to be installed prior to occupancy on HVAC units serving regularly occupied spaces. The following are additions/modification or questions regarding EQc5 requirements: 3\'-0"" wide in the direction of travel roll-out mats (2 year min maintenance by contracted service organization) are to be placed inside the building at the areas of the 3\'-0"" wide in the direction of travel grates at the ground floor entrances for a 6\'-0"" total permanent entryway system. Or is a 6\'-0"" wide in the direction of travel mat inside required? Roll-out mats (2 year min maintenance by contracted service organization) to be placed at all doors from structured parking to elevator lobbies, and from the pool deck to the elevator lobby. 6\'-0"" wide in the direction of travel mat will be installed where the 6\'-0"" does not encroach on vehicle circulation. A 3\'-0"" wide in the direction of travel mat will be installed outside and inside the elevator lobby where vehicle circulation is within the 6\'-0"". Or is a 6\'-0"" wide in the direction of travel mat inside the elevator lobby a better solution? The custodian must pass through the maintenance room to access the custodian office and custodian toilet room. Do the doors to the custodian office and toilet room require closers? The pool equipment room with have a dedicated (not combined with return air) exhaust system exhausting into the structured parking will be installed in it. Will the project as designed along with the proposed additions/modification meet the requirements of EQc5?" "Can a 3\'0 (in the direction of travel) grate or mat on the outside of all regularly used entry points be combined with a 3\'0 (in the direction of travel) walk-off mat on the interior to meet the required 6\'0 minimum entryway system? Yes, grates and walk-off mats combined are likely to provide superior dirt entrapment than a walk-off mat alone. Please bear in mind that 6\'0 in the direction of travel is the minimum length to meet credit requirements. Many commercial buildings may combine a grate with two different coarsenesses of mats for 30 feet or more to minimize exposure to potentially hazardous particulates. All entryway systems must meet LEED requirements as detailed in the Reference Guide and applicable CIRs. Are rooms adjoining a chemical use/storage area required to have closers on them? Yes, the intent of this credit is to, ""Minimize exposure of building occupants to potentially hazardous particulates and chemical pollutants,"" as such a chemical use/storage area must be isolated to protect the occupant/s of the custodian\'s office and toilet from the adjacent storage area. It is not clear from the provided description as to whether exhausting the pool equipment room into the structured parking may pose a health hazard, particularly in the event of a chemical spill." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2223" "2008-08-13" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Chilled Beams & Re-circulated Air The project is a 6-story new consolidated forensic laboratory facility of approximately 351,000 square feet with approximately 140,000 square feet of laboratory space and the remainder typical office space. The office space and much of the lab spaces in the building will be tempered by active chilled beams. The remainder of the lab spaces with heavy equipment loads or special requirements will be served with fan coil units that will all be equipped with MERV 13 filters. Active chilled beams are located in or directly above the conditioned spaces. They utilize ventilation air that flows through the beam. The ventilation air passes through small air nozzles which induces room air through the cooling coil in the beam and provides overhead ventilation and sensible only cooling. This technology reduces energy and the architectural impact of ductwork and mechanical systems. Finally this cooler air will fall to the floor. Once the air heats up, it will rise back to the beam to be cooled again through the natural process of convection. The ventilation air supplied to the space through the beams will be single-pass, 100% outside air and will pass through MERV 14 filters at the air handling units before passing through the chilled beams. However, the project team is concerned that the natural process of convection utilized by this system may conflict with earlier Credit Interpretation Rulings (02/12/08, 08/13/2007, 08/08/2007) that state re-circulated air inside a single space must pass through MERV 13 filters. The nature of the system prevents filtration within the beams. The project team would like clarification if air re-circulated by chilled beams is held to the same filtration standards as a forced air system if the ventilation air provided to the chilled beams is single-pass and has already passed through MERV 14 filters?" "The proposed HVAC system design mixes 100% outside air from an air handling unit equipped with a MERV 14 filter with re-circulated, un-filtered air from the conditioned space. This request has been addressed by previous CIRs dated 2/12/2008, 8/13/2007, and 8/8/2007. The LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide states that filtration using a MERV of 13 or better must be applied to process both return and outside air that is to be delivered as supply air. Therefore, the system as described does not meet the credit requirements. NOTE: UPDATED CREDIT LANGUAGE FOR 2009 STATES THAT ""PARTICLE FILTERS OF AIR CLEANING DEVICES SHALL BE PROVIDED TO CLEAN THE OUTDOOR AIR AT ANY LOCATION PRIOR TO ITS INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPIED SPACES"". REQUIREMENT FOR FILTRATION ON RETURN AIR IS NO LONGER APPLICABLE TO ANY VERSION OF ANY RATING SYSTEM. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2366" "2008-10-08" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our project is a Graduate University located in Saudi Arabia dedicated to the research of alternative fuels and renewable energy. The entire campus will be New Construction and will consist of research labs, lab support areas, administration buildings, a library, a commons building, food service, an auditorium, conference rooms, lecture halls, offices and public areas. The project is seeking interpretation for the MERV 13 filtration media requirement in regularly occupied spaces. Some spaces will be utilizing Active Chilled Beams as an Energy Conservation Strategy. The Air Handling Units supplying the space with the active chilled beams contain MERV 13 or 14 filtration media. The Active Chilled Beams induce room air in these spaces and provide highly efficient cooling for the space. This active chilled beam induced room air is not filtered by MERV 13 media because MERV 13 media is not available for the active chilled beam apparatus. To reference a CIR ruling dated 8/13/07, ""Since the fan coil units re-circulate room air, they must have MERV 13 filters, which are available on the market."" The MERV 13 filters for the active chilled beams are not available on the market. The design team would like an exemption for this requirement because the MERV 13 filters for the active chilled beams are currently not available on the market. The design team feels that the implementation of energy saving active chilled beams, despite the lack of availability of MERV 13 filters, is imperative to help achieve the overall energy reduction goals of the project. The project design will meet both of the other requirements of this Credit and believes that the design should be exempt from the filtration requirements." "Based on LEED-NC v2.2 EQc5 CIR ruling dated 8/13/2008, the system as described does not meet the requirements of the credit. NOTE: UPDATED CREDIT LANGUAGE FOR 2009 STATES THAT ""PARTICLE FILTERS OF AIR CLEANING DEVICES SHALL BE PROVIDED TO CLEAN THE OUTDOOR AIR AT ANY LOCATION PRIOR TO ITS INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPIED SPACES"". REQUIREMENT FOR FILTRATION ON RETURN AIR IS NO LONGER APPLICABLE TO ANY VERSION OF ANY RATING SYSTEM. Applicable Internationally; Saudi Arabia. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2406" "2009-02-20" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "This CIR is in reference to the ventilation design of the 2 level underground parking garage (16,070 m2 / 172975 sq.ft) in an high-rise office building and its compliance with the requirements of Credit EQc5. The project is located in Frankfurt/Main, Germany. The exhaust fans of the parking garage are demand-controlled, depending on the CO content in the garage and start operating when the CO content exceeds the following levels: - Level 1: CO content > 30ppm => 4 m3/m2*h (0.22 cfm/sq.ft) - Level 2: CO content > 50ppm => 8 m3/m2*h (0.44 cfm/sq.ft) - Level 3: CO content > 80ppm => 16 m3/m2*h (0.88 cfm/sq.ft) If the CO content exceeds 80ppm, an alarm will sound and signs require drivers to turn off their cars immediately. In addition to the exhaust fans of the parking garage, jet fans are installed throughout the parking garage to ensure the efficient ventilation of the garage. They are operated locally, depending on where the CO content exceeds the threshold. The garage is directly exhausted to the outside without recirculation. The required pressure difference to adjacent spaces (aver. 5Pa / min. 1Pa) can be achieved in all Levels with the exhaust rate as specified above. The rooms connected to the garage will have a positive pressure, to ensure the required pressure difference between the garage and adjacent rooms when the exhaust fans of the garage are not operating. Additionally, all of the stair cases and elevator rooms are separated by a vestibule from the garage to prevent the entry of pollutants into the building. The CO content read out is averaged over a period of 15 minutes. In total appr. 45 CO measuring devices will be installed in the 16,070 m2 parking garage at a height of 1.5m. As required by LEED, all rooms connected to the parking garage are equipped with self closing doors and deck to deck partitions. MERV 13 filter are installed in the air supply system to regularly occupied spaces and permanent entryway systems are installed in all entryways. Outside air and return air from offices and storage rooms is provided as supply air to the garage. Despite the fact that the exhaust rate is not as required by LEED at least 0.5 cfm/sq.ft., the project team believes that the intent to minimize exposure of building occupants to potentially hazardous gases from the garage is fulfilled, due to the following measures: a. It is assured that the CO content does not reach harmful levels, due to the demand controlled ventilation system. b. The thresholds, as described above, are very strict, e.g. the New York City Building Code, Title 27 / Subchapter 7 specifies: "". max. average concentration of 100ppm for periods longer than 1 hour and with a maximum concentration at any time of 400ppm"". c. Local jet fans provide an immediate improvement of the air quality by diluting the CO content locally. d. Vestibules with doors on each side separate the garage from the hallways leading to the stair cases and elevators. e. Hallways leading to the stair cases and elevators and a small number of storage rooms will be provided with positive pressure in relation to the garage. Please advice if the projects teams suggested approach for the ventilation of the parking garage is acceptable for the USGBC to fulfill the requirements of this credit." "The proposed strategy appears to satisfy the requirements of the credit, as well as EQ prerequisite 1. The project is using a demand control ventilation strategy that is capable of providing a maximum exhaust flowrate of 0.88 cfm/sf, which is significantly greater than the 0.5 cfm/sf requirement in the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide, and greater than the 0.75 cfm/sf requirement in ASHRAE Standard 62.1. The project team is not required to provide a constant 0.5 cfm/sf exhaust rate, if demand control strategies with sufficient sensors and controls capable of maintaining acceptable carbon monoxide concentration set points have been provided. The proposed carbon monoxide set points, however, are too high. The sensors need to be distributed throughout the garage, including those places with the highest anticipated vehicular traffic and the lowest exhaust ventilation rate, and the controls set to maintain a maximum carbon monoxide concentration of 20 ppm at each sensor location. In addition, an audible alarm must be activated should the concentration of carbon monoxide at any sensor location exceed 35 ppm. These carbon monoxide concentrations are to be the instantaneous concentration or the average over no more than one minute. (This assumes that this project site is not a high altitude location (i.e. more than 4,500 feet above sea level). For high altitude locations the set points for carbon monoxide must be reduced to 13 ppm with an alarm point at 23 ppm to account for the reduced mass concentration of oxygen at these altitudes.) The project team has also demonstrated that the pressurization requirements can be met on a continuous basis. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2455" "2009-02-10" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Background: Part of our project is a small pavilion building with a plan dimension of 45\' x 55.5\' that will function as a small cafeteria/ banquet space as a supplement to two adjacent high-rise towers. This pavilion space has a total 6 pairs of exterior swing doors and one revolving door. The revolving door will function as the main entry into the pavilion. Visitors will be encouraged to use the main entrance - the revolving door - to enter the pavilion. The revolving door is 6\'-0"" in diameter with a permanent walk-off installed within the diameter of the revolving door enclosure. Two of the six pairs of doors will also function as side entrances. Both of these pairs of doors will have 6\'-0"" walk-off mats inside the pavilion. The four remaining pairs of doors are intended for natural ventilation only. The arrangement of loose furniture will discourage the use of these doors as entrances. These remaining pairs of doors will not have walk-off mats. Credit Interpretation Request: It is the design team\'s interpretation that the walk-off mats are required only at the main entrance (the revolving door) and at the two side entrances. The arrangement of loose furniture will discourage the use of these remaining four pairs of exterior doors as entrances and therefore walk-off mats are not required at these doors. It is also the design team\'s interpretation that since the revolving door is 6\'-0"" in diameter, it would only be necessary to provide the walk-off mat within the diameter of revolving door enclosure. Please confirm that design team\'s interpretation is correct." "The applicants are inquiring as to 1) if the 4 remaining doors qualify as main entrances and are required to provide 6\' walk-off mats in the direction of travel, and 2) Since the revolving door is 6\'-0"" in diameter, is it acceptable to only provide the walk-off mat within the diameter of the revolving door enclosure. 1) Past CIR rulings on 7/2/2008 determine that ""you should focus on the frequency of use of each building entry point rather than the percentage of building occupants served."" If design measures are being taken to distinguish between a high-volume main entrance and create low-volume, secondary entrances for building users, then the low-volume entrances would not require walk-off mats. However, the design solution to create the secondary entrances must also demonstrate that the low-volume design will be permanent. 2) The LEED-CS reference guide states that the permanent entryway systems must be ""at least 6 feet long in the primary direction of travel"". As the direction of travel will not be a direct path, but will be based on the circumference of the door frame which will result a direction of travel over the entryway that is greater than 6\'-0, the revolving door meets the credit intent. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2481" "2009-04-08" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "This project building is a Class A multi-tenant office building, 37 stories tall and is over 400,000 square feet. Building operations and systems are managed by a property management company. All public entrances to the project building have 5\' floor mats in place, and the entire lobby floor is installed with cobbled stone to achieve the exact intent of this credit. Furthermore, there is a 25\' long carpeted area directly in front of the elevators, which acts as a walk-off mat that further reduces fine particulates from entering the building. Finally, the project building is in San Francisco, where the climate is always mild (no snow, leaves, etc), and as a result does not have substantial environmental debris tracking into the building. The current entryway system (floor mats, cobble stone area and carpet) is cleaned on a daily basis using a vacuum that is compliant with EQ 3.7 Green Cleaning: Sustainable Cleaning Equipment. We propose that the project building is clearly addressing the intent of EQ 3.8, although it does not meet the exact requirements outlined in the Reference Guide (specifically that at least 10 feet of mats must be in place immediately inside all public entryways). Proposed submittals include photos, lobby floor plan and two narratives: (a) describing how the entry system meets the intent of the credit and (b) describing the maintenance and cleaning strategies for the entry system. The project team requests that the point be granted on the basis that the project building is effectively reducing the exposure of building occupants and maintenance personnel to potentially hazardous chemical, biological and particulate contaminants." "This credit can only be achieved through the use of 10\' entryway systems specifically designed to capture moisture, dirt, dust, pollen and other particles. Entryway systems consist of fibers and textures specifically design to scrape, wipe, and hold moisture and particles from footwear. It is not apparent or verifiable that cobblestone functions equivalently; conventional carpeting is never appropriate as part of a entryway systems because of the difficulty associated with extracting trapped particles through cleaning and moisture issues. Applicable Internationally.\n\nPlease see updated guidance for this LEED Interpretation under a LEED Interpretation Ruling 10098 posted date 8/01/2011. Projects registered on or after this date must use the new ruling." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2529" "2009-03-10" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our inpatient hospital project seeks to satisfy the permanent entryway system requirement of this credit through the use of semi-permanent walk-off carpet tiles that are thoroughly cleaned by internal staff on a regular basis. The semi-permanent walk-off carpet tiles are comparable to the permanent grates, grills, slotted systems, and roll-out mats in their ability to capture dirt and particulates and prevent them from entering the building. The project\'s walk-off carpet tile utilizes needlepunch hair-like face fibers and has a pile height of .165 inches allowing this durable walk-off carpet tile to capture dirt and particulates. Our inpatient hospital project is acutely aware of the importance of creating environments that have exceptional indoor air quality. Owner experience and testimonials have indicated that the semi-permanent walk-off carpet tiles perform as well as - if not better than - the permanent systems, when cleaned on a regular basis. The project\'s inpatient hospital Environmental Services Plan requires maintenance staff to be educated on proper maintenance procedures and to participate in ongoing training to establish and maintain an environment that has a high level of infection control, to meet the requirements of the Joint Commission and other regulatory organizations. The proposed credit documentation is based on a June 2008 credit interpretation ruling that permits internal maintenance staff to clean the walk-off areas on a regular basis in lieu of a 2-year service contract with an outside organization. In addition to all other credit required documentation, the credit submittal will include: - A copy of the Environmental Services Plan indicating that the walk-off carpet tiles will be vacuumed on a daily basis, will be thoroughly cleaned on a weekly basis, and highly trafficked tiles will be replaced on an annual basis. - A signed acknowledgment from maintenance staff that they have read, understand, and will comply with the Environmental Services Plan. Compliance with the Environmental Services Plan will be included in job descriptions for maintenance staff for no less than two years. - A signed letter from the Owner stating their commitment to the Environmental Services Plan for no less than 2 years. - Product specifications for the walk-off carpet tiles. Our inpatient hospital project believes that providing walk-off areas at regularly used entrances and exits that utilize a flooring material that prevents dirt and particles from entering the building, as the semi-permanent walk-off carpet tile does, and being committed to cleaning these areas on a regular basis meets the intent of the first part of the credit. Of course, all other requirements for this credit will be met. Please advise if this will meet the intent, requirements, and documentation required to achieve this point." "The proposed use of semi-permanent walk-off carpet tiles that are maintained and replaced, as described would be an acceptable alternative system to the credit requirements of a permanently installed system or roll-out mats. Please provide the stated documentation for the LEED submission process." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2546" "2009-03-25" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our inpatient hospital project will meet all requirements of the point including the use of permanent entryway systems as outlined in the reference guide at all regularly used entrances with the exception of the one entryway described below. The lone regularly used entrance, located at the lower level materials management area, serves as a point of access for materials management area staff and as a point of access for deliveries by way of small fork-lift or heavy cart. As such, this lone entrance does not lend itself to the use of a permanent entryway system as outlined in the reference guide. Taking this into consideration, along with understanding that the usage patterns of those who will be accessing the building through this doorway indicate that their activities will be limited to this materials management area and will rarely venture to other portions of the hospital, and understanding that the spaces in this area are non-regularly occupied spaces, our project is looking to fulfill the intent of the permanent entryway system requirement by considering this entire area as a walk-off area. This area contains a walk off corridor with resilient tile in the path of travel of not less than eighty-five feet that shall be cleaned on a daily basis. This resilient tile walk-off area is flanked by the non-regularly occupied spaces of materials management storage and central mechanical room. Our hospital project is acutely aware of the importance of creating environments that have exceptional air quality; as such this walk-off area will be thoroughly cleaned on a daily basis. The project\'s inpatient hospital Environmental Services Plan requires maintenance staff to be educated on proper maintenance procedures and to participate in ongoing training to establish and maintain an environment that has a high level of infection control to meet the requirements of the Joint Commission and other regulatory organizations. In addition, to minimize the impact on air quality, this area will be served by a dedicated mechanical system that is not connected to other areas of the hospital. In addition to all other credit required documentation, the credit submittal will include: - A copy of the Environmental Services Plan indicating that the resilient tiles at this entrance will be thoroughly cleaned on a daily basis. - Signed acknowledgments from maintenance staff that they have read, understand, and will comply with the Environmental Services Plan. Compliance with the Environmental Services Plan will be included in job descriptions for maintenance staff for no less than two years. - A signed letter from the Owner stating their commitment to the Environmental Services Plan for no less than 2 years. - Product specifications for the resilient tiles used at this entrance. Please advise if this will meet the intent, requirements, and documentation required to achieve this point." "The applicant is requesting that the use of permanent, resilient carpet tile in the hallway be accepted as an alternative to walk-off mats. This issue has been addressed by a previous CIR dated 3/10/2009. The list of submitted documentation provided appears to be consistent with the required documentation for the existing CIR and satisfies the intent of the credit." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5051" "2007-05-30" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "In our first floor computer server areas, we will have some workbenches where equipment is tested and repaired. Occasionally workers have to fix a connection with a soldering iron. Typically, these soldering irons have been located at each workbench for occasional and very short use. It is an industry standard practice to allow the soldering to occur at work benches for convenience and efficiency (rather than to require it be done in an enclosed room). The company\'s EHS leaders are not concerned about soldering smoke inhalation because it is very brief. Moreover, these server areas are provided with ample air changes well above even the LEED EQ 2 Increased Ventilation credit (this is needed just to keep the servers cool). However, these air changes probably don\'t provide the amount of pressure required for this credit (EQ 5). How does EQ 5 Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control apply to this situation? We propose several options for addressing this, in order of difficulty for our client: 1. Do nothing. The soldering is very limited (typically just a few seconds and very infrequent), and comparable to the amount of fumes produced by typical desktop office equipment such as desktop printers (which are also exempt from the exhaust requirement). 2. Provide portable fume hoods to employees for soldering use. 3. Provide carbon filters in the air return to make sure even the small amount of fumes are cleaned from the air before it goes through a cycle. 4. Provide the soldering irons at each workbench for short use, but also provide an enclosed/exhausted room for workers to use when performing more intensive soldering activities longer than a few seconds. (This would be a large expense where square-footage is at a premium.) 5. Restrict all soldering to an enclosed/exhausted room. Please let us know which option(s) would allow us to maintain the LEED credit." "The CIR has indicated that minor computer repairs, involving minor soldering, takes place within the computer server areas and is inquiring if special IAQ control measures are required to enable compliance with the intent of EQc5. Although the soldering that takes place in the computer server areas is minor and intermittent as indicated by the CIR inquiry, there are still emissions being introduced into the air for the computer server room. The inquiry has indicated a number of options to comply with the intent and requirements of EQc5. The two options that are acceptable to satisfy the credit requirements for this specific project case are: Option 2 - Provide portable fume hoods to employees for use when field soldering components*; and Option 5 - Restrict all soldering to an enclosed room with appropriate separations, negative pressurization, and separate exhaust. *The portable fume hood must be capable of achieving the negative pressurization required for chemical use areas and must have onboard filtration media to remove generated contaminants from the air that is exhausted back into the computer server areas. The project team should/must provide manufacturer\'s documentation for the selected fume hood to confirm the performance complies with the noted requirements. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5061" "2007-08-13" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "The project intends to meet the permanent entryway system and exhaust system requirements of the credit criteria. The project is requesting an interpretation of the acceptability of the method proposed to meet the MERV 13 filtration requirement. The project HVAC system is a dual path HVAC system: Outside air for ventilation is provided by 100% fresh air air-handlers with heat recovery from exhaust air. These air handlers will be equipped with MERV 13 filtration or better as well as other features for achieving high efficiency. Zone conditioning will be provided by fan coils receiving a mixture of return air from the space and fresh air from the air handlers described above. In this respect, the fan coils provide a similar function to that of fan powered terminal units on a conventional variable air volume system and similar to that system, MERV 13 filtration is not possible on the zone fan coil level. The design team believes that the design meets the intent of the credit for filtration since all outside air introduced into the building will be filtered to the high standard of MERV 13." "The CIR inquiry indicates that the project receives 100% of its outside air through air handling units that are equipped with MERV 13 filtration, as required by EQc5. Additional fan coil units are located within the building to provide supplemental zone conditioning. The fan coil units supply a combination of the minimum ventilation outdoor air plus air recirculated from the room. Since the fan coil units recirculate room air, they must have MERV 13 filters, which are available on the market. Therefore, the design, as described, does not appear to meet the intent of the credit. \n\n **Updated January 1, 2014\n NOTE: UPDATED CREDIT LANGUAGE FOR 2009 STATES THAT ""PARTICLE FILTERS OF AIR CLEANING DEVICES SHALL BE PROVIDED TO CLEAN THE OUTDOOR AIR AT ANY LOCATION PRIOR TO ITS INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPIED SPACES"". REQUIREMENT FOR FILTRATION ON RETURN AIR IS NO LONGER APPLICABLE TO ANY VERSION OR ANY RATING SYSTEM." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5064" "2007-08-13" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our LEED-NC v2.2 project includes 5 high rise hotels having an approximate total of 5,000 guest rooms with two-pipe chilled water fan coil units and supplemental electric heating. The windows within the guest rooms are not operable, and mechanical ventilation is ducted directly to each guest room from central air handling systems utilizing 100% outdoor air commercial rooftop units. The amount of outdoor air delivered to each guest room meets or exceeds the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1-2004. All air exhausted from the toilet rooms is ducted directly to the outdoors. The third part of the requirement for EQ 5 requires MERV 13 or better filtration on all building HVAC systems serving regularly occupied spaces. The guest room fan coil units cannot physically handle the MERV 13 filters due to filter size and increased air pressure drop across the filter. The corridor supply units, which are commercial grade, can and will be provided with MERV 13 filters. The project design will also meet both of the other requirements for this credit for the entryway systems and chemical and pollutant exhaust and control. We propose to meet the credit requirements by providing MERV 8 filters on all guest room fan coil units and MERV 13 filters on the commercial rooftops serving the corridors. All outdoor air ventilation is provided through the rooftop units. The fan coils will handle only recirculated air within each guest room. These filtration levels are the best that the systems can accommodate. We feel that this approach meets the intent of the credit while providing a practical and superior approach to hotel applications. Is this approach acceptable?" "The filtration portion of NCv2.2 EQc5 requires MERV 13 filters should be applied to process both outside air and return air that is to be delivered as supply air. The recirculated air that you are referencing would be considered return air, and would therefore need to be filtered with MERV 13 filters. The credit states that the design team should ""Ensure that air handling units can accommodate required filter sizes and pressure drops"". The fan-coil units would be considered to be air handling units as they process air for human use. MERV 13 filters are available in a 2"" thick version. Upsizing of fan coil fan motors would allow for the increased pressure drop required for the filter. NOTE: UPDATED CREDIT LANGUAGE FOR 2009 STATES THAT ""PARTICLE FILTERS OF AIR CLEANING DEVICES SHALL BE PROVIDED TO CLEAN THE OUTDOOR AIR AT ANY LOCATION PRIOR TO ITS INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPIED SPACES"". REQUIREMENT FOR FILTRATION ON RETURN AIR IS NO LONGER APPLICABLE TO ANY RATING SYSTEM. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5129" "2008-07-02" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Are data centers and telecom rooms considered non-regularly occupied rooms for the purposes of EQ5? This Credit Interpretation Request is in reference to a 92,000 square foot office building and research laboratory that includes a 5000 square foot data center. As part of the credit, we are required to provide air filtration with a Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) of 13 or better for all supply air serving regularly occupied spaces. The 5000 sqft data center and associated telecom rooms house data equipment and power distribution equipment. The data center does not include support areas, offices, cubicles, chairs, desks, etc. We are proposing to air condition the data center with floor mounted computer room air conditioning units. These air conditioning units are typically not furnished with MERV 13 filtration. The Reference Manual does not clearly define \'regularly occupied spaces\' in the chapter on \'Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control\'. Regularly occupied spaces are defined in the chapter on \'Day Light and Views\', EQ Credit 8.1. The definitions at the end of this chapter define regularly occupied spaces as where workers are seated or standing as they work inside a building. Non-regularly occupied spaces include corridors, hallways, lobbies, storage rooms, kitchens, restrooms, stairwells, etc. Non-occupied spaces include rooms used by maintenance personnel that are not open for use by occupants. Non-occupied spaces include janitorial, storage and equipment rooms. We believe that this data center and the telecom rooms are equipment type rooms and are not regularly occupied. There are not any seats or desks in the data center. The data center is used by personnel for computer maintenance and upgrades. Kitchens, copy rooms, and break rooms are in the non-regularly occupied category. These rooms are used more extensively than the data center. Please confirm that MERV 13 filters are not required for air-conditioning units serving the data center and telecom rooms and that this approach will meet the requirements of EQ Credit 5." "Can a data center that does not include any support areas, offices, cubicles, chairs, or desks be considered a non-regularly occupied space for the purpose of EQc5 calculations? Yes, as described this space is not intended to house any people during an average workday and may be considered a non-regularly occupied space. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5177" "2009-01-23" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our building is a 114,000 sf food processing plant, with office space on one side of the building and process spaces and warehouses on the other. In order to fulfill the intent of this credit, all copy and maintenance rooms have hard ceilings and self-closing doors, and will be exhausted sufficiently to create negative pressure. Air filtration media will provide a MERV rating of 13. Walk-off mats will be installed at all regular entry points into the building, and a cleaning service will be contracted to replace the dirty mats and clean them off-site. We are asking whether the design and cleaning program of our 16 loading bays will comply with the requirements of this credit. To prevent contaminants from entering the building, our loading bay area has been designed with a continuous pit and vertical storing system for the loading docks. We use this design because it far exceeds traditional pit set-up both for cleanliness and thermal efficiency. Such a system differs from the norm for three reasons relevant to this credit: 1) The dock doors close all the way to the dock floor when not in use, preventing dirt and debris from entering. A tight seal is made between floor and door, further hindering pollutant entry. 2) The continuous pit - a space approximately 4ft deep between warehouse floor and bay door which runs the length of the dock bay area and is 18 inches lower than the warehouse floor - serves as a catch basin for dust or particulates coming into the building and allows for easy routine cleaning. 3) Vertical storing dock leveler design further supports easy routine pit cleaning and wash downs by remaining out of the way when not in use. We believe that the innovative design of our loading bays - coupled with the planned stringent cleaning program of this food-grade manufacturing plant - meets the intent of credit EQ 5. Please advise." "The project team is asking whether providing a continuous pit in the loading dock would meet the entryway system requirements of the credit. As described in this CIR, the loading dock entryways into the warehouse do not qualify as regular entry points for building users and thus do not need to be provided with entryway systems. The strategies employed by the project team to reduce indoor chemical and pollutant sources are commendable and encouraged but they are not required by this credit.\n\n **Update October 1, 2013: Applicable credits have been updated." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5189" "2009-04-09" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "The project to which this CIR pertains is a vocational school for high school-aged students. Within this building there are science labs. The two science laboratory classrooms share one preparation room. Each of the three spaces is served by a dedicated heat pump. Each space is also exhausted, per the requirements of the Ohio School Facilities Commission\'s 2008 Ohio School Design Manual. We are writing this CIR to confirm that our design approach meets the intent of Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 5, Indoor Pollutant and Chemical Source Control. In the heat pump systems, as designed, each room has it\'s own dedicated heat pump. This unit takes air from the dedicated space only, mixes it with fresh air from a dedicated outside air unit, heats or cools it accordingly and supplies it back to the space. In keeping with the EQc5 requirements, each of these units is to be provided with MERV 13 filtration that will handle both the air from the space and the fresh air. No air is sent to another space, nor is any air brought to the science labs from another space by the HVAC system. The supply and exhaust air rates have been balanced to maintain the proper negative pressurization of each space as per EQc5. The preparation room will be negative relative to the adjacent corridor and two science labs. The exhaust systems are ducted directly to the outside through the building roof. Architecturally, each room will feature deck-to-deck partitions and self-closing doors, as required. The Credit Requirements state that no air must be recirculated. We believe the intent of this statement is to prohibit recirculating air between rooms, which we have eliminated with our design. The Heat Pump only uses air from the room it serves and fresh air provided via direct ducting. No air from this space will travel to another space within the building. In addition, the supply air volume, by design, shall remain less than the exhaust air volume to maintain the required negative pressurization. Further more, we consider the air in a K-12 classroom laboratory to be Class 2 air per ASHRAE 62.1-2004. According to Section 5.17.3.2 Class 2 Air: ""may be recirculated within the space of origin."" Therefore, we believe the HVAC system as described above meets the intent and requirements of LEED for Schools EQc5. We also believe the same to be true for fan-powered VAV boxes, classroom unit ventilators and in-room fan coil units." "The applicant is requesting clarification regarding recirculation of air in science labs. Ventilation systems may recirculate air within isolated spaces where chemicals may be present or used, provided that air is not recirculated to other spaces and that both the outside air and return air are filtered by filtration media with a MERV rating of 13 or greater. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5219" "2009-05-20" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our project is a large destination resort, with hotel and timeshare components. For all the frequently used entry locations, except these ones explained below, we will provide either permanently installed grate products or removable mats (with documented maintenance regimen) of the required dimensions. Our questions address entryway systems at the following two specific entrance locations. Location 1: Beachfront restaurant: The dining areas for a freestanding beachfront restaurant are under cover and open-air without enclosing walls on three sides, with the wall of the enclosed kitchen on the fourth side. The floor surface in some areas is beach sand; in others it is sandstone, basalt and limestone. Entryways between the adjacent hardscape, beach areas and lawn, and the dining areas, extend along much of the perimeter of the dining areas. Because of the indoor-outdoor character of the dining areas, open access along the perimeter, and the sand flooring, we propose not to include an entryway system between the dining areas and the ""outside,\' and we propose to include the required entryway system between the dining areas and the kitchen to keep sand and other particles from being brought into the kitchen. Is this approach acceptable? Location 2: Meeting room area: The resort includes a small conference center which is a pavilion within a courtyard accessible only through the public areas of the hotel. The courtyard includes covered hardscape walkways and uncovered landscaped and hardscaped areas. Because the courtyard and the conference center are accessible only through the public areas of the hotel, entrances to which have compliant entryway systems, is it acceptable not to have entryway systems at the doorways between the covered exterior walkways and the meeting rooms that comprise the conference center?" "The applicant is asking if the two areas described above can be exempted from the entry way system requirements of this credit. For Location 1 as described above, it appears as though this area does not qualify as a regular entry to the building, because the occupied area described is open to the outdoors and not a fully enclosed building area. Therefore, Location 1 is exempt from the entry way system requirement. For Location 2 as described above, it appears as though this area is a regular entry to the building as occupants pass between open air, exposed areas (covered walkways) before entering the enclosed meeting rooms. Therefore this space would require the entry way systems as described in the credit language." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5225" "2009-05-20" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "This CIR references the provisions for appropriate air filtration media for an office and warehouse distribution facility, as per EQc5. The intent of this credit is to minimize exposure of occupants to potentially hazardous particulates and chemical pollutants. We have accomplished this by traditional means in the office areas by: 1. Employing permanent entryway systems, 2. Exhausting areas with hazardous gases or chemicals sufficiently, 3. Providing proper filtration media: a. The main and warehouse offices will have MERV-8 pre-filters and MERV-13 final filters. b. Green cleaning strategies have been employed throughout the building. As stated on the USGBC website, ""LEED for New Construction and Major Renovations is a green building rating system that was designed to guide and distinguish high-performance commercial and institutional projects, with a focus on office buildings. Recognizing that the warehouse is a ""LEED challenged building type"" and clearly and systematically differentiates from commercial office buildings, there have not been any specific requirements developed to consider this building type. Therefore, to design for minimizing exposure of occupants to potentially hazardous particulates and chemical pollutants in this building type, we referenced ASHRAE Standard 52.2-1999 that provides specifics to warehouse efficiency requirements. The following recommendations were implemented: 1. Selecting the highest recommended filter efficiency for warehouses (MERV-8) based on ASHRAE Standard 52.2-1999. a. ASHRAE recommends 10% (MERV-1) to 35% composite average particle size efficiency for warehouses (MERV-8). b. Typical applications for MERV-13 filtration according to ASHRAE are for high end Commercial Office buildings and healthcare areas such as surgical suites/operating rooms. Based on following ASHRAE\'s requirements, MERV-8 filtration (35%) is considered high end for warehouses. 2. Green cleaning strategies will be employed throughout the building. 3. Trucks are not permitted to idle. 4. No propane fork trucks are permitted or combustion vehicles in the interior. Although we have been awarded this credit for several of our projects using MERV-8 filters in warehouse buildings we wanted to clarify it for other design teams." "The applicant is asking if the warehouse spaces of the project can be exempted from the MERV-13 filtration requirement of this credit. No, based on previous LEED NC 2.2 CIRs, dated 8/13/2008 and 2/12/2008, all air (ventilation and return air) supplied to occupied areas of the building must pass through MERV-13 filtration and therefore the warehouse areas cannot be exempt from this credit requirement. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5266" "2007-05-30" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Background: Our project is a high rise building with street level entrances and below grade level building entrances from an inter-modal transportation hall, public transportation systems, and directly from other buildings. This inter-modal transportation hall includes an indoor shopping / amenity arcade, which connects a wide range of retail shops and public transportation (PATH, MTA). This inter-modal transportation network (which is not included in the scope of Tower One) will be a fully enclosed space with conditioned and filtered air, that will also be clean and maintained. The distance traveled from the closest outdoor entry point through the inter-modal transportation hall to the building concourse level entrance is over 500 feet Project Design Approach for Applying EQc5: The entire project design does meet and exceed the air filtration, partitioning, and exhaust requirements of EQc5. The street level entryways designs do have permanent walk off systems that meet the requirements in EQc5. Conclusion and CIR: The concourse entrances will be regular entry points to the building. The concourse entrances are accessed via a conditioned, filtered, clean indoor space and as such it is a significantly cleaner adjacent environment than the street. We are requesting confirmation of our interpretation that the concourse entrances are not ""entryways that are directly connected to the out doors"" as stated in the EQc5 requirement for the application of walk off systems." "The requirements of EQc5 apply only to entryways that are directly connected to the outdoors. The connection between concourses and interior space does not apply to the requirements of this credit. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5460" "2005-02-07" "New Construction" "A CIR ruling from 1/18/2005 (EQc5) stated that "" [i]f there is a janitorial / housekeeping room in the building then it must meet the criteria for this credit by providing the ventilation requirements and deck-to-deck partitions,"" even if the building adhered to a green housekeeping policy that required only GreenSeal-compliant cleaning materials to be used in the building. In contrast, a CIR ruling from 6/24/2003 (also EQc5), stated that ""The green housekeeping program is commendable but not directly applicable to credit achievement. However, because of this program, there does not appear to be chemical use in this building that would require a separate drainage system, and thus such a system will not be required."" Logical consistency dictates that if no drainage system is required, then no ventilation and partition requirement would be required either. We presume that simply calling the room where green housekeeping chemicals are stored a \'janitorial closet\' couldn\'t trigger the requirements -- we could simply rename the room and then our facts would be the same as the school in the 6/24/2003 ruling. Please clarify whether the 1/18/2005 ruling intended to overrule the 6/24/2003 ruling, or alternatively, please explain what would appear to be a logical inconsistency (no drains are required but ventilation and partitions are required?), or please revise the 1/18/2005 ruling to confirm that if we are using a green housekeeping policy (all GreenSeal-compliant), that this eliminates the requirement for ventilation/partitions/drainage to meet the credit intent. Also please respond to the question in the 1/18/2005 CIR whether, absent a requirement for partitions/ventilation/drains, the credit could be achieved simply with walkoff mats and entryway systems. " "The 1/18/2005 ruling is NOT intended to overrule the 6/24/2003 ruling. Two separate issues are being addressed by these two CIRs. The first one is dealing with the need for chemical mixing areas to have segregated areas with deck to deck partitions and separate outside exhaust. The second one is to do with appropriate disposal of liquid waste in spaces where water and chemical concentrate mixing occurs. In both cases, the CIRs are consistent with the Rating System and Reference Guide requirements. Green housekeeping products still contain chemicals which need to be contained and dealt with per the credit requirements (albeit at lower levels). Therefore, even if the project only uses Green Seal compliant cleaning products, it would still need to meet the criteria of providing the ventilation requirements and deck-to-deck partitions. This is also noted in the CIR ruling dated 1/24/2005 which states that ""Green housekeeping cleaners contain chemicals that need to be addressed."" This credit does NOT differentiate between rooms that store Green-Seal-compliant cleaning products and those that store industry standard products. The need for drains plumbed for appropriate disposal of liquid waste is a separate issue from the ventilation requirements. As noted in CIR ruling dated 2/18/2002, sinks that dispose of chemicals, such as detergents, which are approved by the local water treatment facility, can be part of a conventional sanitary drainage system. If greywater is being directed to re-use for irrigation or uses or to a natural wastewater treatment system, then separate plumbing would be required for disposal of conventional cleaning agents. Projects should check with their local treatment facilities to confirm what the jurisdiction requirements are for chemical disposal. In response to the question raised in CIR ruling dated 1/18/2005, a project MAY be able to meet this requirement by only providing permanent walkoff mats and entryway systems if NO chemicals (of any type) are mixed and stored on-site. If any chemicals are mixed or stored on-site, then the criteria for containment, ventilation and plumbing will apply.\n\n **Update October 1, 2013: Applicable credits have been updated." "None" "None" "X"