Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "1468" "2006-04-04" "New Construction" "Our LEED-NC 2.1 registered project is an office/laboratory building located on a University campus. A single-axis tracking PV generation system, donated to the University by a local electric utility, will be installed on the campus at an optimum location for collecting solar energy. The value of the energy output of the PV system will equal 20% of the total annual energy cost of the registered LEED project and will be applied for points under credits EAc2 and EAc1. The University will own the system and the electricity, which will be delivered directly into the campus grid. A 12/23/2002 CIR ruling for EAc2 states that if a project owner ""...sells the renewable energy credits...then the project cannot apply the corresponding energy to the calculations for this credit or for EAc1."" The Memorandum of Understanding between the University and the local utility states that ""...the REC\'s that will be associated with the PV system shall be retired."" We are seeking LEED Platinum certification and, consequently, each point is critical. We want to be sure that we execute this properly. Therefore: Can we retire the REC\'s and use the value of the generated energy of this PV system toward EAc2 (and EAc1) points? If so, then will a copy of the signed MOU be sufficient proof that this transaction has taken place? Thank you." "The project is seeking to take credit under EAc1 and EAc2 for a campus grid-tied PV-array. The proposed approach is acceptable. Please refer to EAc2.1 ruling dated 5/24/2004 for further details and submittal requirements. Since this is a campus situation, please also refer to the LEED-NC Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects (AGMBC) for additional guidance.\n\nUpdate April 15, 2011: Please note that all 2009 projects in multiple building situations must follow the 2010 Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and On-Campus Building Projects, located here: https://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=7987. 2009 project teams should check this document for up to date guidance on all multiple building issues. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1485" "2006-05-16" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "This is an EAc2 administrative clarification ruling regarding the sale of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), valuation of on-site renewable energy generation, and separate ownership of the building and the on-site system." "In a previous ruling (EAc2.1 CIR Ruling 12-23-02), it was determined that the sale of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) from an on-site renewable energy system was prohibited if that system received EAc2 points. This ruling is an update and supersedes the previous ruling. This ruling also establishes requirements to be met if the building owner does not also own the on-site renewable energy system. To encourage the greater development of on-site renewable energy systems, the sale of RECs is allowed from an on-site renewable energy system that claims credit under EAc2 if the building owner or energy system owner, either separately or acting together, meet the following conditions: 1. They purchase an equivalent number of RECs equal to 200% of the system\'s annual rated energy output each year from another source, which must be Green-e eligible. The system\'s rated output must reflect all system performance characteristics as well as actual local site conditions (e.g., climate, mounting location and angles, etc.). The rationale for the 1-for-2 ratio is that many states have set Renewable Portfolio Standards and in-state renewable energy targets that can be traded in the form of credits. These in-state RECs are typically more expensive to achieve and typically cost a lot more (e.g. $0.05/kWh for New England wind power vs. $0.01/kWh for RECs from West Texas or Dakotas wind). From an environmental and financial perspective these are not the same for a couple of reasons: a. Emissions reduction impacts other than CO2 are less in remote areas than in the congested areas in state where population is concentrated and where RECs are largely purchased. b. Distant renewable energy generation may be stranded by limited T&D capacity. Given that in-state RECs create more benefits than out-of-state RECs for non-CO2 impact but equal for CO2 impact, it was decided to allow in-state to be replaced by out-of-state on a 1 for 2 basis. This allows green building projects to capture the value of RECs created by on-site renewables while resulting in net reduction of CO2. 2. The seller of the on-site RECs must fully follow all established guidelines for the sale of RECs and not claim any of the environmental attributes for the on-site system. Example: An on-site solar system in New Jersey produces 100,000 solar kWh per year. These RECs may be sold provided the building or solar system owner purchases 200,000 kWh of Green-e eligible RECs to offset the sale of the on-site solar RECs. The offset purchase must occur for every year in which the on-site RECs are sold and are in addition to any RECs purchased to meet EAc6. To determine the value of the energy cost savings in EAc2 compliance calculations, the project team may include both of the following components, each of which must be listed separately in the credit documentation: 1) the cost of the energy no longer purchased from the supplier because of the on-site generation; and 2) the actual and/or fair market value of the RECs sold. If an on-site renewable energy system is owned and operated by an entity other then the building owner, the following must also occur to receive credit under EAc2: 1. There must be at least a 10-year contract for the purchase of the energy output by the building owner. 2. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the energy output. 3. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner, either separately or acting together, must make the 200% offset REC purchase referenced above for at least 10 years. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1495" "2006-05-16" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "This is an EAc2 administrative clarification ruling regarding the sale of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs), valuation of on-site renewable energy generation, and separate ownership of the building and the on-site system." "In a previous ruling (EAc2.1 CIR Ruling 12-23-02), it was determined that the sale of Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) from an on-site renewable energy system was prohibited if that system received EAc2 points. This ruling is an update and supersedes the previous ruling. This ruling also establishes requirements to be met if the building owner does not also own the on-site renewable energy system. To encourage the greater development of on-site renewable energy systems, the sale of RECs is allowed from an on-site renewable energy system that claims credit under EAc2 if the building owner or energy system owner, either separately or acting together, meet the following conditions: 1. They purchase an equivalent number of RECs equal to 200% of the system\'s annual rated energy output each year from another source, which must be Green-e eligible. The system\'s rated output must reflect all system performance characteristics as well as actual local site conditions (e.g., climate, mounting location and angles, etc.). The rationale for the 1-for-2 ratio is that many states have set Renewable Portfolio Standards and in-state renewable energy targets that can be traded in the form of credits. These in-state RECs are typically more expensive to achieve and typically cost a lot more (e.g. $0.05/kWh for New England wind power vs. $0.01/kWh for RECs from West Texas or Dakotas wind). From an environmental and financial perspective these are not the same for a couple of reasons: a. Emissions reduction impacts other than CO2 are less in remote areas than in the congested areas in state where population is concentrated and where RECs are largely purchased. b. Distant renewable energy generation may be stranded by limited T&D capacity. Given that in-state RECs create more benefits than out-of-state RECs for non-CO2 impact but equal for CO2 impact, it was decided to allow in-state to be replaced by out-of-state on a 1 for 2 basis. This allows green building projects to capture the value of RECs created by on-site renewables while resulting in net reduction of CO2. 2. The seller of the on-site RECs must fully follow all established guidelines for the sale of RECs and not claim any of the environmental attributes for the on-site system. Example: An on-site solar system in New Jersey produces 100,000 solar kWh per year. These RECs may be sold provided the building or solar system owner purchases 200,000 kWh of Green-e eligible RECs to offset the sale of the on-site solar RECs. The offset purchase must occur for every year in which the on-site RECs are sold and are in addition to any RECs purchased to meet EAc6. To determine the value of the energy cost savings in EAc2 compliance calculations, the project team may include both of the following components, each of which must be listed separately in the credit documentation: 1) the cost of the energy no longer purchased from the supplier because of the on-site generation; and 2) the actual and/or fair market value of the RECs sold. If an on-site renewable energy system is owned and operated by an entity other then the building owner, the following must also occur to receive credit under EAc2: 1. There must be at least a 10-year contract for the purchase of the energy output by the building owner. 2. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the energy output. 3. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner, either separately or acting together, must make the 200% offset REC purchase referenced above for at least 10 years. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1500" "2006-05-16" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell" "The mechanical systems for this project are geothermal in nature. Water is extracted from a 250\' deep well drilled into quartzite bedrock and extracted at approximately 51" "The system as described in the CIR is a combined passive geothermal heat exchange / ground source heat pump system. Per the v2.1 Reference Guide (pages 155 and 157) these types of systems do not qualify for points under this category because they do not generate energy. In general, environmental heat sources and sinks with a low temperature difference relative to room air conditions are not considered renewable energy sources in EAc2 in LEED-NC v2.1 or v2.2. The energy saving benefits of these types of systems may be applied to EAc1 calculations. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1507" "2006-07-07" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "This is an administrative ruling posted by USGBC updating the definition of qualifying renewable energy. This ruling covers two aspects of that definition." "First, the LEED-NC v2.2Reference Guide First Edition (October 2005) includes a clerical error regarding the eligibility of bio-fuels. Table 3, p. 199 only references electricity production from bio-fuels, whereas it should reference all energy production from bio-fuels. Any energy produced from the eligible fuels qualifies for points in EAc2, and any energy produced from the ineligible fuels does not qualify. Second, LEED-NC v2.2 uses a broader definition of renewable energy compared to v2.1 that provides more flexibility for project teams. This administrative ruling authorizes v2.1 projects to use any of the allowable forms of renewable energy described on pp. 198-199 of the v2.2 Reference Guide. The eligible and ineligible forms of renewable energy are summarized in the following tables: Table 1: EA Credit 2 Eligible On-Site Renewable Energy Systems " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1586" "2006-10-03" "New Construction" "We have reviewed the administrative clarification credit ruling regarding Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) and dated 5/16/2006. It discusses two items: 1. the sale of RECs, valuation of on-site renewable energy generation, and 2. separate ownership of the building and the on-site system. Please confirm that item 2 only applies if item 1 applies. For example: if the renewable system owner retains the REC associated with the power it produces and does not sell or trade the REC then: 1. an on-site renewable energy system may be owned and operated by an entity other than the building owner, and 2. the system does not need to meet the three qualifiers listed at the end of the REC ruling dated 5/16/2006, and 3. the building owner can still receive EA-c1 points, and 4. the building owner can still receive EA-c2 points. In our case, the renewable energy system owner is the local utility. The building owner is committed to long-term on-site renewable energy generation through an agreement with the utility. We believe this situation clearly meets the intent of the credit: to increase the level of on-site renewable energy supply." "Each topic addressed in the CIR ruling dated 5/16/2006 (sale of RECs vs. ownership of the on-site system) is an independent ruling that stands alone. Thus, in the applicant\'s situation, the project needs to demonstrate the following: 1. There is a minimum 10-year contract with the local utility to purchase energy generated by the proposed system. 2. There must be clear documentation for accounting purposes whether the purchase includes the RECs or just the energy output. 3. If the purchase does not include the RECs, the building owner or energy system owner must make the 200% offset REC purchase described in the first portion of the CIR for at least 10 years. The project will be eligible to achieve points under EAc2 and take credit for the system under EAc1, as long as the project can comply with the three points outlined above, and provided that the system meets the requirements of on-site renewable energy sources as per EAc2 administrative CIR ruling dated 7/7/2006. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1842" "2007-07-19" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "This is an administrative ruling posted by USGBC updating the conditions that must be met for a project to take credit for renewable energy under EAc2." "A previous ruling (EAc2.1 CIR Ruling 10-03-2006), defined conditions that must be met for projects to qualify for renewable energy credits under EAc2. This ruling updates the previous ruling defining alternative conditions for projects to qualify for EAc2 renewable energy credits. A project will be eligible to achieve points under EAc2 and qualify for renewable energy credits for the system under EAc1 if the project meets the following conditions: 1 The renewable energy system is installed within the boundaries of the project or on the project site. 2 The renewable energy system is connected immediately adjacent to the utility meter. 3 A 10-year (minimum) contract for on-site generation with the owner of the Energy System is established. 4 The RECs associated with the renewable energy system are not sold. 5 The Energy System owner does not count the RECs associated with the renewable energy system to meet a mandated renewable portfolio standard goal or provides the RECs to the project owner. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "2591" "2009-07-30" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) is using a high quality wood-burning masonry heater to provide about 10% of its building\'s annual energy budget, directly as heat. Remaining heat is provided by an oil-fired hydronic system, supplemented by solar thermal collectors. We are requesting approval of this masonry heater as a renewable heat source for both EA-1x Energy Optimization and EA-2.3 Renewable Energy on the following grounds: The masonry heater serves as an element of research, training and demonstration for clean and renewable wood heat. The masonry heater is used and managed as part of CCHRC\'s research mission and building operations. It is monitored regularly for temperature, weight of wood input and weight of ash output. The masonry heater is fueled once per business day when heating is required. It provides significant heat for the 2 story east end of the building from its location near an open stairway in the building\'s lobby. Wood used at this facility is sustainably harvested in local woodland and grounds management. Firewood is supplied by CCHRC\'s land owner, University of Alaska Fairbanks, from its maintenance and construction clearing operations. In addition, firewood may be cut on nearby designated, managed State land areas after a permit is obtained: http://forestry.alaska.gov/wood/firewood.html Plentiful, regulated forest land areas near this site make firewood a renewable, local energy source which will be available for the life of the building. The standard \'Envirotech\' masonry heater core ( http://www.timelyconstruction.com/index.htm ) has been tested for particulate emissions by Myren Consulting, Inc., an accredited third party testing agency. Average particulate grams per kg. of wood: ASTM Standard Crib Fuel; 0.8193 g/kg., Cord wood: 0.8155 g/kg. These values meet or exceed those for allowable wood pellet stoves, relieving concerns that incomplete or poor combustion can produce pollution; expressed on page 154 of the Version 2.1 Reference Guide. Masonry heaters also have a burn-efficiency similar to that of oil-fired boilers. Most oil-fired boilers can be set to burn at 85-87% efficiency maximum due to the problems inherent in managing oil-emission condensate that occurs when oil is burned at a higher efficiency rate. Masonry heaters similarly burn the wood at around 85% efficiency. However, CCHRC\'s masonry heater is fired only once per day instead of running continuously through the day. Also, data that we have on PM2.5 emissions clearly shows that masonry heaters contribute fewer PM2.5 emissions to the atmosphere than oil-fired boilers. Furthermore, because the Masonry Heater burns so effectively, CCHRC uses less than 2 cords of wood per year. Masonry heaters are approved under LEED for Homes with where potential for \'backdraft\' is minimized and has been documented. The masonry heater in this building meets these requirements. In addition, atmospheric pressure inside the building is monitored by the building automation system, which can notify the building manager in the unlikely event that significant negative pressure occurs. In conclusion, we believe the masonry heater should be credited for this project because its fuel is renewable & low in embodied energy, its particulate emissions are lower than the oil boilers, and its use is carefully measured & managed. It benefits the environment by lowering fossil fuel consumption and carbon footprint." "The project is seeking clarification that the firewood supplied by the land owner as well as wood harvested from a neighboring state forest can be considered as renewable source for EAc2. The project team is using a high quality wood-burning masonry heater. It is acceptable to use forest residue provided it is obtained from a sustainably managed source and harvested from a site that is contiguous to the project site and has the same owner. Provide documentation consisting of a Sustainability Management plan for the local woodland and any permits from state forests. The documentation should also include quantified energy demand and supply relationships. Applicable internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "436" "2002-12-23" "New Construction" "The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Green Office Building will utilize 2.51% renewable energy from photovoltaics collector panels on the roof of the building. The power generated from the PV installation will be used within the building to offset the energy consumption and any surplus energy will be reverse metered. The Center for Resource Solutions (CRS) has a program known as ""green tags which are sold by those investing in the cost of a renewable system to individuals, businesses or other organizations, to help support their financial investment. ""Green Tags"" are the value of the environmental benefits of renewable energy, not the energy itself. DNR would like to sell the Green Tags that this renewable energy will produce. We would like to make certain that participating in the Green Tag program will not negate or effect the calculation for the LEED point for Renewable Energy Credit 2.0. What is a Green Tag? Tradable Renewable Certificates Can Earn Green-e Quality Certification. The Center for Resource Solutions (CRS) has announced that Green-e certification is now available for tradable renewable energy certificates (TRCs)--also known as ""green tags."" TRCs are an innovative market mechanism with potential to greatly expand markets for renewable energy, and the availability of Green-e Certification will improve customer confidence and facilitate rapid, successful growth of these exciting new markets. TRCs certified by Green-e will directly support generation from newly developed renewable energy facilities--facilities that generate electricity from the sun, the wind, the heat of the Earth, low impact hydropower, or organic fuels (biomass). These certificates are created when a renewable energy facility generates electricity. Because the certificates represent all the features of renewable electricity except the electricity itself, they can be marketed as a separate product and sold, traded, or retired anywhere in the country. The part of renewable energy that is not electricity includes a growing list of valuable attributes, including many positive environmental benefits. TRCs bundle these attributes into a single, marketable commodity. TRCs can be sold independently or combined with ""generic"" electricity to provide customers with all the benefits of renewable electricity service. Web site - http://www.resource-solutions.org/Green-epage.htm." "[Please note that this ruling is expanded upon in the ruling dated 5/16/06.] The project cannot both sell the environmental benefit of the renewable power AND claim these benefits for the project. The principle of Green-e TRCs is that only one entity may claim or purchase the environmental benefit of a given unit of renewable energy. In the same vein, if the project sells the environmental benefit of renewable energy generated on-site to others, what remains at the project is only \'electricity\' without an associated environmental benefit. This would mean that the project forgoes its ability to qualify for this credit in order to sell the environmental benefit to someone else. If the DNR sells its renewable energy credits to Green-e, then the project cannot apply the corresponding energy to the calculations for this credit or for EA credit 1." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "10389" "2014-07-01" "New Construction, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction, Retail - New Construction, Healthcare, Commercial Interiors, Retail - Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings, Existing Buildings - Recertification" "The project team is planning on installing a Cogeneration System that will take Biogas and turn it into Electricity to be used wholly on-site. The heat produced by this Cogeneration system will also fully be used on-site to preheat heating hot water and domestic hot water via a heat exchanger and potentially to power an absorption chiller.\n\nThe building will receive the Biogas from a local Biogas provider and plans to enter into at least a 10 year contract with this provider to supply enough Biogas to the building to fully power the planned Cogeneration system. The contract will stipulate both that enough Biogas will be fed into the pipeline to meet required demands of the Cogeneration system and that the Biogas will be metered to prove that the actual amount of Biogas supplied meets the contracted requirements at all times.\n\nThough the Biogas is not being piped exclusively to the site (contractually it is supplied exclusively via project ownership funds), it is transported directly to the site in the existing natural gas pipeline. This approach achieves the exact same net result on the Natural Gas grid as piping Biogas exclusively to the project site in its own dedicated pipeline and allows the project to avoid having to dig up 100s of miles of land and lay a brand new pipeline to the project, something that would have a significantly detrimental effect on the local environment. In an urban environment like where the project is located, there is little or no option to be able to refine and extract Biogas on-site or even very close to a site, so the approach the project team is suggesting is the best and most reasonable alternative.\n\nIs this approach acceptable in accordance with the Reference Guide and Addendum 100001081 (November 1, 2011)?" "Directed Biogas purchase is not considered on-site renewable energy based on the current EAc2 credit requirements, addenda and LEED Interpretations, because the gas consumed on-site is not the same as the biogas that the project purchased. Please note that the referenced Addendum 100001081 does not allow for the fuel used on site to be different than the fuel that was purchased for the project. The referenced addendum applies for situations such as landfill gas piped directly to the project from a nearby landfill, or wood pellets from wood mill residue that are trucked to the project. In either case, it would not be acceptable for the landfill gas or pellets generated from wood mill residue to be ""purchased"" by the project, used in another project, and replaced in the project with natural gas or wood pellets produced from tree tops. Also, note that NREL refers to directed biogas as off-site renewable energy." "10126, 100001081" "None" "X" "X"