Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "1725" "2007-04-09" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "Our project is a day care facility serving the staff and students of the nearby University of Texas at Austin Campus. As such our project had a very tight design and construction schedule with a non-negotiable move-in date. The building is currently occupied and in use. Our design and construction team in all good faith undertook to capture both credit EQ3.1 and EQ3.2 through development and implementation of a IAQ management plan during construction and pre-occupancy phases as well as a two week building flush-out at 100% outside air. Activities undertaken included sealing of ductwork, ductwork cleaning, staging of materials, and other practices with the goal of providing optimum indoor air quality for construction workers and building occupants. However, at final documentation it was discovered that the specified and installed filters during construction and flush-out were MERV 7 rather than MERV 8. As the team in all good faith achieved (excepting MERV ratings) all requirements of credits EQ3.1 and EQ3.2, resulting in a much better air quality for the building than industry standards, is it still possible to achieve one or more of these credits? At a minimum, could credit 3.2 be achieved through the alternate testing method if undertaken at a time when the building is unoccupied (ie: on a weekend or holiday period)?" "The design team is seeking to achieve credit for Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 3.1, Construction IAQ Management Plan, During Construction, and Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 3.2, Construction IAQ Management Plan, After Construction/Before Occupancy, having followed all of the required procedures, but unintentionally using MERV 7 filters instead of MERV 8 filters. The use of MERV 8 filters is only required at return grilles if the air handlers are run during construction. MERV ratings are the current standard of measure applied to filtration media by ASHRAE Standard 52.2. A MERV 7 filter has a 50-70% efficiency on a particle size of 3-10" "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1902" "2007-09-18" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "This CIR is submitted in relation to the implementation of LEED NC 2.2 Credit EQ 3.2 as it relates to a Data Center facility. Based upon our review of the existing CIRs there does appear to be a related CIR raised under the NC 2.1 program dated 1/18/2007, however it is not clear as to whether this ruling is applicable to NC 2.2. This previous NC2.1 CIR ruled that when applying the 14,000 ft3 / ft2 alternate approach (which is in effect the NC 2.2 credit criteria), that In order to achieve EQ credit 3.2, all ""Occupied spaces"" as defined in ASHRAE 62.1-2004 must be adequately flushed out. Spaces not classified as ""Occupied spaces"" under ASHRAE 62.1-2004 are not covered by this credit. Further research has found that the ASHRAE 62.1:2004 definition of an ""Occupied Space"" is ""An enclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time"" Based upon the above information, we are seeking confirmation that the following areas within a datacenter facility are not classed as ""occupied space"" per the AHSRAE 62.1:2004 definition - due to their occasional and short occupancy periods - and as such are not covered by this credit and consequently can be omitted from the 14,000 cfm / sq ft flush out calculation. o Server Rooms o UPS / Battery Rooms o Mechanical Rooms o Electrical Rooms To achieve credit EQ3.2 we therefore propose to undertake a flush out of all offices, circulation space and other areas that fall under the ASHRAE 62.1:2004 definition of an ""Occupied Space"", based upon our assumption stated above. Please confirm that this strategy for achieving credit EQ3.2 is acceptable." "The inquiry is asking whether the requirements of EQc3.2 (construction IAQ management, prior to occupancy) apply to areas that cannot be considered as occupiable space (per ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004 definition). The requirements of EQc3.2, namely flush-out with 14,000 cfm/sq ft of outside air, apply to all spaces that are within the building envelope; the credit does not differentiate between occupiable and non-occupied spaces.\n\n **Update October 1, 2013: Applicable credits were updated." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5026" "2007-03-06" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "Our project is a residential dormitory on a university campus. We request clarification regarding EQ credit 3.1. The project is registered under LEED NC version 2.1. The LEED NC v2.1 Reference Guide states that all return air grilles must have MERV 8 filters installed during construction. Our project does not have return air ducts as the air handling units (AHUs) provide 100% outside air to the corridors. There are dedicated bathroom exhaust units that negatively pressurize the dorm rooms, but this air is not recirculated. To comply with this credit, must we filter exhaust air with MERV 8 filters? We intend for these openings to be covered during construction, but we ask specifically for the times at the end of the project when we are balancing and commissioning the systems. We assume that these exhaust grills will not need to be filtered at any time. We have a similar clarification request concerning our fan coil units (FCUs) providing heating and cooling in the dormitory units. These units take air from within the room they are located, heat or cool it, and then recirculate it through the room. We plan to keep these units completely protected until after all work is substantially complete, all dust-generating activities are finished, and the rooms are cleaned. Our questions relate to what has to happen with these units during balancing, commissioning and prior to occupancy. The CIR Ruling dated 10/20/03 indicates that regardless of HVAC protection, ""new MERV 13 filtration media must be installed at Air Handlers immediately prior to occupancy,"" which we plan to do for all AHUs. If our FCUs are protected during construction, we follow our IAQ Management Plan, and rooms are cleaned before balancing and commissioning, are there any filtration requirements during system balancing and commissioning or prior to occupancy? It is our understanding that the MERV 13 requirement would only apply to the AHUs. Could you please confirm our assumptions concerning the exhaust grills and FCUs?" "Based on the description given, there are two distinctive inquiries in this credit interpretation request. In response to the first question, the intent of MERV 8 filtration in return air grilles is to protect all spaces from cross contamination due to construction activities. As long as the exhaust system described is independent and there is no capability for cross contamination with other spaces, then installing MERV 8 filters would not be required. As for the filtration requirements during air balancing and commissioning phase, MERV 13 filters are not required in the system if the filters do not meet the project\'s design and performance requirements. However, this will require that the commissioning and balance testing procedures need to be coordinated when no indoor construction activities have taken place that could adversely affect the indoor air quality. Lastly, to be consistent with previous rulings (EQc3.1 CIRs ruling dated 12/24/2004 and 10/20/2003), the fan coil units would need to have MERV 13 filtration media installed during construction and prior to occupancy. -- *NOTE (Nov 1 2007): Per errata posted in Fall 2007, there is no LEED or ASHRAE 52.2-1999 requirement for MERV 13 filtration during construction. LEED-NCv2.1 EQc3.1 requires MERV 8 filters on return air grills during construction, and for all filtration media to be replaced with MERV 13 immediately prior to occupancy/at the end of construction. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "509" "2003-03-11" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "1. Construction IAQ Management Plan - IEQ credit 3.1 - Credit Equivalence Request This credit, in the 2.1 template, requires that MERV 13 filters be installed during construction and after construction is complete. However, part of our IAQ plan for this building is to not use the VAV air handler until the building is substantially complete, and all dust-generating activities are finished and the building is cleaned with a HEPA vacuum. All openings into the HVAC system are sealed with tape and plastic until this time. The building is presently heated with temporary fan coil units heated by the system boilers. The filters that are specified for the air handler are MERV 6 to 7. Since we will not be running the air handler until the building is clean, and since we have followed and are following a rigorous construction IAQ management plan we feel that we are meeting the intent of this credit without the MERV 13 filters. Can we apply for this credit?" "To achieve equivalence in the absence of MERV 13 filters, it would be necessary to document that none of the ductwork or air handlers were used during the construction process, and that all HVAC components were effectively protected from contamination through the construction process. Photographic documentation of these conditions will be necessary. Clarify that the temporary fan coil units are not connected to the permanent ductwork. Also provide strong documentation of a rigorous construction IAQ plan. Finally, clarify how the dust generated by construction is removed from all surfaces before occupancy, through HEPA vacuuming, flushout with filtration, and/or other strategies. -- *NOTE (Nov 1 2007): Per errata posted in Fall 2007, there is no LEED or ASHRAE 52.2-1999 requirement for MERV 13 filtration during construction. LEED-NCv2.1 EQc3.1 requires MERV 8 filters on return air grills during construction, and for all filtration media to be replaced with MERV 13 immediately prior to occupancy/at the end of construction. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5217" "2009-06-04" "New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "The total area 79,650 SF of the new building is divided as indicated below. 20,940 SF - Data Center with raised floor 13,200 SF - office space, loading, storage and support areas 45, 510 SF - MEP spaces --79,650 SF The data center (20,940 SF) and MEP spaces (45,510 SF) are designed with minimal outside air, which is not occupied by the office staff. The question is: would Performing a flush-out only in office spaces (20,940 SF), excluding the Data Center and MEP spaces shall meet LEED NC 2.2 Credit 3.2 requirements under flush out option? This question is being asked on the basis that only office spaces are truly occupied by the personnel, and data center and MEP spaces are not." "The applicant is asking if the flush out procedure needs to be performed in unoccupied areas within the building in order to comply with the credit requirements. All spaces that are “occupiable,” as defined by ASHRAE 62.1, must be flushed out. ASHRAE’s definition is “an enclosed space intended for human activities, excluding those spaces intended primarily for other purposes, such as storage rooms and equipment rooms, that are only occupied occasionally and for short periods of time.” Typical MEP spaces would not be considered to be occupiable. However, data centers would be considered occupiable since personnel are present more than “occasionally and for short periods of time. **Update October 1, 2013: Applicable credits have been updated." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "551" "2003-06-04" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "The Construction Manager, Ledcor Construction Ltd., the Mechanical Trade Contractor, Fred Welsh Ltd., related and Finishing Trades propose the following Construction IAQ Management Plan for the University of British Columbia Life Sciences Centre. At a later date we will provide photographs of measures to implement the plan and cut sheets of filtration media used. Please confirm that the plan meets or exceeds the requirements of LEED Indoor Environmental Quality Credit 3.1. PROJECT SUMMARY: The Life Sciences Centre is a new 550,000 square feet medical education and research facility for the University of British Columbia, Canada. The mechanical systems are divided into four basic groups: (a) a centralized vivarium, a morgue, and an anatomy laboratory in the two Basements; (b) a public Ground Floor dedicated to teaching theaters, demonstration & seminar rooms, administration and support; (c) four stories of experimental and research laboratories in three wings on the Typical Floors, and (d) Two Atria separating the laboratory wings and connected to the Ground Floor. These Atria have separate air supply systems and can be 100% exhausted at the Roof level. The nature of the laboratory functions and the related high ventilation requirements result in nearly all areas within the facility being 100% exhausted. The Administration offices, the theater-classrooms, and other areas of the Ground Floor are designed more conventionally with a return air component. To segregate the air supply, all the mechanical (and electrical) supply equipment is located in the Basements and all the exhaust equipment is positioned on the Roof, minimizing the possibility of cross contamination. This mechanical segregation of the functioning areas greatly assists the Indoor Air Quality strategy. For emphasis it is worth repeating - all laboratory floors and technical support areas are 100% exhausted; only the Ground Floor functions having re-circulating return air. Strategies for operational economies and heat recovery are discussed elsewhere in the LEED submission. The occupancy of the entire facility will be phased. The Basement areas, the Ground Floor, the Upper Stories, and the Atria can be progressively brought on-line with their own isolated HVAC systems a story-by-story and a wing-by-wing basis without any of that air being returned or being mixed with occupied areas. The Ground Floor and upper stories can be flushed using operating windows and positive pressure. With this simplified summary in mind, the following Indoor Air Strategies will be discussed: 1. HVAC PROTECTION: - During construction, the two very large supply air intake manifolds at grade will be protected from construction dust & debris. Each of the many HVAC air intakes off those manifolds will be blanked. When run for tests and balancing, the perimeter areas will have been hard landscaped and the air intakes will be filtered and those filters replaced following pre-occupancy flush. - As mentioned in the Summary, the typical Laboratory Floors, the Atria, and the Basement areas will receive 100% outside air and can be segregated easily, flushed, and occupied floor-by-floor and/or wing-by-wing without cross contamination. Should the HVAC systems for those floors be used during construction for temporary heat or ventilation, the exhaust air system openings will be sealed off to prevent the accumulation of dust and debris in that exhaust duct system. The diffusers will be sealed in plastic. - The Ground Floor, being the only building area with a return air system, will have all return air openings blocked. If, for some unforeseen reason, there should arise a circumstance wherein the return air system is required, it will have temporary MERV 13 filters installed at each return air opening and will receive frequent inspection & maintenance. The temporary filters would be replaced for the final flush. If inspections by the mechanical engineer discover that the return air ducts have become contaminated due to inadequate protection, the return air ducts will be cleaned professionally as specified. - Two distinct layers of the building are designed to different standards. The Ground Floor and the upper Laboratory Floors are specified to meet SMACNA Duct Cleanliness Guidelines ""Intermediate Level"" standards. More sensitive areas in the lower Basement are specified to meet SMACNA Duct Cleanliness Guidelines ""Advanced Level"" standards. To reiterate, with the exception of the Ground Floor mentioned previously, none of the upper or lower stories have any return air components. - The Basement mechanical rooms will not be used to store construction or waste materials and will be kept clean and neat. - When activities that produce high dust or pollution levels occur, such as drywall sanding, concrete cutting, masonry work, wood sawing, and insulating, return and supply air system openings will be sealed off completely for the duration of the task. To avoid potential contamination of the ceiling tiles which form return air plenums, lay-in tile installation will be delayed until after the drywall, paint and floor finishing is completed. - Pictures of typical methods and procedures will be taken periodically by the Mechanical Trade Contractor and submitted to the Construction Manager in addition to the photographs required under the monitoring section of this plan. 2. SOURCE CONTROL: - Prefabricated insulated ductwork will be protected against moisture during delivery to the job site. Ductwork materials will be stored inside the structure in a dry and clean environment pending installation. - Construction traffic volume will be limited in the vicinity of the air intake manifolds by the time the main HVAC systems are activated. The manifold plenum will be protected and then cleaned and the HVAC units\' manifold plenum filters will be protected and replaced as specified following the flush. Motor vehicles will be restricted to the Loading areas, well removed from any fresh air intakes, preventing emissions being drawn into the building. - Electric or natural gas alternatives for gasoline and diesel equipment will be used where possible and practical. Equipment will be cycled off when not being used or needed. - The specification of materials and products with high VOC and/or particulate levels will be avoided. Careful attention will be paid to choosing products or installation methods with low VOCs such as paints, sealers, insulation, adhesives, caulking and cleaners and to choosing materials that do not breakdown. To further reduce potential exposure during construction, isolation procedures and ventilation with 100% outside air will be used to exhaust contaminated air directly outside during the installation of VOC emitting materials. - A broad range of related air quality design standards within the building following Occupancy are discussed elsewhere in the LEED Submission. For example, EQ Prerequisite 1 for IAQ performance compliance with ASHRAE 62-1999 and EQ Credits 1 and 7 for CO2, temperature, humidity, and air movement are all presented by the Mechanical Engineer. EQ Prerequisite 2 for tobacco and related particulates is achieved by the University of British Columbia\'s strict Smoke Free Buildings Policy. - During construction, a full time Safety Officer will enforce Ledcor\'s Health, Safety & Environmental Program which includes an Exposure Control Program section, governed by the Workman Compensation Board\'s Occupational Health & Safety Regulation 296/97 as amended by Regulation 185/99 and specifically Part 5: Chemical & Biological Substances and Part 6: Substance Specific Requirements. The Safety Officer or his/her designate will wear a gas sampler and/or a particulate sampler during their constant rounds. On a weekly basis, a certified laboratory will test the samplers\' canisters. Results will be monitored and recorded. Any non-complying results will be flagged and corrective measures implemented. The following outlines the material source standards being proposed during construction by type and limit of pollutants (for concentrations all averaging times are 8 hours): Respirable Particulates: 150 micrograms/m" "LEED points are not awarded or guaranteed through the CIR process; the project will need to successfully demonstrate achievement in the LEED application to achieve this credit. Having stated this, the plan as it is described meets the credit requirements. If the plan is adhered to during construction and is properly documented for LEED, the team should be successful in achieving this credit. One minor note, SMACNA IAQ Guidelines lists Appendix C as the Planning Checklists and Appendix D as the Inspection Checklists. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5531" "2002-05-17" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "During the construction of our LEED-registered project, all requirements of EQ Credit 3.1 were met, except we failed to collect photographic documentation as indicated in the submittals requirement of the credit. Assuming that all the rest of the submittals are in order, would a signed letter by our mechanical engineering contractor serve as sufficient documentation for that requirement? We could provide a sworn affidavit, if necessary." "Keep in mind that EQ Credit 3.1 requires that ducts AND other absorptive materials be protected during construction. Some of these steps are outside the scope of the mechanical installer alone. If you don\'t have photo documentation, the letter should describe the steps taken to achieve the protection required for both ducts and other absorptive materials. It would make a stronger case if the general contractor also contributed a description of how other absorptive materials were protected. If your construction IAQ management plan is clearly strong and effective, and other submittal requirements for this credit are well handled, a letter from the contractor describing IAQ management implementation would probably be sufficient to support compliance with the requirements of this credit. If the other aspects of this credit when submitted are weak or questionable, the lack of photo documentation could tip the evaluation unfavorably. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5779" "2004-05-03" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "Packaged heat recovery ventilators (HRV\'s) are commonly used in small systems (3000 cfm or less) that provide 100% outside air. These packaged units are not equipped with fans that can accommodate the additional pressure drop associated with MERV 13 filters. For example, the pressure drop for a MERV 13 filter is two to three times greater than a MERV 8 filter of the same size. Another common problem in small systems is that the pressure drop across the MERV 13 filter is equal to the static pressure for the entire distribution system, effectively doubling the ESP. Larger systems that use air handlers can overcome these problems through the use of larger fans. However, in most cases the relative impact of a MERV 13 filter is not as significant due to the higher static pressures associated with air handler systems. The same cannot be said for small, packaged, fresh air ventilators. It is clear from the Reference Guide and Credit Interpretations that the requirements of credit 3.1 apply to air handlers. However, is the credit criteria also intended to apply to small, packaged ventilators (3000 cfm or less) providing 100% outside air? " "Although the language of the Reference Guide and previous CIRs specifically refers to ""air handling units,"" smaller, packaged systems are not excluded from compliance. In order to meet the requirements of this credit, filtration media installed during construction (if systems are operated) and immediately prior to occupancy must have a Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) of 13, as determined by ASHRAE 52.2-1999. Please refer to another EQc3.2 CIR Ruling (4/5/2004) for further information regarding filtration media. -- *NOTE (Nov 1 2007): Per errata posted in Fall 2007, there is no LEED or ASHRAE 52.2-1999 requirement for MERV 13 filtration during construction. LEED-NCv2.1 EQc3.1 requires MERV 8 filters on return air grills during construction, and for all filtration media to be replaced with MERV 13 immediately prior to occupancy/at the end of construction. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5813" "2002-01-15" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "SMACNA IAQ Guidelines for Occupied Buildings Under Construction is mainly for an occupied remodel. As our project will be new construction, we will not have an occupied building. Can we still achieve this credit as long as we follow the requirements? Our assumption is that the" "The SMACNA guidelines referenced by LEED were written for existing, occupied buildings, but may be applied also to new construction. LEED requires both new and existing projects to follow the requirements, or Control Measures, outlined in the referenced SMACNA document. To achieve this credit, LEED requires that both new and existing projects meet or exceed the SMACNA IAQ Guidelines for Occupied Buildings Under Construction, and protect stored on-site or installed absorptive materials from moisture damage, and replace all filtration media immediately prior to occupancy. Utilizing temporary ventilation units is one strategy to meet SMACNA control measure \'HVAC protection\', but does not on its own satisfy all the requirements of this credit. The permanent HVAC system would still be required to have new MERV 13 filters installed immediately prior to occupancy, for the ongoing indoor air quality of the building occupants. Please refer to the requirements listed in the LEED Reference Guide (formatted version of June 2001, pp. 237-238). Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5838" "2002-08-16" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "The contractors for the Tutt Science Center project plan to follow a Construction IAQ Management Plan that includes the following five steps. We believe these meet or exceed the requirements outlined in the Reference Guide. Will these, along with photographic evidence and filtration media cut sheets, be sufficient to qualify for the point? 1. HVAC Protection --During construction, the return air system openings will have temporary filters that receive frequent periodic maintenance if the HVAC system is being utilized. When activities that produce high dust, such as drywall sanding, concrete cutting, masonry work, wood sawing and insulating or pollution levels occur, the return air system openings will be sealed off completely for the duration of the task. --If the HVAC system is not used during construction, the supply and return air system openings will be sealed off to prevent the accumulation of dust and debris in the duct system. The diffusers will also be sealed in plastic. --The mechanical rooms will not be used to store construction or waste materials. Rooms will be kept clean and neat. --Filter media will meet the ASHRAE requirement for MERV Level 13. Where possible, 80% dust spot efficiency filtration will be utilized. --Upon periodic inspections during construction, if the ducts become contaminated due to inadequate protection, the ducts will be cleaned professionally. --Pictures will be taken daily by the Mechanical Contractor and submitted to the General Contractor. 2. Source Control --Use of low VOC products as indicated by the specifications will be utilized to reduce potential problems. --Traffic volume will be restricted and idling of motor vehicles will be prohibited where emissions could be drawn into the building. --Electric or natural gas alternatives for gasoline and diesel equipment will be used where possible and practical. --Equipment will be cycled off when not being used or needed. --Pollution sources will be exhausted to the outside with portable fan systems. Care will be taken to ensure exhaust does not re-circulate back into the building. --Containers of wet products will be kept closed as much as possible. Waste materials, which can release odor or dust, will be covered or sealed. 3. Pathway Interruption --Dust curtains or temporary enclosures will be used to prevent dust from migrating to other areas when applicable. --Pollutant sources will be relocated as far away as possible from supply ducts and areas occupied by workers when feasible. Supply and exhaust systems may have to be shut down or isolated during such activity. --During construction, areas of work will be isolated to prevent contamination of clean or occupied areas. Pressure differentials may be utilized to prevent contaminated air from entering clean areas. --Depending on weather, ventilation using 100% outside air will be used to exhaust contaminated air directly to the outside during installation of VOC emitting materials. 4. Housekeeping --Cleaning activities will be instituted concentrating on HVAC equipment and building spaces to remove contaminants from the building prior to occupancy. --All coils, air filters, fans and ductwork will remain clean during installation and will be cleaned prior to performing the testing, adjusting and balancing of the systems. --Dust will be suppressed with wetting agents or sweeping compounds. An efficient and effective dust collecting method such as a damp cloth, wet mop, vacuum with particulate filters, or wet scrubber will be used. --Accumulations of water inside the building will be removed. Porous materials such as insulation and ceiling tile will be protected from exposure to moisture. --Photographs will be provided of the above activities during construction to document compliance. 5. Scheduling --High pollution activities that have high VOC level products may need to be scheduled during off-hours. Activities may include products such as paints, sealers, insulation, adhesives, caulking and cleaners. --Occupancy and construction will not coincide." "Most of your construction IAQ plan appears to be consistent with the requirements, with the exception of #5. Scheduling. First, there should not be any high pollution activities if proper source control steps have been taken. Second, the scheduling aspects of this credit are not related to time of day (""off hours"") that materials are installed, but rather to the SEQUENCE in which they are installed. Highly absorbent materials (ceiling tiles, gypsum wall board, fabric furnishings, carpet and insulation, for example) will act as \'sinks\' for VOCs, odors and other contaminants; therefore it is advantageous to install VOC-emitting products BEFORE installing absorbent materials. We suggest that you amend your construction IAQ plan to include directions for scheduling installation of absorbent materials AFTER applications of odorous, VOC-emitting or other contaminating materials. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5903" "2002-01-18" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "The project will employ an IAQ Construction Management Plan that meets or exceeds the minimum requirements of the SMACNA Guidelines. In addition, all absorbent materials stored on site will be protected from moisture. The one outstanding issue in securing this point is the ability of the project to replace all filtration media immediately prior to occupancy. This project, like most high-rise residential buildings, will begin occupancy of its rental units prior to completion of construction. Typically, finish work is still ongoing for units on the higher floors while units on the lower floors are ready for occupancy. The ventilation air supplied to the units is not affected by this situation, as there is no recirculated air in the building. The developer will also replace all filters in the apartment fan coil units immediately prior to occupancy of the unit. We believe that these actions meet the intent of this credit." "This credit can be achieved with the phasing described if interior construction activities do not effect intake air quality for the ventilation system and the filters in the ventilation units are replaced prior to the first phase of occupancy. SMACNA control measures must be implemented in each unit until its construction has been completed to keep unit contaminants from entering the building ventilation system. Include a description of total and unit based control measures in the narrative for this credit. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "645" "2003-10-20" "New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "This credit requires that MERV 13 filters be installed during construction and after construction is complete. Our mix-use project includes window mounted PTAC (Package Terminal Air Conditioner) units for the Residential portion and several water cooled air handling units for the first floor grocery store. There are no MERV 13 filters made that would fit the PTAC units, so we propose to seal all openings on the PTACs with tape and plastic and not use them until after all work is substantially complete, all dust-generating activities are finished, the building is cleaned and the punch list has been completed, similar to a recent CIR. The grocery store water cooled air handling units would be unable to operate properly with the pressure drop created by the MERV 13 filters, as confirmed by the Mechanical Engineer of Record, so we propose to install MERV 11 filters instead. We propose that our strategy meets the intent of IEQ 3.1 and should qualify for the credit." "The credit ruling dated 3/11/2003 provides an alternative approach that removes the need for MERV 13 filtration media DURING the construction process. The ruling, however, did not clearly note that, regardless of the system protection method used during construction, new MERV 13 filtration media must be installed at air handlers immediately prior to occupancy as noted in the LEED Rating System. Although the project is proposing an appropriate alternative for system protection during construction, the equipment does not appear to support the use of MERV 13 filtration media required to achieve this credit. -- *NOTE (Nov 1 2007): Per errata posted in Fall 2007, there is no LEED or ASHRAE 52.2-1999 requirement for MERV 13 filtration during construction. LEED-NCv2.1 EQc3.1 requires MERV 8 filters on return air grills during construction, and for all filtration media to be replaced with MERV 13 immediately prior to occupancy/at the end of construction. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "660" "2003-11-04" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Existing Buildings" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "The Hillsboro City Hall project team would like to submit for interpretation the use of dynamic air filtration devices as equivalent to MERV 13 filters. Attached below is a summary of the effectiveness of this method of air filtration in buildings. ____________________________________________________ Dynamic Air Cleaner application for LEED acceptance LEED clearly recognizes the importance of good indoor air quality for a truly sustainable building design. LEED has chosen to require MERV 13 filtration as minimum filter efficiency for occupied spaces. Unfortunately the MERV rating systems was engineered for measuring efficiency of passive type air filters. Dynamic Air Cleaners are an active air cleaner. ASHRAE recognizes that the Standard 52.2 is not to be used in the testing of active and electronic air cleaning devices, citing fundamental differences in the way they clean the air. Also, the ASHRAE Standard 52 standards were developed before there were accurate means of measuring particle size and distribution. A number of independent tests have been conducted to demonstrate the equivalency/superiority of various configurations of Dynamic Air Cleaners to MERV rated passive filters. These tests are well documented and include various tests where MERV 13 or 14 filters were directly replaced by Dynamic panels operating at a recommended face velocity of 350 fpm or less (angled racks or Super Vs), as well as a number of tests replacing even higher efficiency (95% and even HEPA 99.97%) filters in recirculating systems. In all cases the Dynamic provided equivalent or superior test results when measuring actual particle removal using state-of-the-art laser particle counters. Particle removal comparison to 99.97% HEPA filter Room Size 260 cu. ft Air Flow Rate 300 CFM Tested Device Panel Air Cleaner with aluminum center screen 12x24x1 HEPA Filter Removed 94% of 0.3 Micron Size Particles in 15 Minutes DYNAMIC Cleaner Removed 89% of 0.3 Micron Size Particles in 15 Minutes [Test performed by Life Resources Institute] Dynamic Air Cleaners are non-ionizing, polarized media air cleaners. They employ a high DC voltage (7,000vdc) applied to a conductive screen embedded in a media pad. This creates an electrostatic field between the conductive surface and the grounded external screens that polarizes the fibers of the media pad and the particles that enter the air cleaner. The polarized particles stick to both the media and to each other. In addition to providing high efficiency filtration (98.6% at 0.5 micron in a recirculating system), the Dynamic Air Cleaner offers additional benefits over a passive MERV 13-14 filter: - Dynamic Super Vs have a clean static pressure of 0.15-0.25 w.g. compared to MERV 13 filters in the range of 0.5-0.7 w.g. a reduction of both initial and average pressure drop of 50 to 125 percent. This provides significant fan energy savings. - Traditional filters are constructed of paper, metal and glue - and produce large volumes of material that is sent to landfills. By contrast - Dynamic media fits into a permanent aluminum frame, is made of glass fibers. This can result in up to 90 percent reduction in volume and weight of air cleaning material. - Dynamic Media is constructed of glass fibers without use of any paper or glue. I can be recycled. Investigative work is underway to find recycling centers. - Dynamic Air Cleaners, in an extended surface application, enable the use of ultraviolet light for sterilization. By capturing biological matter on the charged media, a high intensity light can then be provided to inactivate pathogens. For more information on Dynamic Air Cleaners please refer to website www.dynamicaircleaners.com." "Electronic air cleaners are not testable by ASHRAE Standard 52.2-1999 and therefore not acceptable for LEED compliance. While USGBC would prefer to allow the use of effective dynamic filters for compliance, the Council does not wish to accept a method of equivalency in advance of an ASHRAE revision to Standard 52.2, or a new ASHRAE standard. It is the understanding of the ruling committee that ASHRAE is working on with industry participants for a dynamic filter assessment method. LEED acceptance at this time would be a substantial change to the credit as it is currently written and the CIR process is not the forum for changing a credit\'s requirements. Examples of procedures for changing credit requirements are found in the EQp2 Credit ruling dated 6/4/2003 and the EQc3.2 Credit ruling dated 10/8/03. The project team may, at its own discretion, elect to use electronic air cleaners and risk not earning the credit if ASHRAE does not modify the MERV criteria before the completion of the project. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "904" "2004-12-22" "New Construction, Existing Buildings, Commercial Interiors, Core and Shell, Schools - New Construction" "IEQc3.1: Construction IAQ Management Plan-During Construction" "Credit 3.1 and Credit 3.2 both state the requirement to replace all filters after construction (Credit 3.1) and again after the two-week building purge period (Credit 3.2) with MERV 13 filtration. This infers the LEED requirement of the building owner to permanently use MERV 13 filters in all roof top units (RTU\'s) after the building purge period and during building occupancy, as the same filters serve both return air and outside air in the RTU\'s we have installed (typical for most RTU\'s). Is this the correct credit interpretation? If so, we question the value of this requirement for several reasons: First, most typical roof top units provide two-inch thick filter racks within their filter and mixed air section where the return air and the outdoor air are mixed, filtered and delivered to the nearby evaporative refrigeration coil. This 2-inch thick filter limitation dictates the need for very expensive mini-pleated MERV 13 filters to meet the typical 350 to 500 feet per minute (FPM) face velocity at the filter rack of typical roof top units. Lower cost MERV 13 filters typically have a maximum face velocity of 125 FPM, which cannot be used in this application. With the limited size of the filter rack areas (undersized square feet of face area for a lower cost, low face velocity filter), we must use the more expensive mini-pleated MERV 13 filters. Secondly, the higher initial and final pressure drop of the mini-pleated MERV 13 filters (0.55 inches water column - initial resistance to air flow at 375 FPM face velocity*) compared to industry standard MERV 7 panel filters (0.22 inches water column - initial resistance to air flow at 500 FPM face velocity *) has a negative impact on typical roof top units by increasing the amount of fan energy required to operate the RTU\'s at a specified air flow. This fan energy usage increase can be substantial, raising the owner\'s energy costs over the building\'s lifetime while creating a subsequent negative impact on the environment. Thirdly, the higher face velocity, min-pleated MERV 13 filters are approximately three (3) times more expensive than low face velocity MERV 13 panel filters and approximately nine (9) times more expensive than standard MERV 7 panel filters used typically in the HVAC industry. Lastly, to encumber the owner with very expensive mini-pleated MERV 13 filters for the lifetime of their building appears to be an unreasonable side effect of this requirement. On this project, the building owner is a non-profit, community food bank organization where every dollar counts. We question the overall value of using MERV 13 filters in the HVAC equipment when lower cost and lower efficiency filters, when changed on a regular basis, will provide good air quality for the building occupants. In the final analysis, the intent of providing cleaner air quality to the building occupants using MERV 13 filtration has a fairly substantial negative environmental impact from the increased fan energy that MERV 13 filtration will cause. Our request for interpretation is this: In light of the above stated facts, can the building owner use the industry standard 2-inch thick MERV 7 filters in their RTU\'s once we have met the Credit 3.1 and Credit 3.2 requirements for MERV 13 filters? The maintenance and energy cost savings over the lifetime of the building would be substantial. * Published data from filter manufacturers cut sheets." "LEED-NC EQ Credits 3.1 and 3.2 require that MERV 13 filters be used in supply air systems during construction, flush out and immediately prior to occupancy. This is done to conform to the intent of EQc3.1/3.2 to ""prevent indoor air quality problems resulting from the construction/renovation process in order to help sustain the comfort and well-being of construction workers and building occupants"". EQc3.1 requirement in NCv2.1 includes MERV 13 filter installation after construction and prior to occupancy. The use of MERV 13 filters throughout the life of the building is supported by LEED-EB EQc5.1. -- *NOTE (Nov 1 2007): Per errata posted in Fall 2007, there is no LEED or ASHRAE 52.2-1999 requirement for MERV 13 filtration during construction. LEED-NCv2.1 EQc3.1 requires MERV 8 filters on return air grills during construction, and for all filtration media to be replaced with MERV 13 immediately prior to occupancy/at the end of construction. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X"