Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "1614" "2006-10-17" "Existing Buildings" "In designing a project for LEED certification, we are planning to specify linoleum sheet flooring in areas of the building. We are requesting that a credit be awarded to this project under LEED EB MRc3 as the flooring will meet VOC emissions requirements of the FloorScore certification program which has more stringent requirements than those required to receive a credit under the CRI Green Label or Green Label Plus programs. We believe that all flooring materials in a building, not just carpet, should have an opportunity to receive credit for meeting stringent VOC emissions requirements. FloorScore is a voluntary, independent certification program that tests and certifies hard surface flooring and associated products for compliance with criteria adopted in California for indoor air emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) with potential health effects. The program uses a small-scale chamber test protocol and incorporates VOC emissions criteria developed by the California Department of Health Services, which are widely known as Section 1350. The FloorScore program was developed by the Resilient Floor Covering Institute (RFCI) in collaboration with Scientific Certification Systems (SCS) following several years of extensive testing of flooring products produced by resilient flooring manufacturers. The program incorporates California Section 1350 procedures and requirements and adapts them to the certification of flooring products for use in typical buildings. RFCI controls the FloorScore program name and logo. SCS acts as the third-party certifier ensuring program integrity and independence. As part of certification, SCS (1) works with the manufacturer to identify the appropriate samples for testing; (2) reviews VOC emission test reports generated by independent testing laboratories for individual candidate products; (3) determines if the test results meet the California Section 1350 requirements for individual VOCs of concern; and (4) periodically inspects manufacturing plants to review product formulas, processing, and quality control in order to define the permitted use of the FloorScore seal. The basis of the VOC criteria used for FloorScore certification is the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) which has an active program to develop chronic toxicity guidelines for air pollutants. The program uses widely accepted procedures developed by the U.S. EPA and includes extensive peer review and public comment. To date, the program has developed Chronic Reference Exposure Levels (CRELS) for 78 chemical substances. The CRELS are concentrations that assume long-term exposures and include a number of uncertainty factors. These guidelines provide a strong scientific basis for the FloorScore program and are consistent with the intent of MRc3 to ""reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, potentially irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants.""" "Yes, the proposed alternative compliance path using FloorScore is acceptable for credit achievement according to the following stipulations. 100% of the non-carpet finished flooring must be FloorScore-certified (as described above), and it must comprise, at minimum, at least 25% of the finished floor area. Potential examples of unfinished flooring include floors in mechanical rooms, electrical rooms, and elevator service rooms. This ruling was justified by the technical committee\'s evaluation of the technical resources used as basis for the standard (California and USEPA sources), and adequate benefit. This CIR went through an official USGBC process for the establishment of performance/intent-equivalent alternative compliance paths. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1924" "2007-10-31" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "The question pertains to a specific carpet line that was manufactured by Bloomsburg Carpet in Bloomsburg, PA. Our project attempted this point in the CI version on the previous floor but was rejected on the grounds that the carpet was Green Label Certified by the CRI, but not Plus. Currently we are using 3 different carpets on the project. Two are manufactured by Lees and are Green Label Plus Certified. The third is as I said Bloomsburg Broadloom. The full line is Tuva Symmetry V840-2 / 15C&R Dove (Zeftron enviro 6ix Nylon 6). On the CRI Website I can see that this line did attain the Plus certification. After speaking with the president and owner of Bloomsburg Carpet, I was informed that after the testing was complete, the certification was awarded in early August of 2007, about the same time the carpet was being installed on our project. He also mentioned that the manufacturing process has not changed in the slightest from the time our carpet was manufactured to the point of certification. Does the time gap that occurred between the carpet being manufactured and the point of certification exclude us from attaining this point, even if the manufacturing process has not changed? Back up from the manufacturing company can be provided at your request." "In this circumstance, the carpet will be allowed with proper credit support documentation including: 1) Confirmation showing the CRI Plus certification for the Bloomsburg Tuva Symmetry carpet. 2) A letter from the manufacturer showing that the manufacturing process of the carpet installed on the project has not changed from the time of manufacture to point of CRI Plus certification. 3) Documentation that the CRI Plus test results are no more than 2 years old at the time of submission." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5155" "2008-09-15" "Existing Buildings" "Our project is an electronics manufacturing facility. In order to reduce the impact to indoor air quality and improve the working environment of the employees, we are in the process of switching to more IAQ friendly building-related products such as carpet, paints, coating, sealants, etc, which helps us pursue MRc3. Further more, during the manufacturing process we have reduced VOCs as much as we can without affecting product quality. We also have procedures and policies in place to continually strive for further reductions as they become available, and have the correct engineering controls to prevent air contamination inside the building. Although LEED does not directly address process-related materials and substances, we think these are the proper things to do in order to provide a better environment for the building occupants. However, at this point, we do use several products that contain VOCs (conformal coating and solvents mostly) but we have significantly reduced VOC amounts (>75%) through chemical substitutions and process eliminations. Those VOCs we do still have are used in areas with proper ventilation (such as fume hoods or inside enclosed and vented equipment) to ensure minimal exposure to employees and immediate venting to the outside of the building. Our 3rd party industrial hygiene survey results prove that the VOC exposure levels for employees are extremely low (" "MRc3 products only address building materials covered by the five MRc3 IAQ compliant sustainability criteria that are used for building improvements, including but not limited upgrades, retrofits, renovations or modifications, inside the building. Manufacturing process-related materials are not addressed by LEED-EB MRc3. Significantly reduced manufacturing process-related VOC amounts through chemical substitutions and process eliminations would best be documented through a LEED-EBv2.0 innovation credit. Innovation points may be awarded for programs or actions that provide additional environmental benefits beyond those already addressed by the LEED-EB credits and prerequisites. Documentation submittals must include a narrative that includes at a minimum: 1. A complete description of the strategy and/or achievement that fully defines the extra sustainability operations & maintenance practices taken by the project team. 2. A clear explanation of the additional environmental benefits delivered by the measure over the performance period and how the team\'s actions caused them to occur. 3. A definition of the performance metrics that quantify the extra environmental benefits, and the corresponding amount of benefits delivered over the performance period because of the team\'s actions. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5241" "2009-06-26" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "How does a project team classify duct sealants for application under EQc4.1?" "Project teams may classify duct sealants under ""Other"", as listed in the SCAQMD VOC Limits table. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5399" "2009-07-31" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "We have specified Forbo linoleum for 100% of the finished flooring in a residential building-except in the areas where we have specified inert ceramic and glass tiles-with the intention of reducing indoor air contaminants as far as possible. Forbo linoleum flooring is regularly tested by an independent accredited and approved lab for compliance with the State of California Standard that is published as Section 01350 Section 9 by the Collaborative for High Performance Schools. Forbo has chosen to focus on standards developed by independent organizations utilizing an American National Standards Institute-accredited consensus process rather than seek trade organization certifications, such as CRI Green Label Plus or FloorScore. The Potential Technologies and Strategies section of EQ credit 4.3 states: select products that are either certified under the [CRI] Green Label Plus program or for which testing has been done by qualified independent laboratories in accordance with the appropriate requirements. We request that the USGBC allow an alternative compliance path for low emitting flooring systems that defines ""appropriate requirements"" as the State of California Standard published as Section 01350 Section 9 by the Collaborative for High Performance Schools. This will give us the opportunity to achieve the EQc4.3 credit requirements, because all of the applicable flooring specified for this project has been tested and complies with the stringent requirements of Section 01350. We believe that compliance with Section 01350 meets the credit intent, because: - Section 01350 requires that products meet the Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, which is referenced in the credit as the Testing Criteria, - Section 01350 is the basis of CRI Green Label Plus and FloorScore, and - Option 2 for the Low-Emitting Materials-Flooring Systems in LEED Reference Guide for Green Building Design and Construction 2009 Edition requires that all flooring elements meet the testing and product requirements of the Section 01350 testing criteria (the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers). If this project was registered under LEED2009, it would meet the credit requirements." "Yes, the testing and product requirements of the California Department of Health Services (DHS) Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda, can be used as an alternative compliance path for flooring for this specific project. Please note that per LEED-NC v2.2 EQc4.3 CIR ruling dated 10/17/2006, 100% of the non-carpet finished flooring must meet the credit requirements, and it must comprise, at minimum, at least 25% of the finished floor area. Potential examples of unfinished flooring include floors in mechanical rooms, electrical rooms, and elevator service rooms. . Further, the California DHS Standard Practice contains two modeling scenarios: a classroom and a private office. To meet the requirements of the LEED-NC EQc4.3, the results must be compliant when modeled to the office scenario." "None" "None"