Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "10266" "2013-01-01" "Core and Shell, New Construction, Commercial Interiors" "One of our products is a Natural Wool Hand tufted carpet which represents less than 5% of the total carpet area of the entire project. The other flooring is 95% Green Label Plus. The Carpet & Rug Institute doesn\'t test hand tufted carpet, only machine tufted or woven carpets. We have found an independent laboratory that will test our hand tufted carpet following the exact same condition described by the Carpet & Rug Institute. It won\'t achieve Green Label Plus but will be able to demonstrate that the carpet respects all VOC emission defined by the Carpet & Rug Institute & the Green Label Plus. The Carpet & Rug Institute testing regime requires initial, quarterly, and annual testing, however, we only plan to do the initial testing. Will this be sufficient to gain LEED approval?" "No, the proposed approach is not acceptable. In order to demonstrate equivalence through initial testing only, the testing must follow the testing and product requirements of the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda. Applicable Internationally.\n\nNote: this is not applicable for LEED for Schools 2007 or the LEED 2009 rating systems because this option is already included in the rating system language." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1610" "2006-10-17" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell" "In designing a project for LEED certification, we are planning to specify linoleum sheet flooring in areas of the building. We are requesting that a credit be awarded to this project under LEED NC EQ4.3 as the flooring will meet VOC emissions requirements of the FloorScore certification program which has more stringent requirements than those required to receive a credit under the CRI Green Label or Green Label Plus programs. We believe that all flooring materials in a building, not just carpet, should have an opportunity to receive credit for meeting stringent VOC emissions requirements. FloorScore is a voluntary, independent certification program that tests and certifies hard surface flooring and associated products for compliance with criteria adopted in California for indoor air emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) with potential health effects. The program uses a small-scale chamber test protocol and incorporates VOC emissions criteria developed by the California Department of Health Services, which are widely known as Section 1350. The FloorScore program was developed by the Resilient Floor Covering Institute (RFCI) in collaboration with Scientific Certification Systems (SCS) following several years of extensive testing of flooring products produced by resilient flooring manufacturers. The program incorporates California Section 1350 procedures and requirements and adapts them to the certification of flooring products for use in typical buildings. RFCI controls the FloorScore program name and logo. SCS acts as the third-party certifier ensuring program integrity and independence. As part of certification, SCS (1) works with the manufacturer to identify the appropriate samples for testing; (2) reviews VOC emission test reports generated by independent testing laboratories for individual candidate products; (3) determines if the test results meet the California Section 1350 requirements for individual VOCs of concern; and (4) periodically inspects manufacturing plants to review product formulas, processing, and quality control in order to define the permitted use of the FloorScore seal. The basis of the VOC criteria used for FloorScore certification is the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) which has an active program to develop chronic toxicity guidelines for air pollutants. The program uses widely accepted procedures developed by the U.S. EPA and includes extensive peer review and public comment. To date, the program has developed Chronic Reference Exposure Levels (CRELS) for 78 chemical substances. The CRELS are concentrations that assume long-term exposures and include a number of uncertainty factors. These guidelines provide a strong scientific basis for the FloorScore program and are consistent with the intent of EQ 4.3 to ""reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, potentially irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants.""" "Yes, the proposed alternative compliance path using FloorScore is acceptable for credit achievement according to the following stipulations. 100% of the non-carpet finished flooring must be FloorScore-certified (as described above), and it must comprise, at minimum, at least 25% of the finished floor area. Potential examples of unfinished flooring include floors in mechanical rooms, electrical rooms, and elevator service rooms. This ruling was justified by the technical committee\'s evaluation of the technical resources used as basis for the standard (California and USEPA sources), and adequate benefit. This CIR went through an official USGBC process for the establishment of performance/intent-equivalent alternative compliance paths. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1733" "2007-03-22" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "In designing a project for LEED certification, we are planning to specify a hard surface, resilient flooring in areas of the building. We are requesting that a credit be awarded to this project under LEED NC EQc4.3 as the flooring will meet VOC emissions requirements of the GREENGUARD certification programs GREENGUARD and GREENGUARD Children & Schools) which has more stringent requirements than those required to receive a credit under the CRI Green Label or Green Label Plus programs. We believe that all flooring materials in a building, not just carpet, should have an opportunity to receive credit for meeting stringent VOC emissions requirements. The GREENGUARD Certification Program is an industry independent, third-party testing program for low-emitting products and materials. The program uses a small -scale chamber test protocol and incorporates VOC emissions criteria developed by the California Department of Health Services, which are widely known as Section 1350. The GREENGUARD Environmental Institute (GEI) is an industry-independent, non-profit organization that oversees the GREENGUARD Certification Programs. As an ANSI Authorized Standards Developer, GEI establishes acceptable indoor air standards for indoor products, environments and buildings. The GREENGUARD Children & Schools incorporates California Section 1350 procedures and requirements and adapts them to the certification of flooring products for use in typical buildings. As part of certification, GREENGUARD Environmental Institute (1) works with the manufacturer to identify the appropriate samples for testing; (2) reviews VOC emission test reports generated by independent testing laboratories for individual candidate products; (3) determines if the test results meet the GREENGUARD requirements for individual VOCs of concern; (4) inspects manufacturing plants to review product formulas, processing, and quality control, and (5) ensures continuous compliance to the standard with quarterly and annual testing. All products are tested in dynamic environmental chambers following ASTM standards D-5116-97 and D- 6670-01, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency\'s testing protocol for furniture and the State of Washington\'s protocol for interior furnishings and construction materials. Products are measured for emission levels, which must meet the following indoor air concentrations within 5 days of unpacking. Air concentrations are based on the product being in a room 32 m3 in volume with an outdoor air concentration of 0.72 air changes per hour (ACH). Maximum allowable emission levels are those required by the state of Washington\'s indoor air quality program for new construction, the US Environmental Protection Agency\'s procurements specifications, the recommendations from the World Health Organization, California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment and Germany\'s Blue Angel Program. When multiple emission values are recommended, the lesser or more stringent is used as the acceptable emission value for GREENGUARD certification. The California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has an active program to develop chronic toxicity guidelines for air pollutants. To date, the program has developed Chronic Reference Exposure Levels (CRELS) for 78 chemical substances. The CRELS are concentrations that assume long-term exposures and include a number of uncertainty factors. These guidelines provide a strong scientific basis for the GREENGUARD Certification Programs and are consistent with the intent of EQ 4.3 to ""reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, potentially irritating and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants."" The GREENGUARD Environmental Institute has certified over 130,000 products from over 80 manufacturers." "The project is inquiring if it is possible to achieve EQc4.3 through the use of low-emitting hard surface, resilient floors that are Greenguard-certified. As indicated in CIR Ruling 10/16/2006, projects that use non-carpet flooring materials that are FloorScore-certified are eligible to achieve EQc4.3 via a formal alternative compliance path process distinct from a CIR. This process will be initiated for this Greenguard product. This ruling will be updated as necessary when this process is complete. -------------------- CIR UPDATE - 10/19/2009 Flooring products certified under the GREENGUARD Children and Schools Program are approved as an alternate compliance path to Low-Emitting Materials credits related to flooring in LEED rating systems. Compliant products must have achieved GGC&S certification since January 1, 2008. Additional GREENGUARD criteria including total particles, phthalates, and 1/100 TVL, as they are outside the scope of the existing LEED low-emitting flooring credits, are outside the scope of this approval. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5523" "2003-12-01" "New Construction" "CRI is now permitting hard surface flooring products to be tested under its long-standing green label IAQ testing program. Will a point be provided if hard surface flooring is used in a LEED building and passes CRI green label testing?" "New credits and points cannot be added to the LEED Rating System via the Credit Interpretation Process. There is currently no point available for using hard surface flooring that is certified as low-emitting, thus no point will be awarded under EQ credit 4.3. The team may consider applying for an Innovation Credit, provided that comprehensive, quantifiable and significant environmental benefit is documented. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5604" "2005-01-24" "New Construction" "In means of reducing the quantity of odorous or potentially irritating indoor air contaminants in the building, a concrete floor finish has been specified and installed. The intent of this credit is to select low-emitting carpet systems to reduce the quantity of VOCs that are emitted into the building. A concrete floor finish was selected through a conscious effort to avoid the use of carpet, thus eliminating VOCs from the floor finish altogether. There is a consensus amongst the design team that the concrete floor finish better satisfies the intent of this credit. Is it necessary for a low-emitting carpet to be installed in order to achieve this credit? " "Yes, it is necessary to install a low-emitting carpet in order to achieve this credit. The concrete floor can be less harmful than carpet floor if the VOC content of the concrete sealant is carefully selected. The VOC content for concrete sealant is addressed in IEQc4.1. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "811" "2004-06-21" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "This is a USGBC administrative CIR to define the term indoor in the credit\'s Intent section, thus clarifying the scope of the credit." "Essentially, if a product is inside the exterior moisture protection it is a controlled product (it must comply with the credit requirement). To elaborate: all materials that emit contaminants that have the potential to enter the indoor air will be considered as indoor sources of contaminants. Materials which have the potential to communicate their emissions to the indoor air include all indoor surfaces in contact with the indoor air including flooring; walls; ceilings; interior furnishings; suspended ceiling systems and the materials above those suspended ceilings; all ventilation system components in communication with the ventilation supply or return air; and all materials inside of wall cavities, ceiling cavities, floor cavities, or horizontal or vertical chases. As an example these materials include the caulking materials for windows, and insulation in ceilings or walls. Examples of materials that have little or no potential for communicating with the indoor air are those siding and roofing materials that are on the exterior side of the waterproofing membrane. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X"