Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "10250" "2012-10-01" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Retail - New Construction, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Healthcare" "To comply with CARB, some composite wood manufacturers are switching from urea formaldehyde resins to:a. Melamine urea formaldehyde with urea formaldehyde added as a ""scavenger"" to bond with residual un-bonded formaldehyde molecules attempting to reduce formaldehyde off-gassing. b. Melamine formaldehyde with urea added as a scavenger. These resins are being marketed as ""melamine formaldehyde"" and compliant with LEED\'s no added urea formaldehyde IEQ4.4 credit requirements. While resulting composite wood products made with these resin technologies may be CARB compliant, the question arises as to the use of these resins being compliant with LEED IEQc4.4. Phenol formaldehyde and MDI have long been proven to be the best resin options to urea formaldehyde to prevent formaldehyde off-gassing, so utilizing resins with urea that formulate urea-formaldehyde either prior to going in the end product, or within the end product, seems counter to the intent of this LEED credit. Are melamine urea formaldehyde with added urea formaldehyde acting as a scavenger, and melamine formaldehyde with urea added as a scavenger to bond with loose formaldehyde within a product, acceptable resin technologies considered compliant with LEED EQc4.4?" "Revised ***4/1/2013*** Products using melamine urea formaldehyde (MUF) with added urea formaldehyde acting as a scavenger or melamine formaldehyde with urea added as a scavenger to bond with loose formaldehyde within a product do not automatically meet the credit requirements for IEQ credit 4.4. If the composite wood product using MUF can meet the testing requirements and is found compliant with the California Air Resource Board (CARB) Airborne Toxic Control Measure (ATCM) 93120 requirements for no-added formaldehyde based resins or the requirements for ultra-low-emitting formaldehyde resins (ULEF), the product can contribute to IEQ credit 4.4. Previously, it was unclear how melamine fit within the scope of this credit. This ruling is intended to clarify how to address melamine, not prematurely adopt the LEED v4 credit language for composite wood. Therefore, composite wood products using other amino resins must meet the no added urea-formaldehyde requirements of LEED 2009. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "10251" "2012-10-01" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Healthcare" "Do Thermally Fused Melamine (TFM) laminates fall under the requirements for ""on-site and shop-applied composite wood and agrifiber assemblies?"" \nBecause Thermally Fused Melamine (TFM) is technically a paper product and not a ""plastic"" product, we would appreciate additional clarification whether TFM paper products applied in the manufacturing process fall within the scope of this credit." "No, Thermally Fused Melamine (TFM) laminates do not need to be included in this credit. Laminates are not covered in the scope of this credit. Internationally Applicable." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1837" "2007-07-16" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "We are working on a LEED-CI project that has access to salvaged plywood. The wood is in good condition and would be a shame not to re-use. However, because the wood is old and we do not have access to clear manufacturer\'s data for the product, we cannot ensure that the product is free of added urea-formaldehyde. Given that salvaged wood is excluded from the Certified Wood credit, in order to encourage the sustainable practice of reusing old timber, we are wondering if we could also exclude salvaged composite wood products from the EQc4.4 credit requirements. While this particular project is a LEED-CI project, we feel that the same logic would apply to other ratings systems; thus we\'re also requesting clarification for LEED-NC and LEED-CS projects as well." "The project is inquiring about whether they may exclude reused plywood from EQ credit 4.4. If the product is known to be at least one year old at the time of occupancy, then it may be excluded from EQ credit 4.4 based on the assumption that the majority of urea formaldehyde will have already off-gassed. The project should be prepared to provide sufficient documentation demonstrating that the plywood is at least one year old at the time of occupancy. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2246" "2008-07-10" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Is it possible for LEED for Schools projects to utilize compliance paths in NCv2.2 for EQ Credit 4: Low Emitting Materials?" "A Performance/Intent-Equivalent Alternative Compliance Path (PIEACP) is approved for use by LEED for Schools projects. LEED for Schools Project Teams may substitute LEED for New Construction v2.2 EQc4 Low?Emitting Materials credits in place of corresponding LEED for Schools EQc4 Low?Emitting Materials credits. LEED for Schools project teams are encouraged to use LEED for Schools EQc4 Low?Emitting Materials credits where possible, but may substitute LEED for New Construction v2.2 credit requirements as needed. Project teams can still achieve a maximum of 4 points under EQc4, per a table provided in the URL below. Details can be found here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=4311 Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2399" "2009-03-10" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "Our project is an office building with multiple stores where most of the occupied areas are open spaces. We intend to apply wood-based products in the technical floor (access floor). In accordance with LEED-NC V2.2, wood-based products inside the waterproofing system should not contain any urea-formaldehyde-based resins. This requirement is reasonably supported by the assumption that only the materials inside waterproofing system can have emissions for the interior environment. However if one material is applied inside the waterproofing system but is enclosed inside a waterproofing material, can this be considered out of the scope for this credit? The access floor squares will be made out of a wood particleboard core encapsulated inside an aluminum box and supported on metal supports, to allow the passage of all the cables and wires. This box will then be covered with the surfacing material. The function of the wood-based board is to give the necessary stiffness and bending strength to the whole assembly and, therefore, it will be totally enclosed inside this waterproofing box in order to avoid moisture penetration, what could interfere with the material performance. Therefore, we believe that this wood-based panel application guarantees that no eventual VOC emission can be allowed and, therefore, we\'d like to ask permission to apply this solution in the above mentioned project. In addition, please also note that this board is independently certified as E1 class, which is the class with the lowest level of formaldehyde emissions according with the European Standard EN 13986." "As noted in CIR ruling dated 8/13/2008, all products within the weatherproofing system must not contain any added urea-formaldehyde, regardless of whether the product is encapsulation within a waterproofing system. Please also refer to LEED-NC v2.1 CIR rulings dated 10/18/2004, 6/17/2004 and 5/7/2005 for additional guidance on this. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "3716" "2004-06-17" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "This CIR is posted by USGBC to clarify the scope of products and interior spaces addressed by EQ Credit 4.4 (Low-Emitting Materials: Composite Wood) in LEED-NC Versions 2.0 and 2.1." "The following guidance clarifies the scope of products and interior spaces addressed by EQ Credit 4.4.\n\n1. Essentially, if a product is inside the exterior moisture protection it is a controlled product (it must comply with the credit requirement). To elaborate: all materials that emit contaminants that have the potential to enter the indoor air will be considered as indoor sources of contaminants. Materials which have the potential to communicate their emissions to the indoor air include all indoor surfaces in contact with the indoor air including flooring; walls; ceilings; interior furnishings; suspended ceiling systems and the materials above those suspended ceilings; all ventilation system components in communication with the ventilation supply or return air; and all materials inside of wall cavities, ceiling cavities, floor cavities, or horizontal or vertical chases. As an example these materials include the caulking materials for windows, and insulation in ceilings or walls. Examples of materials that have little or no potential for communicating with the indoor air are those siding and roofing materials that are on the exterior side of the waterproofing membrane.\n2. If a product is a composite wood or agrifiber product, it is a controlled product (e.g. plywood, particleboard, OSB, MDF, strawboard, wheatboard, and similar products). Composite wood components used in assemblies are also controlled (e.g. door cores, panel substrates, plywood sections of I-beams, etc.).\n3. Adhesive used in wood/agrifiber assemblies (veneered panels, composite wood products contained in engineered lumber, door assemblies, etc.) is not controlled but will be in the next version of LEED-NC (v2.2).\n4. A product is controlled if it is part of the base building systems. If it is considered fit-out, furniture or equipment (FF&E) it is not controlled because it is not a base system. Applicable Internationally. \n" "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5141" "2008-08-13" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "This project consists of (2) wings of (3) story wood framed buildings. The wood beams (LVL\'s) do have urea formaldehyde in the glue resins. The wood structure was able to ""off-gas"" for a period of time until building was weather-tight. Is credit still achievable due to the ""off-gassing""? The framing started July 24, 2007 and completed November 15, 2007. The framing was open to the elements for the course of 60-90 days depending on the enclosure period. We believe this is adequate time for the off-gassing cycle. Equally, we have conducted Air Quality testing during construction and have not had excessive VOC content within the building. We are in our final stages of IAQ testing and preliminary reports are coming back successful. Please advise." "In order to meet the credit requirements, all products within the weatherproofing system must not contain any added urea-formaldehyde. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5202" "2009-04-21" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "We are consulting for a 460,000 sqft school in Manhattan, New York City. We would like to obtain the EQc4.4 credit by using composite wood products that are free from added urea-formaldehyde resins. A small fraction of the composite wood on the project consists of veneered paneling that, because if its location in the building, must have a fire-retardant substrate. We are aware of two UF-free fire-retardant panels on the market. One of these products is not approved for use in New York City. The other substrate, which is approved by the New York City Fire Department, has an intumescent fire-retardant coating. Unfortunately, experience has proved that adhesives without added urea formaldehyde do not reliably adhere to this intumescent surface. The manufacturer does not provide a guarantee of attachment if other adhesives are used. While market transformation is occurring, the pace is sometimes not rapid enough to affect such specialty products. We are blocked from obtaining the credit for UF-free composite materials by a small fraction of material that cannot be made UF-free. Even if a compliant substrate were available somewhere, procurement issues may impede sole-sourcing it. With a limited budget, if this credit is not obtainable, the school may have to pursue another credit that it considers less desirable. We request that USGBC consider allowing a small fraction - we suggest 5% - of the composite wood on the project to be exempted from the credit requirement. Not requiring 100% compliance is consistent with other MR and IEQ credits. With the current requirement, even a minute amount of non-compliant material removes the incentive to meet the intent of the credit." "Per CIR ruling dated 8/13/2008 and 3/10/2009, all composite wood products that are contained within the exterior moisture protection barrier of a building must comply with the requirements of this credit. Please also refer to LEED-NC v2.1 CIR rulings dated 10/18/2004, 6/17/2004 and 5/7/2005 for additional guidance on this. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X"