Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "1470" "2006-04-04" "New Construction, Existing Buildings" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "LEED IEQ 6 requires the initial determination of room occupancy using ASHRAE 62-2201, Table 2. We have been attempting to pursue this credit point for a hospital renovation/addition consisting of approximately 100,000 gsf of Intensive Care, Critical Care, Emergency Department and Outpatient procedure spaces. But we have been finding that the ASHRAE table is so limiting in it\'s brief list of room types that we are expecting to have to submit to the USGBC the \'narrative justifying exceptions\' that is mentioned in the Reference Manual, pg 288, for a majority of the roughly 400 spaces: For example, a straight-forward application of the reference standard results in the following \'regular occupancies\'; A 459 sf CAT scan room, using the ASHRAE occupancy of 20/1,000 sf for Medical Procedures, has an occupant load of (9) people. Similarly, a 257 sf critical care room, using the 10/1,000 for Patient Rooms, has an occupant load of (3), requiring (3) lighting, (3) airflow & (3)temperature controls. The more we consider how to apply the ASHRAE table in determining the number of controls, the more we wonder if (a) we are failing to understand some important nuance of the instructions; OR (b) how most any project team could pursue this point without having to submit an enormous number of the written justifications; OR (c) if this is a point that is suitable only for a remarkably small number of projects (and project types) to pursue. Would the USGCB accept a submission that includes many dozens of \'exceptions\' arguing, for example, that a 324 square foot x-ray room has one (non-regular occupant) patient and only one (regular occupant) technician? Isn\'t there somewhere a better standard for use in determining occupancy? Thank you, Andrew M. GIl, AIA LEED AP HOLT Architects, P.C. Ithaca, NY 14850 amg@HOLT.com" "The intent of the credit is to provide a high level of thermal, ventilation and lighting system control in order to promote the productivity, comfort and well-being of building occupants. The USGBC recognizes the unique purpose and functions that take place in healthcare-related facilities. Instead of providing justifications for each individual room/space, the proposed approach of consolidating the exceptions based upon functional type seems reasonable. For these exceptions, explain how the local environment is controlled or adjusted by the regular occupants. At this time, the credit suggests referencing ASHRAE 62-2001 for determining occupancy densities, but it is not required for credit compliance. If another method or reference is used, then the reasoning would need to be documented and justified." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1722" "2007-03-22" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "The project team is providing thermostat controls at all shared multi-occupant spaces in our project and the client would like to provide staff with desktop air purifier units that provide individual occupant control of air speed. The personal air purifier units have the following features: three speeds control, 70" "The project team is correct in stating that individual control over one of the primary thermal comfort factors (i.e. air temperature, radiant temperature, air speed, and humidity) will satisfy the controllability requirement of this credit. The personal air purifiers described above will provide occupants individual control over air speed. However, the intent of this credit is to make thermal comfort controllability an integral part of the building design for occupants. Therefore, unless the fans/air-purifiers are hard-wired in the building system, they will not satisfy the requirement of this credit. Similarly, plug-in desktop fans will not satisfy the requirement of this credit which deals with providing thermal comfort control as an integral part of the building design. Note that for the purposes of this credit, the fan component of the device is of importance. The air purification feature of the device does not address thermal comfort and thus will not add to the thermal comfort controllability of the device. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1770" "2007-05-07" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Healthcare" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "The project team is providing individual floor air valves each with variable duration (open / close) primary air dampers and multi-position diffusers for occupant comfort conditioning as part of an under floor air distribution system. Individual floor air valves will be provided for a minimum of 50% of the building occupants. The variable duration (open/close) primary air dampers in the floor air valves will be controlled using thermostats. Multiple air valves will be connected to one thermostat, such that there will not be one thermostat for 50% of the occupants. However, all of the local floor air valves include multi-position adjustable floor diffusers which are integral to each floor air valve. At a minimum, 50% of the occupants will have control over the primary air flow direction out of the local floor air valve in their space (comfort zone) by adjusting the multi-position local floor diffuser air outlet. Changing the direction of the air flow inherently changes the speed of the airflow in a given direction. LEED NC v.2.2, First Edition, Reference Guide, p361, indicates: Conditions for Thermal Comfort per ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 include the following as primary factors: air temperature, radiant temperature, air speed, and humidity. The Reference guide also states that, ""Comfort System control, for the purposes of this credit, is defined as the provision of control over at least one of these primary factors in the occupant\'s local environment"" and that ""Individual adjustments may involve individual thermostat controls, local diffusers at floor, desk or overhead levels, or control of individual radiant panels, and energy system design."" This CIR is to confirm that providing air valves, with multi position diffusers, that allow more than 50% of the occupants to change the direction of airflow out of their floor diffuser (which changes the speed in that direction) will satisfy the LEED credit requirement for thermal comfort." "The applicant is asking whether multi position diffusers that allow changes in direction of airflow satisfy the requirements for individual comfort control for EQc6.2. The applicant is suggesting that changing the direction of airflow inherently changes the speed of the airflow in a given direction, meeting credit compliance by providing control of air speed. Simply changing the direction of airflow in one\'s workspace does not adequately meet the credit intent to provide individual comfort controls. Individual diffusers must have the ability to regulate the speed of the air leaving the diffuser, not simply the direction of airflow. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1826" "2007-08-13" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "The project intends to meet the intent of the credit using the following method: 1. Where possible, enclosed perimeter spaces will be provided with operable windows meeting the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1-2004 Paragraph 5.1 for natural ventilation. It is anticipated that approximately 20% of the building occupants will reside in these naturally ventilated zones. 2. Open office spaces not within the window ventilation zones will be provided with a temperature control system interface allowing occupants within each zone to vote for a space temperature setpoint in that zone. This interface will permit the space temperature to be adjusted up or down by an adjustable range of temperature (+/-2" "The Credit Interpretation is asking whether a system whereby the temperature is adjusted based on the majority vote of the occupants in a space, meets the intent of this credit. It is unclear how the final temperature is determined based on individual votes, and what the timeframe of adjustments is in the system. It is possible to imagine a scenario where the resulting temperature satisfies none of the voters\' individual needs (e.g. if half of the occupants vote for a 2 degrees increase and half of the occupants vote for a 2 degrees decrease in temperature). The intent of the EQc6.2 is to give a high level of thermal comfort control by individual occupants to fit individual tasks and preferences. Based on the information provided, the system proposed will not meet the intent of the credit. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2018" "2008-01-29" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "The building in question will be a 200,000 square feet warehouse with a 300 square feet office space. Goods and materials stored in the warehouse will not require temperature and/or humidity control. As such, the warehouse area will be designed as naturally conditioned per ASHRAE 55-2004; Section 5.3 during the cooling season. ASHRAE 55-2004; Section 5.3 ""Optional Method for Determining Acceptable Thermal Conditions in Naturally Conditioned Spaces"" is intended for spaces where the thermal conditions are regulated primarily by the occupants through opening and closing of windows as needed - and meeting the requirements of ASHRAE 62.1-2004, paragraph 5.1, Natural Ventilation. There will be large industrial sized paddle fans to provide air movement within the warehouse area. Heating for the warehouse area will be accommodated with unit heaters or a geothermal system. (The office space will be naturally and mechanically conditioned as needed.) Requirements for this credit state that operable windows may be used in lieu of comfort controls for areas that are 20 feet inside and 10 feet to either side of the operable part of the window. Does this apply to the warehouse space since it is not a regularly occupied space? If operable windows are still required what is the size, location, and spacing requirements of these windows? Please rule if this strategy would be consistent with the intent of this credit." "The CIR is inquiring as to whether warehouse space needs to be included in the calculations for EQc6.2. The project has to meet Prerequisite 1 and the description here does not indicate this has been met. ASHRAE 62.1-2004 defines occupied spaces as follows: ""An enclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time."" For the warehouse space, operable windows can serve as the thermal comfort control for the perimeter portions of the room using the natural ventilation requirements. The LEED reference guide credit description and section 5.1 of ASHRAE 62.1-2004 prescribe spacing and sizing requirements for these windows. Interior portions of the space (more than 25\' from an external wall) or perimeter spaces that do not meet the requirements of section 5.1 must have some other method of control over thermal comfort, as described in the credit description. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2132" "2008-07-15" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "According to the LEED CS 2.0 Reference Guide, ""the intent of this credit.is to provide building HVAC systems that can be expanded to allow for a high degree of occupant control"". It also says ""buildings that use an overhead VAV system will have to demonstrate that it is possible for the system to provide enough control points for 50% of the occupants"". We have designed a 4-story speculative office building with operable windows around the perimeter. The operable windows comply with the required ASHRAE standard for free opening area. Since the building was not designed for a specific tenant, we have calculated the occupancy of the building based on the default occupancy numbers in Appendix 1 (250 gsf/ occupant). We have calculated the number of occupants on each floor that will be served by the operable windows in lieu of individual controls. We then determined the occupants on each floor that will require individual control points to meet the credit requirement. We have installed central air handling units on each floor with a VAV control system that has the capacity to provide these individual control points. We are not able to confirm whether or not the future tenants will agree to install that number of controls. Our question is: If we have installed a system of central air handling units, expandable VAV box controls, and operable windows throughout the building that we can show has the capacity to provide the individual thermal comfort controls required by the credit - but are not able to insure that these controls will be installed by the tenants - do we successfully meet the credit requirements? And also, since we do not have a specific tenant for the space, how can we estimate the number of individual workstations and the number of shared multi-occupant spaces as required on the LEED Online submittal template for this credit?" "The project team is asking whether by installing a system of central air handling units, expandable VAV box controls, and operable windows throughout the building that can be shown to have the capacity to provide the individual thermal comfort controls required by the credit, the project team is meeting the credit requirements. The approach described above will meet the intent of the credit, provided that the following revision be included: The project team should estimate the number of shared multi-occupant spaces to be included in the project and ensure that the VAV control system has the capacity to provide these control points in addition to the individual occupant control points required. In order to document the credit on the LEED Submittal Template, the project team should use the estimated number of occupants as the number of individual workstations required on the Submittal Template. Also the project team should use the estimated number of shared multi-occupant spaces to be included in the project, as the number of shared multi-occupant spaces required on the Submittal Template. Provide a narrative to describe the approach taken to estimate the number of required control points and describe how the project team has ensured that the required number of control points can be provided in future Tenant Improvements, if the future tenants agree to install the controls. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2145" "2008-08-05" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "The project team is supplying individual desktop thermal units that provide supplemental warm or cool air according to the individual\'s desires. The units supplied will be Herman Miller\'s C2 System, and will be provided for at least 50% of building occupants in our project. In order to meet the intent EQc6.2, per the LEED-CI reference guide, to ""provide a high level of thermal and ventilation control for individual occupants to promote the productivity, comfort and wellbeing of building occupants,"" the project team has implemented several thermal and ventilation control strategies. As part of the building design process, the office renovation project used the existing HVAC system to provide adequate airflow according to the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004. Additionally, the thermal comfort factors included in ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 were reviewed in the design phase. These factors included temperature, humidity, and radiant temperature. Finally, individual control over thermal comfort was included with the incorporation of the C2 System. As ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 indicates, individuals may desire temperatures +/-3 degrees Fahrenheit from the HVAC set point depending on clothing, activity levels or individual preference. In order to fulfill the credit requirement to provide at least 50% of occupants with individual control over temperature and ventilation, the project occupants were provided with the C2 System personal, portable, electronic climate control devices as part of the design strategy. Another option considered was to configure additional ducting, VAV boxes, and thermostat controls to extend the existing HVAC system, but this was determined by the project team to be less energy efficient, more costly to install and maintain, and less adaptable to individual comfort and changeable furniture configurations. In the reference guide and previous CIRs, it is stated that individual controls need be hardwired to the building system. The project team would like to suggest that projects be allowed to account for non-hardwired thermal units when pursuing EQc6.2, as is allowed in the requirements for EQc6.1. In the cases of both task lighting and thermal comfort, providing individual controls leads to increased occupant comfort and consequently improved satisfaction and productivity. The provision of personal controls also reduces occupants\' reliance on building systems to meet their individual comfort needs. This clarification will allow project teams following the LEED for Commercial Interiors rating system to accommodate for individual occupant needs in instances where they have limited or no control over the existing building systems beyond their tenant space, as well as in situations where furniture configurations and occupant usage patterns make it advisable to give occupants more flexibility to reposition the units as needed. The project team has also invested in TuffLock padlocks, Herman Miller\'s standard recommendation for the C2 System. With addition of the security cable, the portable system can be tethered to a desktop unit. Additionally, the project team has created a program that will require that at least 50% of the tenant space occupants be provided a C2 System. The program will verify on a monthly basis that the units are accounted for. It is the purpose of the program to identify any lost or stolen C2 Systems. It is our opinion that the C2 System provides individual control over the comfort factors included in ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 while meeting the intent of credit EQ 6.2. We would ask for confirmation that this design solution meets the credit requirements." "The project team is asking whether providing non-hardwired thermal control units (i.e. desktop fans, heaters, or coolers) to at least 50% of the space occupants would meet the requirements of EQc6.2. The intent of this credit is to encourage project teams to design integrated controls that will allow for reaping the long term benefits of occupant satisfaction and productivity. The approach described above will be acceptable in tenant improvement of retrofit projects only if it can be shown clearly that the building ventilation system is incapable of allowing the level of controllability required by this credit. This provision is meant to accommodate Commercial Interiors projects, where the project team has limited or no control over the existing building systems beyond their tenant space. In all other cases, the project team is required to provide adequate controls integrated in the building ventilation design or operable windows, to show compliance with the requirements of this credit. Therefore the approach described above would not be acceptable for other rating systems. This ruling is consistent with previous CIR rulings. Applicable Internationally. " "5120, 100000766" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2547" "2009-03-25" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "In a warehouse type building, there are several office spaces on a mezzanine level. The offices will be occupied on an intermittent basis. All of offices are a similar size and shape, share the same external exposure, and are suitable to be on the same air conditioning zone. If the individual offices have TASK conditioning Diffusers, can each office be considered to have comfort control? The control would be a Thermal-Fuser diffusers with built-in temperature controls that operate dampers on the diffuser itself to vary the amount of airflow to the space. The airflow would be varied to meet an individual room\'s comfort set points." "The applicant is requesting confirmation regarding the use of damper controlled diffusers as thermal comfort controls for occupants in individual workstations. The proposed approach appears to satisfy the credit intent by controlling the air speed/room temperature. Per a CIR dated 3/22/2007, providing individual occupants control over one of the primary thermal comfort factors (i.e., air temperature, radiant temperature, air speed, and humidity) does satisfy the credit requirements. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5120" "2008-06-09" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "The intent of credit EQ 6.2, as stated in the LEED-CI reference guide, is to ""provide a high level of thermal and ventilation control for individual occupants to promote the productivity, comfort and wellbeing of building occupants"". Our office renovation project uses the existing HVAC system to provide adequate airflow and temperature control to meet ASHRAE standards 62.1-2004 and 55-2004. Comfort factors included in standard 55-2004 and reviewed during the design phase included space temperature, humidity, and radiant temperature. As standard 55-2004 and other studies point out, individuals may desire temperatures +/-3 degrees Fahrenheit from the HVAC set point depending on clothing, activity levels or individual preference. To fulfill the credit requirement of providing at least 50% of occupants with individual control of temperature and ventilation, the project occupants were provided personal, portable, electronic climate control devices. The personal climate control device provides warm or cool air by means of a solid-state thermo-electric device (also known as a Peltier device) that produces cold on one side and warm on the other when a DC voltage is applied. Air is forced over each side of the thermo-electric device to deliver warm air and exhaust cool air from the backside, with temperatures ranging from 65 to 102 degrees Fahrenheit, assuming an ambient air temperature of 72. By reversing polarity of the DC voltage, the hot and cold sides are reversed, and cool replaces warm to the front while warm air exhausted from the back. The device is not a high temperature resistance heater, nor is it an air conditioner; it consumes only 60 watts, and does not get so hot that it could be a safety hazard. Recipient surveys of 119 occupants in the project area reported 55% satisfaction with the temperature of their space prior to receiving the personal climate control devices, and 73% satisfaction after using the devices for three months. Recipients indicated they found both heating and cooling valuable to adjusting their thermal environments to their needs. Since occupants could choose either heating or cooling, the design team decided that the unit needed to be portable, rather than being permanently mounted. The portable nature allows occupants to place the units where they have the most need, an important feature that enhances individual control of their personal environment. When the user survey asked if portability was important, 76% responded that being able to move the device to fit their personal needs was indeed important. The intent of credits EQ 6.1 and 6.2, individual controllability, is to provide a high level of individual control and adjustability to occupants. Credit EQ 6.1, controllability of lighting, specifically states that task lights need not be hard-wired. This logic would appear to be similarly applicable to a personal climate control device to allow optimal placement by the occupant. Based on the intent of the controllability credits, we believe that personal climate control devices meet the intent of credit EQ 6.2 and ask for confirmation that this design solution meets the credit intent." "Yes, a personal climate control device, which is not hard-wired, meets the intent of the credit. Applicable Internationally." "2145, 100000766" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5144" "2008-08-13" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "Our project is a 197,850 square foot jail that houses maximum security/special management inmates. The inmates that end up at this facility have proven by their actions that they cannot be controlled in a lower risk environment. At this facility, an inmate gives up more freedoms that he or she may have had at a lower risk facility. This includes control of his or her indoor environment. Giving the inmates either thermal or lighting control would hinder operations for the jail staff. From a practical standpoint, there are reasons why individual environmental controls should not be provided in a maximum security jail. Currently, there are no vandal resistant thermal controls on the market. A thermostat in an inmate\'s cell would likely be destroyed in a few hours. Regarding vandal-resistant lighting controls, there are a few available on the market, but none are truly vandal proof. Inmates could potentially endanger themselves and others by tampering with the light switch in their cell. Though the 432 inmate cells/beds at this facility, including medical inmate cells, are regularly occupied spaces and comprise 23% of the total building area, we ask that these spaces be excluded from both EQ Credit 6.1 and 6.2 for the following reasons: 1.) Thermal and lighting controls within an inmate cell would be highly susceptible to abuse 2.) Electric devices such as light switches could be potentially dangerous for the inmate and others. 3.) Inmates having access to thermal and lighting controls would interfere with jail operations. Within all staff areas, we would provide the lighting and thermal comfort controls required to achieve both EQ Credit 6.1 and 6.2." "No, the area described above, about 23% of the total area, cannot be excluded from the requirements of the project for this maximum security jail. Based on project type, not all credits are applicable to all projects. In this case, as occupant control of thermal comfort systems does not meet the program requirements of the project, it appears that this credit is not applicable. [Note that this LEED Interpretation is also available under IEQc6.1: Controllability of Systems-Lighting]" "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5315" "2008-07-14" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "1. In a health care building which contains both individual offices and exam rooms, can a VAV air terminal unit serve both an office space and an exam room (or multiple exam rooms) still be considered as an individual control for the occupant of the office space as long as the thermostat to control the terminal unit is located within the office. The thought is that the exam rooms are used throughout the day for a variety of patients and do not count as spaces housing building occupants with permanent workstations and therefore does not require individual comfort control (ie. non-regularly occupied space). 2. Unlike Version 2.1, the requirement for individual comfort control for 50% of building occupants does not appear to differentiate between perimeter and interior spaces. If perimeter offices of a building are each provided with an individual air terminal unit and thermostat such that each office has individual control, and the quantity of perimeter offices for the building is more than 50% of the building\'s total offices or workstations (interior and perimeter combined), can it be said that I have met the 50% requirement for the EQ 6.2 Credit? (Thermostat controls would also be provided for multi-occupant spaces such as conference rooms and lecture halls). 3. If two office spaces are served by one air terminal unit with the temperature controls located in only one of the two offices, is this considered to meet the 50% individual comfort control requirement? 4. The Reference Guide lists breakrooms as an example of a Shared Multi-Occupant Space in the text, but lists breakrooms as Non-Regularly Occupied Space in the definitions section. In the hospital setting, we would like to consider them as Non-Regularly Occupied Spaces. 5. Will a nurse station count as a shared multi-occupant space?" "1. Yes, the exam room may be considered a non-regularly occupied space and hence would not be counted towards individual workstations. Therefore, by providing the thermostat control at the office to control the VAV terminal serving both the office and the exam room (or multiple exam rooms) would be considered as an individual comfort control for the occupant of the office. 2. Yes, the credit requirements are met as long as 50% of the individual workstations, irrespective of their location (perimeter or core) are provided with individual comfort control. 3. Yes, if there are two offices/individual workstations in the building then by providing one office/individual workstation with thermal comfort controls the design would meet the 50% requirement for individual comfort control. It should be noted that open plan workstations are counted towards individual workstations and are not considered shared multi-occupant spaces. 4. Yes, the break room in a hospital setting may be considered as a non-regularly occupied space. 5. No, a nurses station would not be counted towards a shared multi-occupant space, but would be considered an open plan workstation and should be counted towards individual workstations. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5321" "2008-08-13" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc6/6.2: Controllability of Systems-Thermal Comfort" "This project will incorporate a multi-occupant space which will contain system furniture teacher workstations. The work stations are intended to supplement each teacher\'s desk space in each of the various classrooms. In addition, the close proximity of other teachers will facilitate focused group intra / inter departmental student discussions and instruction. School administration estimates that each teacher will spend a total of one and one half (1.5) hours to three (3) hours at or near their workstation. This estimated time is an aggregate based on an average of three (3) visits to the workstation area. Thus, each instructor occupies the space in a transient manner, spending an estimated one half (.5) hour to one (1) hour at or near their workstation per visit. Due to the transient nature of the teachers and the intermittent use of the workstations, does this space conform to the intent of a ""Shared Multi-Occupant Space"" especially as described on page 379 of the LEED for Schools 2007 Reference Guide?" "The applicant is requesting clarification regarding whether the teacher workstation area constitutes a shared multi-occupant space. It appears that the request is attempting to define the space as a non-regularly occupied space due to the transient nature of occupancy. The LEED for Schools v2.0 Reference Guide defines regularly occupied spaces as areas where students, teachers, or school administrators are seated or standing as they work or study inside a building. Shared multi-occupant spaces include conference rooms, classrooms, and other indoor spaces used as a place of congregation for presentations, trainings, etc. As such, the teacher workstation area is not considered a group multi-occupant space, but is a regularly occupied space. In order to achieve the credit requirements, individual thermal comfort controls must be provided for a minimum of 50% of the building occupants in workspaces (including the teacher workstation area). Please note that the teacher workstations must also be included as individual workspaces when determining compliance with EQc6.1. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X"