Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "10031" "2011-05-09" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "EAc4: On-site and Off-Site Renewable Energy" "Are Ecoenergy labeled electricity products applicable for LEED EB O&M EA credit 4: Renewable energy? " "Ecoenergy-labeled electricity products can qualify for EAc4 provided that equivalency with Green-e certification is demonstrated by the project team. The Green-e standard is located on their website: http://wee.green-e.org" "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10162" "2012-04-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare, Data centers - New Construction, Hospitality - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Retail - Commercial Interiors" "EAc6: Green Power" "If a project receives an allotment of REC credits from a larger corporation in the required amount and states that the REC credits will not be counted towards or used for any other project within the corporation`s portfolio, will this meet the credit requirements? If yes, what if any additional submittal requirements are necessary to illustrate the intent of the credit has been met?" "The project is requesting that REC\'s purchased from a larger corporation meet the credit requirements on a single project. Yes, this approach is acceptable given that the project has purchased Green-e accredited Tradable Renewable Certificates (RECs) equal to at least 35% (or 50% for LEED-CI projects) of the predicted annual electrical consumption for the project building over a 2-year period. In addition to the standard submittal requirements, a statement in the form of an email or letter from the building portfolio owner should be provided confirming that that the REC credits will not be counted towards or used for any other project within the corporation`s portfolio." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10219" "2012-07-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Healthcare" "EAc6: Green Power" "Regarding LEED BD&C EAc6: As the cost of renewable energy sources (PV, in particular) continues to drop, the number of projects able to pursue a site net zero energy goal will continue to increase. The final estimation of electricity consumption for EAc1, Optimize Energy Performance, includes the impact of renewable energy determined through EAc2, On-Site Renewable Energy. The credit language for EAc6 indicates that the annual electricity consumption is to be determined from the results of EAc1 or CBECS. Based on this language, it would appear that a net zero energy project would not need to purchase any renewable energy credits (i.e. green power) to achieve EAc6. If a project was 99% better than ASHRAE 90.1-2007 as determined for EAc1, the green power purchase required would be clear, albeit very small. EAc6 seems to conflict with facilities wanting to increase their energy performance to net zero. Please clarify this credit to support projects seeking net zero. " "The applicant is asking whether EA Credit 6 - Green Power, and by extension, EAc6 exemplary performance, may be automatically awarded for projects that are designed to be net-zero in terms of average annual energy use without the purchase of green power or renewable energy credits. \nYes. If the project produces 100% or more of its electricity as on-site generated renewable electricity, as documented in EAc2 - On-site Renewable Energy, the project is eligible to earn EAc6 and one Innovation in Design point for Exemplary Performance in Green Power. However, for any project that is connected to the electric utility grid, the following requirements apply to ensure that the project meets the credit intent if the project does not achieve net-zero performance once built:\n1. If a Green-e certified or equivalent utility program is available to the project in the project location, then the project team must provide a 2-year contract or Owner\'s letter of Commitment indicating that the project will commit to a 2-year enrollment period in the program for at least 35% of the provided electrical energy for EA Credit 6, or 70% of the provided electrical energy for Exemplary Performance in Green Power.\n2. If a Green-e certified or equivalent utility program is not available to the project in the project location, then the project team must provide a letter of commitment signed by the Owner or Owner\'s representative confirming:\na. That a Green-e certified or equivalent utility program is not available to the project.\nb. That the project will review the purchased annual energy consumption for the first two years of occupancy, and will commit to purchase RECs to offset 35% of the purchased electrical consumption for EA Credit 6, or 70% of the provided electrical consumption for Exemplary Performance in Green Power. " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1611" "2006-11-06" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "EAc6: Green Power" "LEED Energy and Atmosphere Green Power Credit Interpretation Request A CIR Ruling dated November 2003, allows the portion of Seattle City Light\'s Low Impact Hydropower Institute (LIHI) certified electrical production to be credited towards satisfying the requirements of LEED-NC v2.1 EA Credit 6.0 Green Power. Since May 2003 when the Skagit Hydropower Project received LIHI certification, Seattle City Light began offering green tags to all retail customers through its Green Up program. Customers have the option to purchase a portion or all of their electricity supply from the Stateline Wind Power Project. Stateline began producing electricity in December 2001. Seattle City Light would now like to provide one renewable power program to LEED and other retail electrical customers that combines the portion of generation certified through LIHI, with the balance of renewable power provided with Seattle City Light green tags, in order to allow projects to meet the requirements needed to satisfy the Green Power Credits available across all LEED products. To define the portion of LIHI provided generation, the following table shows the annual contributions of the LIHI certified Skagit Hydroelectric Project (Gorge, Diablo and Ross facilities), total annual generation, annual averages, and three year averages for the first three years of LIHI certification. (Read in table format) MWH | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 3 Year Average (Headings) Ross MWh | 673,558 | 674,640 | 465,810 | 604,669 Gorge MWh | 854,491 | 855,132 | 644,060 | 784,561 Diablo MWh | 736,778 | 737,626 | 542,715 | 672,373 Total LIHI Certified MWh | 2,264,827 | 2,267,398 | 1,652,585 | 2,061,603 Total Seattle City Light MWh | 9,440,301 | 9,561,757 | 9,711,154 | 9,571,071 Percentage LIHI | 23.99% | 23.71% | 17.02% | 21.54% City Light proposes that LEED Green Power credits within the Seattle City Light service area can be satisfied through a two year contract with Seattle City Light in which 21.54% of the renewable energy requirement is met by LIHI certified power from the Skagit Hydropower Project and the balance provided by green tags from the Stateline Wind Project." "[Updated 12/21/2006] The applicant is requesting qualification of a Low Impact Hydropower Institute (LIHI) certified power for EAc6, Green Power. Renewable energy power sources are defined by the Center for Resource Solutions Green-e program. The proposed combination will be categorized as a Competitive Electricity and Utility Green Pricing Product. To demonstrate compliance with credit requirements any power supplied should demonstrate equivalence with the section IV of the Green-e Renewable Electricity Certification Program National Standard Version 1.3, as well as with all the requirements of CIR ruling dated 11/4/2002." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1743" "2007-03-28" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "EAc4: Green Power" "The project owner wishes to purchase a green power product that is not Green-e certified, but is asserted to comply with the technical aspects of the standard. How do we document equivalence?" "Using a formal third-party verification program is not required, but projects are required to document to USGBC that their renewable supplier has 1) met the Green-e criteria, and 2) properly accounted for the eligible renewable resources sold. This documentation to USGBC must include some type of meaningful verification work performed by a qualified, disinterested third party. Example documentation methods to USGBC that meet this requirement include: a) providing a state-mandated power disclosure label from the renewable supplier in states with meaningful regulatory requirements for renewable energy disclosure and accounting practices, as well as meaningful penalties for violations; b) providing a green power scorecard or rating from a credible, independent entity that performs meaningful verification of green power characteristics and accounting practices. In either case projects must confirm that the third-party entity\'s regulatory or verification programs are meaningful, summarizing those programs to USGBC as part of their certification application and highlighting any auditing or other independent checks the program performs. Other documentation methods will be considered on a case-by-case basis. This ruling applies to all the LEED Rating Systems having a similar ""green power"" credit. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1744" "2007-03-28" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "EAc6: Green Power" "What is required in order to document equivalence with Green-e certified power" "Using a formal third-party verification program is not required, but projects are required to document to USGBC that their renewable supplier has 1) met the Green-e criteria, and 2) properly accounted for the eligible renewable resources sold. This documentation to USGBC must include some type of meaningful verification work performed by a qualified, disinterested third party. Example documentation methods to USGBC that meet this requirement include: a) providing a state-mandated power disclosure label from the renewable supplier in states with meaningful regulatory requirements for renewable energy disclosure and accounting practices, as well as meaningful penalties for violations; b) providing a green power scorecard or rating from a credible, independent entity that performs meaningful verification of green power characteristics and accounting practices. In either case projects must confirm that the third-party entity\'s regulatory or verification programs are meaningful, summarizing those programs to USGBC as part of their certification application and highlighting any auditing or other independent checks the program performs. Other documentation methods will be considered on a case-by-case basis. This ruling applies to all the LEED Rating Systems having a similar ""green power"" credit. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2119" "2008-10-03" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "EAc6: Green Power" "Energy and Atmosphere Credit 6 - Green Power requires energy from renewable sources, defining renewable sources by the Centre for Resource Solutions Green E products certification requirements. In Canada, the CAGBC uses the Ecologo certification from Environment Canada Environmental Choice program for certification of their Green Power credit. This project which is located in Canada, is using the USGBC Core and Shell as there is no Core and Shell through the Canadian Green Building Council as of yet. While Green E certification exists in a small amount of Canadian distributors, most of the Canadian market uses Ecologo. In order to pursue the Green Power credit through the USGBC can the Ecologo certification be used in place of the Green E certification requirements? Will the submittal of the Ecologo certification replace the need to prove equivalency with the Green E certification requirements?" "The project team is asking if its renewable energy certified by Ecologo will comply with the credit requirements for its project located in Canada. If the renewable energy is not Green-e certified, then the project team must prove equivalency to the Green-e technical requirements or pursue certification through LEED Canada. Applicable Internationally; Canada. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2172" "2008-05-28" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction" "EAc6: Green Power" "See below for treatment of District Thermal Energy systems in LEED-NCv2.2, LEED-CSv2.0, LEED-Schools, and LEED-CIv2.0." "USGBC has developed a document that clarifies how district or campus heating or cooling systems are to be treated in all Energy and Atmosphere prerequisites and credits for LEED-NC, LEED-CS, LEED-Schools, and SSc1, Options K & L under LEED-CI. That document is available for download from the LEED Reference Documents page, here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=4176. All LEED-NC, LEED-CS, LEED-Schools, and LEED-CI projects involving district or campus heating or cooling systems that registered for LEED after this posting date must follow that guidance, and such projects that registered before this date may optionally follow that guidance." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2183" "2008-05-28" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "EAc6: Green Power" "See below for treatment of District Thermal Energy systems in LEED-NCv2.2, LEED-CSv2.0, and LEED-CIv2.0." "USGBC has developed a document that clarifies how district or campus heating or cooling systems are to be treated in all Energy and Atmosphere prerequisites and credits for LEED-NC, LEED-CS, and SSc1, Options K & L under LEED-CI. That document is available for download from the LEED Reference Documents page, here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=4176. All LEED-NC, LEED-CS, and LEED-CI projects involving district or campus heating or cooling systems that registered for LEED after this posting date must follow that guidance, and such projects that registered before this date may optionally follow that guidance." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2186" "2008-05-29" "Schools - New Construction" "EAc6: Green Power" "Exemplary Performance for EAc6" "Exemplary performance is available for this credit. The requirements are double that of the requirements for one credit, ie, purchase 70% of the building\'s electricity from renewable sources by engaging in a two year energy contract OR purchase 35% of the building\'s electricity from renewable sources by engaging in a four year energy contract. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2203" "2008-06-04" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction" "EAc6: Green Power" "See below for treatment of District Thermal Energy systems in LEED-NCv2.2, LEED-CSv2.0, LEED-Schools, and LEED-CIv2.0." "USGBC has developed a document that clarifies how district or campus heating or cooling systems are to be treated in all Energy and Atmosphere prerequisites and credits for LEED-NC, LEED-CS, LEED-Schools, and SSc1, Options K & L under LEED-CI. That document is available for download from the LEED Reference Documents page, here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=4176. All LEED-NC, LEED-CS, LEED-Schools, and LEED-CI projects involving district or campus heating or cooling systems that registered for LEED after this posting date must follow that guidance, and such projects that registered before this date may optionally follow that guidance." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2382" "2009-02-03" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction" "EAc6: Green Power" "Our project is a science and technology laboratory building in the city of Port St. Lucie, Florida. An Energy Cost Budget calculation has been done for the project to meet the requirements of EA Prerequisite 2 - Minimum Energy Performance. The project is not seeking EA Credit 1-Optimize Energy Performance. Under the LEED Reference Guide EA Credit 1 ""a model using the Energy Cost Budget method will NOT be accepted for credit under EA credit 1"", therefore it won\'t be accepted for EA Credit 6. The alternate methodology is to use the DOE-CBECS survey. Laboratory buildings are part of the \'other\' category with a median rate of 13.8 kWh/square foot. It has been our experience that a building functioning as a laboratory uses significantly more electricity per square foot. In a CIR ruling on 2-04-2008 under LEED EB, it reads, An alternative approach for your laboratory building would be to use the Energy Benchmarking Tool available through Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), which is a resource co-sponsored by the EPA and DOE for the design, construction, and operation of laboratories. The Energy Benchmarking Tool can be found here: http://www.labs21century.gov/toolkit/benchmarking.htm. Using the metrics provided by the tool, calculate your project\'s percent reduction in energy use compared to the benchmark. You can then calculate the corresponding number of LEED points. Because this project does not currently fall into a benchmark region in the Labs for the 21st Century\'s Energy Benchmarking Tool, an electricity rate of 40.1 kWh/square foot as determined by the aforementioned tool has been recommended. If this methodology is not acceptable to the USGBC, please advise on a desired approach to estimating energy used for laboratories." "The project team is requesting clarification regarding the methodology for determining the electric energy consumption of a laboratory building in order to determine the amount of green power to purchase for the project. The project has completed an Energy Cost Budget model (Chapter 11), but has not completed a Performance Rating Model (Appendix G). The project team should use the proposed case electric energy reported for the Energy Cost Budget modeling method. Per ASHRAE Energy Cost Budget method modeling requirements, all systems and process energy should be reflected in the model. Therefore, the proposed case model results should be very similar (if not identical) to those reported for Appendix G. Therefore, it is acceptable to use the Proposed Case Model from the Energy Cost Budget Method to reflect total building energy performance for EA Credit 6. It does not appear that sufficient information is available in the Labs for 21st Century Energy Benchmarking Tool to provide a valid determination of building energy consumption for this project. As indicated by the project team, the project does not currently fall into a benchmark region in the Energy Benchmarking Tool, and at the date of this CIR Ruling, only 131 laboratory buildings were included in the benchmarking database nationwide. Since there are no buildings benchmarked in the location where this project is located and since there is such a small subset of buildings nationwide, it is not acceptable to use this tool as a measure of total building energy consumption for this project. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "415" "2002-11-04" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "EAc6: Green Power" "ENERGY & ATMOSPHERE: Green Power (EA Credit 6.0) Credit Interpretation Request Washington State does not require electric utilities to provide retail open-access. The Seattle Justice is required to purchase electrical power from the local municipal utility, Seattle City Light. Seattle City Light (SCL) wants to prove a LEED electrical energy product that qualifies for the EA Credit 6.0 to any LEED project within SCL\'s service area and proposes the following approach: Seattle City Light estimates that the current resource mix includes 25-28% renewable generation as defined by Green-e, composed of low impact hydro and possibly wind and other renewables. The utility will certify the low impact hydro component, estimated at 25% of the total mix, through the Low Impact Hydropower Institute. SCL will assist projects to ""green up"" the remaining 25% balance in order to achieve 50% renewable energy content by facilitating the purchase of Green Tags for participating LEED projects. Projects may elect to purchase green tags from existing or new renewable resources from SCL, the Bonneville Power Administration or other providers of green tags. As a part of the Credit documentation, the Seattle Justice Center will write a letter attesting that the mix or renewables serving the LEED project meets the following criteria: 1. SCL supplied renewable power plus Green Tags are equal to 50% of the project\'s energy consumption. 2. The energy and green tag sources meet the Green-e definition of renewable energy, which includes wind, solar, low impact hydro, methane recovery, etc., and, 3. Green Tags purchased have not been double sold, as verified by contract or purchase agreement." "Per LEED Interpretation 0214-EAc60-122101, if Green-e rated power is not available in the project\'s region, other sources of green power may be eligible for consideration. The alternative source must satisfy the criteria of the Green-e program, which is detailed on page 163 of the LEED Reference Guide (formatted version of June 2001). Of the five listed criteria, one is based on renewable content of 50% of more. The alternative energy source must also meet the other four criteria. If the SCL product contains 25% low impact hydropower, certifies its low impact hydro power through the Low Impact Hydropower Institute, as required in the Green-e program, AND meets the other Green-e criteria, SCL energy could be considered \'equivalent\' to half of the green power benefit associated with Green-e products. The rest of the green power benefit would need to be purchased in the form of Green Tags for half of the building load. In summary, in order to achieve a Green Power credit for SCL product the following is required: 1. SCL must certify its low impact hydropower with the Low Impact Hydropower Institute. 2. SCL must write a letter stating what percentage of its product is comprised of renewable energy (including certified low impact hydropower). 3. SCL product must also confirm that the remaining green-e criteria are met (addressing emissions, \'new renewable\' power and nuclear power) and state this in their letter. 4. The project must purchase Green Tags to meet the difference between SCL\'s product renewable % and green-e renewable content of 50%. (i.e.. if SCL contains 25% renewable content, this meets half the requirement and Green Tags would be required for the equivalent of half the building load over two years to meet the other half of the requirement.) Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5249" "2007-02-07" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell" "EAc6: Green Power" "The project building is a naturally ventilated building that does not have a mechanical air handling system. For the EAc1 submittal ASHRAE 90.1-1999 requires that the building be modeled with air-conditioning, even though there is no air-conditioning equipment. EAc6 requires that the green power purchase contract be based on the DEC"" value provided in the EAc1 submittal. In the case of naturally ventilated buildings, it seems unreasonable to be required to purchase green power for equipment that is not installed. We propose that for this project, a naturally ventilated building without air handling equipment, the green power purchase contract should be based on an adjusted value equal to the DEC"" value minus the cooling energy use of the building, as obtained from the energy simulation summary output. If a Green Power purchase contract, that meets the requirements of EAc6, is based on the adjusted DEC"" then the modeled net electricity use for the building will be provided by grid-source, renewable energy technologies on a net zero pollution basis, meeting the intent of the credit to: ""Encourage the development and use of grid-source, renewable energy technologies on a net zero pollution basis."" As ASHRAE 90.1 is not written for naturally ventilated buildings we feel that it is of paramount importance to avoid penalizing naturally ventilated buildings that are consuming considerably less energy than the conventionally air-conditioned buildings for which ASHRAE 90.1 was written. Is DEC"" minus the cooling energy, as obtained from the energy simulation results, an appropriate baseline amount for the purpose of a green power purchase contract for naturally ventilated buildings without air handling equipment?" "The project is proposing an alternative method for calculating the Green Power requirements for a naturally ventilated building. If an energy simulation is performed for EAc1, then the project team may subtract their simulated cooling energy from the proposed design energy consumption (DEC""). This must be clearly documented in the team\'s submittal. The project team may also calculate Green Power requirements based on one year of actual utility bills. Naturally ventilated projects using the above alternative methods for calculating Green Power requirements must also confirm that no cooling system exists in the building. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "538" "2003-05-05" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "EAc6: Green Power" "APPROACH As a firm representing several projects seeking LEED certification, we respectfully submit the following Credit Interpretation Request (CIR). In an effort to achieve EA Credit 6 (EAc60), our firm performed due diligence and has identified a wholesale provider of Green Power. Although retail renewable electricity certificate (REC) products exist in the marketplace, these products are not optimal for high-volume purchasers. Potential purchasers of high-volumes of Green Power should have the option to choose a wholesale certificate-based transaction. Such transactions provide the high-volume buyer flexibility to choose the type of generation it wishes to support, the market from which Green Power is purchased (regulated or competitive), the location of the generation facilities, transparent price discovery, a choice of fuel-mix, and most importantly, flexible pricing structures. PROPOSED SUBMITTAL ELEMENT An element of LEED Version 2.1 EAc60 requires the submittal of ""a copy of the two-year electric utility purchase contract for power generated from renewable sources."" With respect to the Potential Technologies & Strategies described on page 32 of the LEED Green Building Rating System, it is our position that this Submittal's requirement of an ""electric utility purchase contract"" does not accurately reflect the type of contract, or financial agreement, entered into when utilizing the following certificate-based procurement strategies: a) ""Green-e certified Tradable Renewable Certificates"" b) ""other power supply that meets the Green-e renewable power definition"" Therefore, we request and propose that the following be added or deemed an acceptable EAc60 Submittal: ""a copy of the two-year electric utility purchase OR renewable electricity certificate contract for power generated from renewable sources."" The interim acceptability and/or inclusion of the proposed language, as part of EAc60 Submittals, is significant in that it accurately reflects the financial agreement between owner, tenant or responsible party, and the seller. Currently, the owner, tenant or responsible party can procure Green Power from sources other than an electric utility or power marketer, therefore we feel that the EAc60 Submittals should be adapted to clearly represent the distinction and to facilitate and encourage an open and competitive Green Power market. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION It is our Intent to encourage the development and use of grid-source, renewable energy technologies on a net zero pollution basis through direct payment and/or support to renewable generation facilities. The direct payment will be outlined in a financial agreement between the project owner, tenant or other responsible party and the owner or operator of the renewable generation facility. We intend to employ the services of a wholesale renewable energy broker to facilitate and structure the financial agreement(s) so as to select the least-cost renewable electricity and /or REC provider(s). Our Green Power procurement strategy includes promoting the development of new capacity through the sourcing of renewable electricity certificates in both competitive and regulated electricity markets, with or without the availability of a green pricing program or retail certificate-based products. Moreover, the Requirements set-forth in EAc60 will be met and/or exceeded in a brokered certificate-based Green Power transaction. The wholesale renewable energy broker will provide documentation guaranteeing the renewable generation facility meets and/or exceeds the criteria and requirements set-forth by the Center for Resource Solutions as defined in \'Attachment C: Green-e National Tradable Renewable Certificate (TRC) Standard\' (http://www.green-e.org/pdf/trc_standard.pdf). In addition, the wholesale renewable energy broker will arrange independent, third-party verification to guarantee the renewable electricity was produced and sold as defined in the contract or transaction agreement. Furthermore, a year-end audit will be performed by an independent, third-party accountant verifying that no double counting of renewable generation has occurred. It is our continued position that the proposed language for the EAc60 Submittal Element will promote the growth and development of the renewable energy industry and related sustainable markets. Therefore, we respectfully request that the Project Manager accept the proposed language referenced above and/or grant EAc60 credit to the owner, tenet or responsible party who submits to USGBC a copy of a two-year renewable electricity certificate contract for power generated from renewable sources." "The proposed power resale marketing strategy appears to meet the intent of encouraging the use of grid-source renewable energy, but the description of how this strategy encourages the development of new renewable energy sources is unclear. A project submitting for this credit would need to clearly document that the power purchased under this arrangement meets or exceeds the Green-e Certification requirements. Provision of a ""renewable electricity contract for power generated from renewable sources"" is acceptable provided the contract represents purchase of at least 2 years worth of renewable electricity for 50% for the building's energy load. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10389" "2014-07-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare, Commercial Interiors, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings, Existing Buildings - Recertification" "EAc4:On-site and Off-site Renewable Energy" "The project team is planning on installing a Cogeneration System that will take Biogas and turn it into Electricity to be used wholly on-site. The heat produced by this Cogeneration system will also fully be used on-site to preheat heating hot water and domestic hot water via a heat exchanger and potentially to power an absorption chiller.\n\nThe building will receive the Biogas from a local Biogas provider and plans to enter into at least a 10 year contract with this provider to supply enough Biogas to the building to fully power the planned Cogeneration system. The contract will stipulate both that enough Biogas will be fed into the pipeline to meet required demands of the Cogeneration system and that the Biogas will be metered to prove that the actual amount of Biogas supplied meets the contracted requirements at all times.\n\nThough the Biogas is not being piped exclusively to the site (contractually it is supplied exclusively via project ownership funds), it is transported directly to the site in the existing natural gas pipeline. This approach achieves the exact same net result on the Natural Gas grid as piping Biogas exclusively to the project site in its own dedicated pipeline and allows the project to avoid having to dig up 100s of miles of land and lay a brand new pipeline to the project, something that would have a significantly detrimental effect on the local environment. In an urban environment like where the project is located, there is little or no option to be able to refine and extract Biogas on-site or even very close to a site, so the approach the project team is suggesting is the best and most reasonable alternative.\n\nIs this approach acceptable in accordance with the Reference Guide and Addendum 100001081 (November 1, 2011)?" "Directed Biogas purchase is not considered on-site renewable energy based on the current EAc2 credit requirements, addenda and LEED Interpretations, because the gas consumed on-site is not the same as the biogas that the project purchased. Please note that the referenced Addendum 100001081 does not allow for the fuel used on site to be different than the fuel that was purchased for the project. The referenced addendum applies for situations such as landfill gas piped directly to the project from a nearby landfill, or wood pellets from wood mill residue that are trucked to the project. In either case, it would not be acceptable for the landfill gas or pellets generated from wood mill residue to be ""purchased"" by the project, used in another project, and replaced in the project with natural gas or wood pellets produced from tree tops. Also, note that NREL refers to directed biogas as off-site renewable energy." "10126, 100001081" "None" "X" "X"