Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "10078" "2005-09-21" "Commercial Interiors" "Our project is a renovation of the third floor in a university medical laboratory building. Approximately 50 percent of our 16,438 sq ft project consists of laboratory space (i.e. lab benches, study carrels, microscope rooms, etc). The rest of the space contains restrooms, kitchen, storage, equipment space and office space (including designated offices and conference rooms). Study carrels are located along the NE window wall with lab benches extending into the room, perpendicular to the window wall. The laboratory lighting within 5\'- 0"" of the windows, for the carrels, is on a daylight sensing system, as is the lighting for all other regularly occupied non-lab spaces with windows. The institutional research lab space lighting requirement is for a constant 80 footcandles average horizontal illuminance at the lab bench when in use. Therefore, the interior lab lighting, starting 6\'-0"" from the windows, is not operated on the daylight sensing system but is controlled by the occupancy sensing system. Is this acceptable to meet LEED-CI EQc6.1?" "This credit requires that lighting controls be provided for at least 90% of the occupants and all shared multi-occupant spaces. If the research lab space requires a constant 80 fc at the lab bench, without the opportunity for individual adjustment, then the requirements of the credit are not met. However, laboratory projects have special considerations that will be addressed in the LEED-NC Application Guide for Labs currently under development. Until that document is available, as part of the LEED application for certification, project teams should provide additional information and justification concerning the needs of the occupants and the alternatives means of addressing the credit\'s intent. Special circumstances will be evaluated on their merits. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1512" "2006-09-19" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "The new Household Materials Collection and Training Center will serve the needs of many city residents with it\'s bi-parti building program. Located in a former animal incinerator facility, the structure incorporates a green vegetative screen and roof systems, a solar wall for heating the training facility, the maximization of natural daylighting through skylights and sensors, as well as the reuse of existing insulated metal panels removed from the building. The first or Southern half of the building will include a workforce Training Center to teach ex-offenders practical job skills. This half of the building regularly occupied spaces include a classroom, offices, and a training floor. For these spaces, operable windows and lighting controls servicing the perimeter areas of the rooms have been specified in attempts to meet or exceed the EQc6.1 and EQc8.1 requirements. The training room will utilize the group multi-occupant spaces definition as noted in CIR 0098-EQc6.1-120904 for LEED-NC v2.1 projects. In addition, existing skylights will be utilized to increase the natural daylight exposed to the interior of the building. The second or Northern half of the building includes the Household Materials Recycling Facility, which will give city residents a place to properly dispose of their household hazardous waste: paint, batteries, oil, pesticides, etc. In addition, cell phones, computers, etc. will be accepted for recycling. This portion of the project consists of three spaces - an outdoor yard for hazardous waste storage enclosures, as well as two indoors spaces - Collection/Process area and a materials storage Warehouse area. The Warehouse area, separated from the Collections area by a four hour fire wall, will be used mainly to store bundled materials prior to shipping and is not open to the public. The Collections/Processing area will be typically open to the public one day and two afternoons (equivalent of 2 full time days) a week. During the hours the Collections/Processing area will be open to the public, the two sets of double doors and two industrial garage doors will be opened to the exterior, signaling the facility\'s ""open"" status. These openings will allow access to the Collections/Processing area for the public to drop off of materials, as well as allowing employees to move materials around and out of the Collections/Processing area and to the exterior. The doors are to be open at all times of year in all weather conditions, when the facility is open and running. Due to the rough nature of the facility and the fire resistive requirements by building code for this hazardous portion of the building, windows are prohibited in the Collections/Processing area. Overhead lighting for this area will be controlled by wall mounted switches under a 200 sqft average coverage zone. Request: Interpretation of LEED 2.1 NC Credit IEQ 6.1 pertaining to ""regularly occupied space"" is requested here. Although an industrial (also possibly hazardous) building has been interpreted in CIR IEQc8.1-092403, should it be interpreted in a similar method for IEQc6.1 calculations? CIR 0098-EQc6.1-110901 does suggest some degree of interpretation for areas deemed regularly occupied, but it is not specific enough for our building type/use. We believe that in this case, the regular operation of large, overhead doors as a source for natural light and ventilation is an acceptable substitution for windows. However, our exact situation is presently beyond the scope of current definitions and interpretations. Please confirm if our situation will fulfill the requirements of this credit." "If documentation of official operations policy is provided stating the following, the Collections/Processing area may be excluded from the ""regularly occupied spaces"": 1. The Collections/Processing area will indeed be open to the public only for one day and two afternoons a week AND 2. None of the employees will be ""stationed"" in this space; apart from visits to move materials around and out of the Collections/Processing area." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1524" "2006-06-16" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "The LEED controllability credits (EQc6.1 and 6.2) are based on the number of ""workstation locations intended for individual use"". Our project is a grocery store and the Owner is considering providing a higher level of lighting and temperature controls than is typical, in order to increase the comfort of individual occupants. We would like clarification on which areas should be counted as a ""workstation"" in a grocery store setting in order to obtain the LEED controllability credits. For our project, we believe that all cash registers should be counted as workstations since individual occupants will remain at these areas for extended periods of time. Our project also has a ""wine expert"" counter and ""event planning"" counter. These two spaces will also have individual occupants in the same small area for extended periods of time, so we believe these two areas are workstations. We believe the food prep areas (deli, bakery, meat department, produce workroom, etc.) should be treated as shared multi-occupant spaces by LEED. There shouldn\'t be any workstations counted in these spaces. In these spaces, there are several employees that all share several different stations (i.e. in the deli there will be multiple employees that shuffle back and forth between the same counter and meat slicer). We also do not believe there are any areas in the aisles that should count as workstations. These also seem to be shared multi-occupant type spaces. There are also several back of house offices, and it seems fairly obvious which areas qualify as workstations in these spaces. If we count the cash registers, wine expert and event planning counter as workstations, and treat the food prep areas and aisles as shared multi-occupant spaces in our LEED controllability calculations, could we be eligible for the controllability credits? Or are there other spaces in a grocery store setting that should be counted as workstations?" "The proposed strategy is a very reasonable method for demonstrating credit compliance, and thus acceptable. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1650" "2006-12-15" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "(Project is registered under NC 2.1 but will submit this credit according to the requirements of NC 2.2 through LEED Online) Our project is the new construction of a 47,000 ft2 4-story recreation/office building to serve as a community center for the Washington, DC Parks and Recreation department. The program consists of an indoor gymnasium and stage, multipurpose room, arcade, computer training room, offices, classrooms, weight and exercise room, and locker room facilities. Our lighting control strategy is to maximize energy efficiency while providing a suitable level of individual task lighting control for user workstations. The design solution is to offer dual purpose occupancy/ daylight sensors in multi-occupancy spaces, individual task lighting control for 90% of users in open and private offices, and multiple levels of switching in the gymnasium and stage. We are requesting an interpretation for the requirement to provide lighting system controllability for all shared multi-occupant spaces to enable lighting adjustment that meets group needs and preferences. The multi-occupant spaces in our project consist of a gymnasium, a multipurpose room, classrooms, and a weight and exercise room. With the exception of the gymnasium, each of these spaces is less than 2,500 square feet and is provided with at least 4 separate lighting controls as stated in LEED-NC Version 2.1 (Occupancy sensor, Daylight sensor). The occupancy sensor turns the lights on when it senses motion in the room while the daylight sensor keeps the lights from turning on if there is enough daylight. Two of these spaces, a computer training room, and an arcade, are located at the building interior. The controls are the same, but the daylight sensor function will be cancelled due to the lack of daylight in these spaces. The multi-purpose room has an additional level of lighting to accommodate special lighting needs that would require more flexibility. Thy gymnasium is 5800sf and the lighting design for this space is divided into 4 lighting zones, each zone provided with dedicated dual switching. Each light fixture includes two ballasts that are controlled by the dual switches. This space is therefore provided with a total of 8 lighting controls. Will this strategy meet the lighting control requirements for multi-occupant spaces? If it will not, what additional features need to be added to meet the minimum requirements?" "(Ruling per NCv2.2) The described approach to meeting the requirement for multi-occupant spaces appears to be satisfactory to achieve the credit, but additional information will be required in your submittal to confirm the design intent. You list the number of controls per room but do not relate these controls to the anticipated needs and preferences of the occupants in all cases. In your submittal, list the types of each control provided and provide a narrative to describe how the controls match the functionality of the room. For example, describe how the switches/sensors in the computer training room create different lighting levels in that room to support the different operating modes. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1692" "2007-05-23" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "Our project consists of the construction of a mixed-use building, predominantly residential to be located in a downtown area. There is a tower portion of the building, which is flanked on the south and east sides by mid-rise townhome suites. Five levels of underground parking will be located beneath the tower, with a typical floor area of about 34,500 ft2. The intent of this credit is to provide a high level of lighting system control, in both individual levels, and in multi-occupant spaces. Specifically, the requirements are to provide controls for 90% of occupants for individual tasks, and controllability for shared multi-occupant spaces. As the majority of the building is of a residential nature, we propose the following definitions for equivalency. Regularly occupied spaces would be deemed as living rooms or dining rooms, and would be equipped with switches and dimming. Workstations would be deemed as kitchens and bathrooms, and would be equipped with switches, dimming, and point lighting for tasks. Non-regularly occupied spaces would be deemed as bedrooms and hallways, with switching only. With these designations, would our lighting control design would satisfy the requirements of the credit?" "*NOTE* 10/13/2007: The EQ TAG has revised the definition of ""regularly occupied space"" in residential applications. The definition to be amended in the LEED-NC reference guide is as follows: REGULARLY OCCUPIED SPACES --- Areas where workers are seated or standing as they work inside a building; in residential applications it refers to all spaces except closets or other storage areas, utility rooms, and bathrooms. (Bedrooms, living rooms, TV rooms, dining rooms, kitchens, media rooms, etc. would all be considered ""regularly occupied"" in residential applications.) --- Original ruling: Based on the residential nature of the project, the room designations, as described, would not satisfy the credit requirements. In residential type projects, regularly occupied spaces would most likely include bedrooms, living rooms, dining rooms, offices/study, den, etc. Non-regularly occupied spaces would include, bathrooms, storage, laundry room, kitchens and equipment rooms, etc. Depending on the size of the space, dining and living rooms could be defined as a multi-occupant space, while the other spaces, i.e. bedrooms, offices, could be considered an individual type space. To support credit compliance, a description of the individual spaces and their respective functions would need to accompany the calculations and LEED Submittal Template." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1696" "2007-03-15" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our project is an Equestrian Center comprised of an office facility, two (2) onsite staff residences, boarding stables, equipment and hay storage building, a manure compactor/dumpster containment building ,a covered round riding pen, and a covered riding Arena for shows in addition to fenced grazing pastures. We would appreciate some validation of proposed IEQ interpretations of the specialty areas. 1) The naturally ventilated Equipment, hay, and manure dumpster/compactor storage buildings are isolated in their location (i.e. not connected to habitable spaces), are not regularly occupied / habitable and therefore not applicable for the IEQ credits, with the exception of IEQc4.1 - 4.4. We intend to exclude these square footages when calculating the remaining IEQ credits. 2) The naturally ventilated stables are connected to the Office/Residential components. They are, essentially the horse residences and staff occupy the areas regularly. We intend to exclude the central aisle, wash, tack, and feed stalls as ancillary areas, calculating the Veterinarian, boarding, and lesson stalls as ""private offices"" as they will only accommodate a horse and two (2) human occupants comfortably (approximately 150 sq ft each ) and will not function as ""multi-occupant spaces"" regularly. We would apply the appropriate IEQ credits to these areas. 3) The naturally ventilated Covered Round riding pen is open on all sides and has no walls. We would interpret this area as an outdoor facility, thus not being applicable to any of the IEQ credits. 4) The naturally ventilated Covered Riding Arena is open on all sides with the exception of public restrooms. We would interpret this area as an outdoor facility, thus not being applicable to any of the IEQ credits. Please confirm/clarify the following: A) For general USGBC future reference, please define ""indoors."" Is it based on percentage of wall to fenestration opening? Please confirm that the stables would be considered ""indoors"" as they have walls and secured points of entry, although they are naturally ventilated and have no glazing at the stall window openings, only solid hinged shutters for security and inclement weather. We are currently planning to include these areas in the IEQc4.1-4.4, IEQc6.1, IEQc8.1, & IEQc8.2 credits. However, we intended to exclude them from IEQc3.2 and IEQc5.0 as they do not seem realistically applicable. B) Per CIR dated 04/19/2004, animal holding areas within a building are not exempt from daylight (and Views) requirements. However, we propose that the horse stalls would not need to comply with IEQc6.1 adjustable task lighting requirements as the horses do not perform ""visually critical"" tasks. However, overhead lighting will be provided for the staff/human occupants within the stables to supplement day-lighting as required in a ""multi-occupant"" application. Is this an acceptable approach?" "Per several CIR Rulings under EQc4, requirements apply to products installed onsite and within the moisture barrier. The requirements for EQc6 & EQc8 are not based on indoor space, but rather regularly occupied areas. The requirements for EQc3.2 & EQc5 are not appropriate for open-air stables and these spaces can be excluded by providing a descriptive narrative. If a person is likely to cumulatively spend a large part of their workday in the horse stables performing critical visual tasks, then these areas are considered regularly occupied and must address this person\'s need for a quality space. If the productivity, comfort or well being of occupants is positively impacted by task lighting, then the EQc6.1 requirements must be met. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1726" "2007-04-09" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Our project, registered under LEED NC2.1, is a day care facility serving the staff and students of the nearby University of Texas at Austin Campus. As such, the regular occupants of the classrooms are children of such young age as to be incapable of operating heating or ventilation controls and arguably most are not even aware of the ability to do so. Compliance with credit EQ6.1 would be achieved on this project were it not for the required ventilation and heating controls required because the classrooms are considered multi-occupant spaces. We propose that a more proper classification of these spaces be determined by using the standard perimeter and non-perimeter calculations as only the staff in each room will be capable of adjusting the temperature and airflow controls on behalf of the students regardless of the configuration of such systems. Credit Interpretations for other credits have often allowed the consideration of staff in lieu of building occupants in calculations (ie: for number of bicycles in credit SS4.2) when building users are not in direct control of building systems, and we feel a similar argument can be made here. Is it acceptable to calculate the compliance of EQ6.1 as described above considering the unique circumstance that the very young age of the classroom occupants prevents them from using required controls should they be provided?" "Credit EQ6.1 applies specifically to perimeter spaces, which are defined in the LEED Version 2.1 Reference Guide language within this credit. The credit is based on the room area, and not on the number or type of occupants. The only ventilation and heating control requirement is to provide at least one operable window per 200 sqft floor area. To receive Credit EQ6.1 you must provide 1 operable window and 1 lighting control per 200 sqft floor area. Additional multi-occupant ventilation and heating control requirements are part of a separate credit, EQ6.2 and apply to non-perimeter spaces only. For EQ6.2, the spaces in question would qualify as multi-occupant spaces, per the definition in LEED v2.1 Reference Guide. These multi-occupant spaces are required to have control for each space, not for each occupant. For multi-occupant space thermal and ventilation control requirements under credit EQ6.2, refer to LEED v2.1 Reference Guide language for this credit. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2145" "2008-08-05" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "The project team is supplying individual desktop thermal units that provide supplemental warm or cool air according to the individual\'s desires. The units supplied will be Herman Miller\'s C2 System, and will be provided for at least 50% of building occupants in our project. In order to meet the intent EQc6.2, per the LEED-CI reference guide, to ""provide a high level of thermal and ventilation control for individual occupants to promote the productivity, comfort and wellbeing of building occupants,"" the project team has implemented several thermal and ventilation control strategies. As part of the building design process, the office renovation project used the existing HVAC system to provide adequate airflow according to the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004. Additionally, the thermal comfort factors included in ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 were reviewed in the design phase. These factors included temperature, humidity, and radiant temperature. Finally, individual control over thermal comfort was included with the incorporation of the C2 System. As ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 indicates, individuals may desire temperatures +/-3 degrees Fahrenheit from the HVAC set point depending on clothing, activity levels or individual preference. In order to fulfill the credit requirement to provide at least 50% of occupants with individual control over temperature and ventilation, the project occupants were provided with the C2 System personal, portable, electronic climate control devices as part of the design strategy. Another option considered was to configure additional ducting, VAV boxes, and thermostat controls to extend the existing HVAC system, but this was determined by the project team to be less energy efficient, more costly to install and maintain, and less adaptable to individual comfort and changeable furniture configurations. In the reference guide and previous CIRs, it is stated that individual controls need be hardwired to the building system. The project team would like to suggest that projects be allowed to account for non-hardwired thermal units when pursuing EQc6.2, as is allowed in the requirements for EQc6.1. In the cases of both task lighting and thermal comfort, providing individual controls leads to increased occupant comfort and consequently improved satisfaction and productivity. The provision of personal controls also reduces occupants\' reliance on building systems to meet their individual comfort needs. This clarification will allow project teams following the LEED for Commercial Interiors rating system to accommodate for individual occupant needs in instances where they have limited or no control over the existing building systems beyond their tenant space, as well as in situations where furniture configurations and occupant usage patterns make it advisable to give occupants more flexibility to reposition the units as needed. The project team has also invested in TuffLock padlocks, Herman Miller\'s standard recommendation for the C2 System. With addition of the security cable, the portable system can be tethered to a desktop unit. Additionally, the project team has created a program that will require that at least 50% of the tenant space occupants be provided a C2 System. The program will verify on a monthly basis that the units are accounted for. It is the purpose of the program to identify any lost or stolen C2 Systems. It is our opinion that the C2 System provides individual control over the comfort factors included in ASHRAE Standard 55-2004 while meeting the intent of credit EQ 6.2. We would ask for confirmation that this design solution meets the credit requirements." "The project team is asking whether providing non-hardwired thermal control units (i.e. desktop fans, heaters, or coolers) to at least 50% of the space occupants would meet the requirements of EQc6.2. The intent of this credit is to encourage project teams to design integrated controls that will allow for reaping the long term benefits of occupant satisfaction and productivity. The approach described above will be acceptable in tenant improvement of retrofit projects only if it can be shown clearly that the building ventilation system is incapable of allowing the level of controllability required by this credit. This provision is meant to accommodate Commercial Interiors projects, where the project team has limited or no control over the existing building systems beyond their tenant space. In all other cases, the project team is required to provide adequate controls integrated in the building ventilation design or operable windows, to show compliance with the requirements of this credit. Therefore the approach described above would not be acceptable for other rating systems. This ruling is consistent with previous CIR rulings. Applicable Internationally. " "5120, 100000766" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2219" "2008-08-13" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Schools - New Construction" "For a new 312,000 sf building seeking both LEED CS and LEED CI certifications we plan to comply with the requirements of LEED CI EQ Cr 6.1 to provide lighting controls for both individual and group occupants. We believe however that providing task lights for approximately 1800 employees in workstations when they may not be needed contradicts our sustainability goals. These fixtures, if not needed, only add to the project\'s overall embodied energy and environmental impact. The design team has been very aggressive in providing a task oriented lighting scheme that is efficient and beautiful. The design places direct/indirect fixtures with a large percentage of down light directly over the primary work surfaces to provide optimal foot-candles where they are needed. Of the 1870 employees in the building, 97% of them will be in workstations with partitions at 42"". Because of the low partitions, the only option for providing lighting control is a movable task light. The owner has chosen an LED task light. In order to meet the projects overall sustainability goals while meeting the intent of the credit we propose surveying occupants prior to occupancy as to whether they will want a task light. Those who responded in the affirmative will have a task light upon occupancy. The owner will conduct a post occupancy survey to see if additional employees require a task light or don\'t need the one they have. At any point an employee will be able to request a task light. If 100% of employees request a task light the owner will provide them. Providing the task light as an option gives users the ability to control lighting levels while meeting the owner and LEED\'s overall sustainability goals. Please verify that surveying employees pre-and post-occupancy about task lighting preferences and then providing task lights only to employees in open office areas who desire them meets the requirements of LEED CI EQ Cr 6.1." "The inquiry is stating the following approach as an alternative compliance path to meet the requirements of EQc6.1: 1) Survey all future occupants in advance of occupancy to identify those who desire a task light then provide a light upon move-in, 2) Survey all occupants post-occupancy to identify any persons who desire a task light then provide a light, and 3) Commit to making task lights available to all employees who request them at anytime. A survey based approach will meet the requirements only if 90% or more of the respondents request a task light and are provided with the equipment. The described situation makes a very strong case for decreasing environmental impact in not requiring the potentially unnecessary acquisition of products that may not be used by building occupants. The project team should explore credits in other categories of LEED for this strategy, as the elements outlined above may help in achievement of other points. Please note that task-ambient lighting systems that provide low levels of ambient light supplemented with additional task lights have the ability to reduce energy, reduce environmental impact by avoiding installation of excessive ambient light fixtures that provide task illuminance. The intent of EQc6.1 is that the occupants be given individual control to change their light levels to suit their needs. A survey based approach makes the user aware of their needs at the time of the survey only, it does not give them control over their lights unless they respond in the survey that they need a tasklight.\n **Update October 1, 2013: Applicable credits have been updated." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "231" "2001-06-26" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our team has selected to provide operable windows and light controls to achieve this credit. Our building skin is a repeating pattern of precast concrete panels and a glass curtainwall system. The building will house an open office work environment. Currently we have ?x? operable windows spaced 1? apart on the north and south elevation and 2? apart on the east and west elevations. It appears that the number of windows might be lower than specified however the large size windows exceed the normal operable office window. The intent of the goal appears to be achieved although we would like to assure that the requirements of the credit do not keep the project from earning this point. If quantity of windows is truly the issue our fenestration pattern dictates that the most cost effective place to add operable windows would be directly on top of those already in the design or simply break the ?x? window into two \'x? windows. Neither of these strategies appears to change the intent but would bring us within the credit guidelines. Also, our design team would like to confirm whether corridor space in an open office environment is considered a ""regularly occupied area"". There is a 6\' circulation path along the entire building perimeter that does not contain any work or meeting areas." "The intent of the credit is to provide a high level of occupant control at the perimeter of the building. The requirement results in an operable window at about every 13 feet along the exterior wall. As described, the project does not provide this level of functionality with operable windows occurring at roughly half the expected frequency. The number individual zones is then also about half the expected frequency, so the intent is not met. If the circulation zone is within the open office environment, then it is not a corridor. It is considered part of the regularly occupied area by LEED. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2310" "2008-09-23" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "Our project is a multifamily residential building and we would like to verify our approach in meeting the requirements of credit EQ C6.1. Based on the CIR ruling dated 1/29/2008, by providing on/off controls for fixed lighting installed in spaces for individual use (kitchens, bedrooms) and shared multi-occupant spaces, this credit can be achieved. However, it is not clear if providing switched wall receptacles is an acceptable control measure for spaces with no fixed (permanent) lighting installed and hence our query. Our approach to the credit is outlined below 1) For the residential unit bedrooms, kitchen and dining rooms, fixed lighting will be installed, serving the needs of those spaces. On/off controls for the light fixtures will be provided. 2) In addition, the bedrooms will also have switched wall receptacles for the convenience of the tenants individual lighting needs. 3) The living rooms will not have any fixed lighting installed. A switched wall receptacle, allowing the tenant to choose their own light fixture, gives the tenant controllability of the light with an on/off switch. We believe that the intent of the credit to provide \'controllability\' of light is met, even if the actual light fixture is not permanently installed. 4) The living room will also have a junction box for a future fan or ceiling light, at the discretion of the tenant with a separate wall switch to control the fan and light independently. 5) The clubhouse area which can be regarded as a shared multi-occupant space will have occupancy sensors for lighting and also on/off switches for manual over ride. Please confirm that the above approach is acceptable." "The applicant is requesting clarification regarding the use of switched receptacles in residential applications to satisfy the credit requirements. The proposed approach appears to satisfy the credit intent. The LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide states that task lights do not need to be permanently wired and ideally allow the occupant to reposition the lighting fixture. This guidance is also applicable to group multi-occupant residential spaces. The living room, which is not equipped with fixed lighting, has been provided two separate controls: switched receptacles for non-fixed lighting fixtures and a junction box and lighting controls for a possible future fixture. The installation of switched receptacles provides occupants with another level of lighting control. In addition, all of the other spaces have been provided with fixed lighting that satisfies the requirements outlined in the 1/29/2008 CIR. When applying for this credit, the project team should also provide documentation to confirm that a sufficient number of lighting fixtures to provide the required space lighting have been connected to the proposed controls for group multi-occupant spaces.\n\n **Update October 1, 2013: Applicable credits have been updated." "5140" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2491" "2009-02-24" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors" "General: In the retail sales environment, do sales and customer service stations require task lighting per CI 2.0, Credit 6.1? In our specific project, we have a Sales and Customer Service Area, comprising about 70 percent of the store area. In these areas, we have 13 sales and customer service stations, which are stand up countertops with computer stations. These stations are grouped in three areas, with up to five stations adjacent to each other. The stations are 30"" wide, built of modular cabinetry (See plan in Documents Section). It is the intent of the Retailer that these stations are only utilized while making the final sale. The majority of the time these sales and customer support employees will be on the Sales floor assisting customers, whether this be demonstrating phones, working at touch screen stations involved with client billing, reviewing services plans, etc. The back-of-house area comprise approximately 30 percent of the store area. This area contains the operations and technical support personnel and the sales and inventory managers. The operations and technical support personnel are seated at work counters, with individually controllable under counter task lighting. Each of the managers have switchable ceiling lighting as well as task lighting. As an alternative, could each group of sales and customer service stations have a switch controlling a set of lights directly overhead each group of sales and customer service stations?" "The project is requesting if a group occupant control of the lighting is acceptable to meet the requirements of the credit. The stations described above appear to not be considered regularly occupied individual occupant spaces, because they are not stations where people will be working on individual tasks. Rather the space described above appears to be a group occupant space where people move about the floor and interact with customers in a group setting. Therefore, the strategy proposed, should meet the requirements of the credit by allowing group occupant controls over the lighting. For certification, along with required credit documentation, the project team should provide a narrative describing that the sales and service stations are controls the occupants are given over the lighting. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2533" "2009-03-25" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "The Five Points Residential Mental Health Unit is a combination 60 inmate cell and treatment/therapy facility. We are interested in earning EQ Credit 6.1 Controllability of Systems: Lighting. The office support and administrative areas of the building will all have individual lighting controls to meet individual needs and preferences of occupants. Classrooms and group therapy rooms will minimally be provided with two levels of lighting to meet individual group needs. Our question in meeting the requirements of this credit is in reference to the inmate cell areas. Each individual cell, which houses one inmate, will have their own individual lighting controls for a ceiling fixture and a fixture over the hand washing sink. During the hours of 6:00am to 10:00pm, the inmates will have full control of the lighting in their cell. At approximately 10:00pm, an automatic control system will turn off all cell lighting except for a night light in each cell. The lights will be off until 6:00am. Eight of the sixty cells will be provided with 24 hour inmate controlled override controls. Inmates with special needs would be located in these cells to address specific medical issues. We are requesting an interpretation if this approach will meet the requirements of EQ Credit 6.1." "The applicant is requesting confirmation whether lighting controlled by an automatic timer for inmate cell areas is an acceptable means of satisfying the requirements of EQc6.1. It appears that the proposed approach satisfies the intent of the credit. Individual inmates are provided access to individual lighting controls in order to promote their comfort and well-being. While automatic lighting control is implemented from 10:00 PM to 6:00 AM, the lighting control may actually help mental health patients establish a regular schedule. Additionally, night lights are provided during the automatic light control period. The use of this CIR to demonstrate compliance may not be applicable to other project types and/or scenarios. The award of EQc6.1 will be based on the merits of the submitted documentation during the review. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2624" "2009-07-16" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "We are requesting an interpretation of how to meet this credit in an airline terminal building. The terminal's public spaces serve a large volume of transient occupants (airline passengers), plus a significant number of workers who work in locations that are not able to be served by individual controls, including airline ticket counters, boarding gate podiums, and retail concession stands. However, the terminal also contains a significant number of office spaces for airport and tenant airline staff (airlines rent the office spaces from the airport) that are furnished as typical workstations and where lighting controls can improve the quality of the space for occupants. Office space is approximately 13% of total floor area. Because the usage of the public spaces is similar to that of a retail space in terms of the relationships of transient and regular occupants to control over the space, we propose an alternative compliance path using the standards of LEED for Retail (current ballot draft version). This would require providing lighting controls to 90% of employees in office and administrative spaces, enabling adjustments to suit individual task needs and preferences AND providing lighting system controllability for all shared multi-occupant office and support spaces to enable lighting adjustment that meets group needs and preferences. Please confirm whether this approach would be an acceptable means to meet the intent of the credit for airport terminals and other buildings with large transient public occupancy, retail and retail-like transactional areas, and small but significant office support spaces." "The applicant is requesting confirmation on if the lighting controllability requirements of IEQ Credit 6 under the proposed LEED for Retail for New Construction Rating System can be used in lieu of IEQ Credit 6.1 for an NC v2.2 project based on the retail-like nature of the public space. While this degree of controllability may be more appropriate for the project, it is not considered to be of equivalent stringency in that it only addresses administrative and support spaces. Therefore, the alternative compliance path as proposed is not acceptable. However, an alternative compliance path of IEQ Credit 6 under the proposed LEED for Retail for New Construction Rating System (both lighting and thermal comfort controllability requirements) is acceptable for projects with significant retail space in lieu of the existing IEQ Credit 6.1 requirements. To be eligible for this alternative compliance path, projects must forego eligibility for IEQ Credit 6.2. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5056" "2007-07-02" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our facility is a college science building with personal office spaces, lecture rooms, and laboratories. The question is in reference to the requirement to provide individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of the building occupants. For individual office spaces, does overhead, locally-controlled, multi-level lighting in each individual office meet the requirement to enable adjustment to suit the task needs and preferences?" "The overhead, locally-controlled, multi-level lighting in each individual office meets the definition of individual lighting control as long as the lighting designer declares that this design enables adjustment to suit task needs and preferences. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5071" "2007-10-22" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "We request a clarification of the term ""building occupant"" used in the description of both credit EQ 6.1 and 6.2 and a confirmation that point awards can be anticipated. The library design accommodates lighting and HVAV controllability for all building full time employees. Transient occupants, visitors and part time employees/volunteers who typically will occupy open browsing, reading, and circulation areas, are not able to control lighting or HVAC as those systems are typically controlled by the building management system. The management system has been designed to adjust the lighting given daylight levels in the spaces (daylight harvesting) and have automatic shut off when there is no occupancy. The thermostats for those public areas are controlled by a building management. Providing full public controllability in these spaces would undermine the energy saving goals of the system. If building occupant is limited to full time employees, the criteria for EQ 6.1 and 6.2 have been exceeded as follows: Individual hi and lo lighting control has been in all single occupant offices, conference rooms and collaboration rooms. Task lighting control is provided in all offices. Lighting control is provided for 100% of building full time employees. Variable air volume control units have been provided for all single occupant offices, conference rooms and collaboration rooms. Operable windows have been provided in all offices and conference rooms. HVAC control has been provided for 100% of building full time employees." "The CIR is requesting clarification on the definition of building occupants, as pertaining to EQc6.1 & EQc6.2. The determining factor is not WHO uses the space, but HOW the space is being used. It is not sufficient to ignore the needs of transient/visitors to a building and to provide lighting and thermal controls only to full time employees. (The credit requires individual control for occupants, not just FTE\'s). Instead, th e expected building use should be analyzed and control systems should be provided to serve all users as appropriate. As a guideline of typical library uses, we can look at the likely classifications of public areas in a library: 1) lobbies and circulation: these areas are defined as not being ""regularly occupied"" and therefore not required to have individual control 2) book shelf ""stacks"" areas: depending on use and function, these areas would not typically be classified as ""regularly occupied"" 3) reading/work areas: these areas are not dissimilar to an open office environment, and depending on use and function, would typically be considered ""regularly occupied"". System designers should apply reasonable discretion and be prepared to support the decisions they make regarding these classifications of space. In a library setting some of the patrons will likely spend long periods of time inside at specific spaces, and will be performing tasks (reading, writing) that are similar to those of workers or employees. Spaces that serve these functions should meet the requirements of EQc6.1& EQc6.2, regardless of whether they are intended for staff or library visitors. The implementation of these credits is left to the discretion of the designers, though for building types that do not ""neatly"" fit the credit as written in the reference guide, a description of the individual spaces and their respective functions should accompany the calculations and LEED Submittal Template to support the design decisions. Please note that the quantity of individual workstation and shared multi-occupant spaces must be consistent between the credits." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5101" "2008-01-18" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our project is a 173,569 SF manufacturing development with a projected labor force of 450 employees. The facility will include a 71,522 SF Manufacturing Floor, with 74,426 SF of Warehouse, and 15,749 SF of Administrative and Employee Service Areas. The facility will be staffed and producing food products on a 24 hour per day basis, 365 days per year. The facility\'s food manufacturing operations will require a 3-shift per day staffing with approximately 120 employees per shift (80% of total employees) working on the manufacturing floor and/or supporting the manufacturing operation in warehousing, maintenance, and sanitation. The tasks performed in the manufacturing operation and in support of the manufacturing operation by their intrinsic nature are not suited for controllable task lighting or for adjustable shared lighting, primarily because of the personal mobility required for operating the process machinery, sorting, packaging, and transporting the finished products. Additionally, food safety requirements as well as personal employee safety constraints require that these areas be well lighted at all times. In your 10/22/2007 CIR ruling for this credit, it was stated that the determining factor in defining ""Building Occupants,"" ""is not WHO uses the space, but HOW the space is being used."" In this building, 80% of the total employee count will be engaged in physical, labor intensive tasks in areas comprising 84% of the project building area, which for safety reasons must be performed in consistently well illuminated areas. Controllable task lighting, or or for adjustable shared lighting in these areas would be additional lighting and counter-productive to the intent of the LEED Program. For these reasons, we would like to propose that this manufacturing floor area, the receiving warehouse, and the shipping warehouse, not be considered regularly occupied spaces for the purposes of this credit. We suggest this because it would be unreasonable and a safety hazard to meet the intent of the credit in these area\'s. The project design will provide controllable task lighting for the 20% of employees included in the various levels of management and administrative staff who are provided with individual work stations. Additionally, employee support areas for training and scheduled work break area will be provided with controllable lighting functionality. So please confirm this interpretation: 1. The manufacturing floor area, the receiving warehouse, and the shipping warehouse, will not be considered regularly occupied spaces for the purposes of this credit. 2. Assuming you affirm the first interpretation, please confirm the following. We will give the 20% of occupants with workstations task lighting, and the other 80% of occupants will be accounted for by providing all other (not including spaces warehouse/shipping/receiving) regularly occupied shared spaces with adjustable lighting to meet group needs. Thus, we will have accounted for 100% of the occupants. Please confirm." "Manufacturing floor, warehouse, and shipping/receiving spaces that are, in fact, regularly occupied must be considered regularly occupied for the purpose of this credit. Per LEED-NC 2.2 Reference Guide, page 359, work groups ""should have access to adequate controls to provide the functionality to suit their activities."" The referenced CIR dated 10/22/07 also states that ""the expected building use should be analyzed and control systems should be provided to serve all users as appropriate."" If functional or safety requirements do not allow for occupant control in majority of the spaces with 80% of the occupants, then those spaces, and by consequence, this building, does not meet the intent or the requirements of the credit. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5104" "2008-01-29" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "The Reference Guide states, on page 357, that EQ credit 6.1 requires provision of (1) ""individual lighting controls for 90% (minimum) of the building occupants to enable adjustments to suit individual task needs and preferences"" AND (2) ""lighting system controllability for all shared, multi-occupant spaces to enable adjustment that meets group needs and preferences."" On the following page under Calculations, requirement (1) is interpreted to mean that 90% of people occupying ""workstation locations intended for individual use"" must have ""task lighting that enables adjustment to suit individual task needs"" (on/off at minimum). We struggle to interpret these requirements for multifamily residential units where task lighting is usually provided by the future tenant/owner, and where spaces don\'t easily fall into the categories of ""workstation locations intended for individual use"" or ""shared multi-occupant."" Although the term ""regularly occupied"" is never mentioned in the relevant sections of the Reference Guide, several CIR rulings have established that the requirements of EQc6.1 and EQc6.2 apply only to ""regularly occupied"" spaces (3/15/07 and 10/22/07), and that, for residential units, ""regularly occupied"" spaces refers to ""all spaces except closets or other storage areas, utility rooms, and bathrooms"" (5/23/07). Please clarify the following for regularly occupied spaces in multifamily residential units: 1) For a space that could be considered ""intended for individual use"" (e.g. a kitchen or bedroom), assuming the fixed lighting serving this space has been designed to meet the intended needs of the space, does providing on/off control of the fixed lighting meet requirement (1) above? 2) If not, does providing an additional wall receptacle intended for task lighting or providing dimming controls for the fixed lighting meet this requirement? 3) For a space that could be considered ""shared multi-occupant"" (e.g. a large space for group activity such as eating or entertainment), assuming the fixed lighting serving this space has been designed to meet the intended needs of the space, does providing on/off control for the fixed lighting meet requirement (2) above? 4) If not, does providing additional wall receptacles intended for task lighting (one for each expected occupant) or providing dimming controls for the fixed lighting meet this requirement?" "Typical on/off controls in regularly occupied spaces will meet the intent of this credit for multi-family residential projects. Specifically, 1. YES, on/off controls meet the intent of this credit. 2. Not applicable, since 1 is a Yes. 3. YES, on/off controls meet the intent of this credit. 4. Not applicable, since 3 is a Yes." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5120" "2008-06-09" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "The intent of credit EQ 6.2, as stated in the LEED-CI reference guide, is to ""provide a high level of thermal and ventilation control for individual occupants to promote the productivity, comfort and wellbeing of building occupants"". Our office renovation project uses the existing HVAC system to provide adequate airflow and temperature control to meet ASHRAE standards 62.1-2004 and 55-2004. Comfort factors included in standard 55-2004 and reviewed during the design phase included space temperature, humidity, and radiant temperature. As standard 55-2004 and other studies point out, individuals may desire temperatures +/-3 degrees Fahrenheit from the HVAC set point depending on clothing, activity levels or individual preference. To fulfill the credit requirement of providing at least 50% of occupants with individual control of temperature and ventilation, the project occupants were provided personal, portable, electronic climate control devices. The personal climate control device provides warm or cool air by means of a solid-state thermo-electric device (also known as a Peltier device) that produces cold on one side and warm on the other when a DC voltage is applied. Air is forced over each side of the thermo-electric device to deliver warm air and exhaust cool air from the backside, with temperatures ranging from 65 to 102 degrees Fahrenheit, assuming an ambient air temperature of 72. By reversing polarity of the DC voltage, the hot and cold sides are reversed, and cool replaces warm to the front while warm air exhausted from the back. The device is not a high temperature resistance heater, nor is it an air conditioner; it consumes only 60 watts, and does not get so hot that it could be a safety hazard. Recipient surveys of 119 occupants in the project area reported 55% satisfaction with the temperature of their space prior to receiving the personal climate control devices, and 73% satisfaction after using the devices for three months. Recipients indicated they found both heating and cooling valuable to adjusting their thermal environments to their needs. Since occupants could choose either heating or cooling, the design team decided that the unit needed to be portable, rather than being permanently mounted. The portable nature allows occupants to place the units where they have the most need, an important feature that enhances individual control of their personal environment. When the user survey asked if portability was important, 76% responded that being able to move the device to fit their personal needs was indeed important. The intent of credits EQ 6.1 and 6.2, individual controllability, is to provide a high level of individual control and adjustability to occupants. Credit EQ 6.1, controllability of lighting, specifically states that task lights need not be hard-wired. This logic would appear to be similarly applicable to a personal climate control device to allow optimal placement by the occupant. Based on the intent of the controllability credits, we believe that personal climate control devices meet the intent of credit EQ 6.2 and ask for confirmation that this design solution meets the credit intent." "Yes, a personal climate control device, which is not hard-wired, meets the intent of the credit. Applicable Internationally." "2145, 100000766" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5138" "2008-09-15" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our building has stacking glass walls on the south face of all floors. East walls of the first floor retail spaces have the same type of openings. The areas of these openings range from 90 sf to 400 sf when are they completely open. Where installed, these openings make up at least 75% of the entire wall area. We would like an equivalency for counting those areas toward the operable window requirement of IEQc6.1. We propose that the area of a standard window is 6 square feet. We request an allowance to account for 1 window for every 8 square feet of stacking glass. For example, a 90 sf stacking glass wall would equal 11.25 operable windows. Please confirm that this calculation method is acceptable." "The applicant is requesting an equivalency calculation between wall openings and operable windows. It is not clear from the description what types of openings are included in the ""stacking glass walls"". Typical retail spaces only have doors that may be held open when the climate is conducive to do so. If the only openings in the wall are primarily for entry and exit, the requested equivalency cannot be accepted. An operable window has a primary function to provide a user controllable and adjustable opening to maintain user required conditions in the space. A door does not have that type of primary function and does not qualify for the credit. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5143" "2008-08-13" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "Our project is a 197,850 square foot jail that houses maximum security/special management inmates. The inmates that end up at this facility have proven by their actions that they cannot be controlled in a lower risk environment. At this facility, an inmate gives up more freedoms that he or she may have had at a lower risk facility. This includes control of his or her indoor environment. Giving the inmates either thermal or lighting control would hinder operations for the jail staff. From a practical standpoint, there are reasons why individual environmental controls should not be provided in a maximum security jail. Currently, there are no vandal resistant thermal controls on the market. A thermostat in an inmate\'s cell would likely be destroyed in a few hours. Regarding vandal-resistant lighting controls, there are a few available on the market, but none are truly vandal proof. Inmates could potentially endanger themselves and others by tampering with the light switch in their cell. Though the 432 inmate cells/beds at this facility, including medical inmate cells, are regularly occupied spaces and comprise 23% of the total building area, we ask that these spaces be excluded from both EQ Credit 6.1 and 6.2 for the following reasons: 1.) Thermal and lighting controls within an inmate cell would be highly susceptible to abuse 2.) Electric devices such as light switches could be potentially dangerous for the inmate and others. 3.) Inmates having access to thermal and lighting controls would interfere with jail operations. Within all staff areas, we would provide the lighting and thermal comfort controls required to achieve both EQ Credit 6.1 and 6.2." "No, the area described above, about 23% of the total area, cannot be excluded from the requirements of the project for this maximum security jail. Based on project type, not all credits are applicable to all projects. In this case, as occupant control of lighting does not meet the program requirements of the project, it appears that this credit is not applicable. [Note that this LEED Interpretation is also available under IEQc6.1: Controllability of Systems. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X"