Entry Type ID Date Applicable Rating System Primary Credit Inquiry (LIs) Ruling (LIs) Related Addenda/LIs Related Resources Campus Applicable Internationally Applicable Country Applicability Reference Guide (Addenda) Page (Addenda) Location (Addenda) Description of Change (Addenda) "LEED Interpretation" "1330" "2005-12-06" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "The following is an alternative compliance path to EQc3.2 for the testing procedure for the detection of 4-PCH: BACKGROUND: The project is a small 1-storey office building. An indoor air quality testing procedure was conducted prior to occupancy in compliance with the EPA referenced standard. The report indicated that all levels were below the required limits except 4-PCH. Unfortunately, the detection limit of the equipment used for 4-PCH was 18-23ug/m3. The maximum 4-PCH level required by the IAQ testing protocol for LEED is 6.5ug/m3, based on the precendent from CIR ruling 11/29/2004. 4-PCH is a contaminant almost exclusively found in carpet backing using Styrene-butadiene latex rubber (SBR). The carpet installed has SBR backing but also complies with the requirements of EQc4.3, which limit the level of 4-PCH to less than 0.05 ug/m2/h, in keeping with the Carpet and Rug Institute\'s Green Label specifications. The project cannot retest for 4-PCH with more sensitive equipment because the building has been occupied for some time now, so the results would be meaningless at this point. We believe we can demonstate compliance to the 4-PCH level requirements through an alternative path, which involves calculating the maximum emissions possible and comparing this with the LEED requirement: Although the carpet contains SBR backing, it does meet the Carpet and Rug Institute\'s Green Label specifications for 4-PCH, which are 0.05 ug/m^2/h. Given that the gross square footage of the building is 9,000 SF (836.4 m^2) and the average ceiling height is 15 FT, the volume is therefore 135,000 FT^3 (3,823 m^3). If we assume the carpet emits 4-PCH at a rate of 0.05 ug/m^2/h (maximum possible emission factor for compliance), then the maximum emission rate the whole carpet could have, if applied to the entire floor area, is: (0.05 ug/m^2/h) x (836.4 m^2) = 41.8 ug/h. Therefore, the maximum 4-PCH emissions that could possibly contaminate the indoor air (without even considering the introduction of outdoor air) is: (41.8 ug/h) / (3,823 m^3) = 0.011 ug/m^3/h Since the maximum 4-PCH level required by the IAQ testing protocol for LEED is 6.5 ug/m^3, it would take 590 hours (25 days) for the 4-PCH to reach this level, if the carpet were inside a sealed box with the same inside volume as the building. Since the carpet is not in a sealed box, and since there will be at worst case conditions at least 25% outdoor air mixed into the air stream, it is reasonable to assume that the 4-PCH levels will never reach 6.5 ug/m^3. We believe this calculation method demonstrates compliance with the credit requirements for 4-PCH levels." "Your proposed calculation method, in combination with the air quality testing, is acceptable to demonstrate achievement of this credit - with two qualifications. First, you state that, ""all levels were below the required limits except 4-PCH"". From your proposal, we assume that the results for 4-PCH were ""non-detect"", but you do not specifically state that this is the case. Clearly, your proposed method only works if your test results indicated ""non-detect"" for 4-PCH. Second, in order to solidify your approach: instead of making a final assumption, complete the calculation by estimating the 4-PCH steady state. Employ a simple calculation for the building as a whole. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1440" "2006-02-23" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "This project is a 147,000 call center. The owner procures air quality testing services on all their new and existing buildings and have done so before they ever did any LEED projects. They recognize the value of superior air quality in terms on worker productivity and avoidance of risk. On this new project the contractor was very diligent in ensuring that low VOC paints, adhesives and sealants were used. No wood materials with added Urea formaldehyde were allowed on the project. The contractor collected MSDS sheets on all these materials. All the carpet meets the CRI Green Label Plus certification. The contractor developed and implemented a Construction Indoor Air Quality Management Plan which followed the SMACNA guidelines for buildings under construction. (The project will not achieve the LEED credit EQc3.1 because there was no MERV 13 filtration provided) In order to ensure superior indoor air quality at the new facility the team is employing air quality testing. Along with testing for the elements required for this credit the team will also test for mold. The testing team is utilizing the EPA Protocol for Environmental Requirements, Baseline IAQ and Materials, for the Research Triangle Park Campus, Section 01445 as required per the LEED Reference Guide credit EQ3.2. The team also referred to the guidelines in the LEED CI Reference Guide credit EQ3.2 for air testing in occupied buildings. The testing began before the building was occupied and the tests for Formaldehyde and total VOC\'s appeared to be within the required levels although all results are not yet in. The testing for particulate level was quite high. The cause of the high particulate appears to be dust in the underfloor area and mechanical rooms. Since the initial testing the building has been about 25% occupied. The underfloor areas and mechanical rooms have been cleaned again. The building ventilation system will provide minimum ventilation rate 3 hours prior to daily occupancy and continue while the space is occupied. The rate of outside air will be at least .30 cfm / sq ft. If levels are exceeded the space will be flushed out by increasing the rate of outdoor air during unoccupied hours. Any additional adjustments to the mechanical system will addressed if needed. Additional testing will be done until all the required test samples meet the concentration levels. Can this method be used to meet the requirements to achieve credit EQc3.2?" "You are essentially asking if it is acceptable to continue the IAQ testing and contaminant mitigation activity while the building is partially occupied. The owner\'s actions are commendable, but unfortunately your proposal is not acceptable. The referenced EPA standard states that flush-out, retesting, and compliance with contaminant limits must all be completed before occupancy, and the Technical Advisory Group has chosen not to diverge from it. Instead, the TAG recommends that you examine your occupancy and ventilation schedules to see if you conformed to the flush-out schedule described in EQc3.2 ruling dated 9/8/04. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "1561" "2006-09-05" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "The East and North Wing Addition project Hospital is comprised of two phases, three new additions totaling 167,580 GSF and renovations of 25,065 GSF. From the owner\'s perspective, these are two separate sub-projects. The overall project includes two attached and one detached building additions, respectively: a) The North Building Addition, at 30,850 new GSF, will house the relocated Central Sterile Supply (CSS), Surgery Expansion (OR) and Food Services Expansion, along with a Mechanical Room to support the new building. This building, which ties the Main Hospital to the Central Plant at the Ground Level, is designed for both vertical (three floors plus a mechanical penthouse) and horizontal expansion to the North. Included within this section is a planted green roof. b) The East Building Inpatient Tower, totaling 136,730 new GSF, will accommodate the relocation of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Emergency Department (ED) expansion, Telemetry Care Unit (TCU), and more Orthopaedic Inpatient beds, as well as a new Lobby, Mechanical Room and Mechanical Penthouse to support the new tower. This tower also includes two shelled floors - the fitout of one floor is an alternate still under consideration at this time. A walled garden off the Level 2 ICU rooms is included to screen patients from motorists and pedestrian traffic. c) A detached metal building, to match the existing Central Plant in appearance, will be constructed to house a new and one future chiller, a cooling tower and a future additional cooling tower. An additional cooling tower replacement and associated piping work is also scheduled within the original Central Plant. We proposed to comply with this credit in the following way: New Construction: In this section, the two-week flush out period will be completed. Renovation: Since this section is renovation, tying into new and existing mechanical systems and accomplished in multiple sub-phases, we propose to comply with EQ3.2 for this portion using the testing methods identified in CIR dated 10/8/2002. Is this approach to compliance is acceptable?" "The building flush-out and IAQ testing strategy proposed is acceptable, provided that existing spaces are protected from construction-related contamination as well as prevention of cross-contamination between systems. Protection measures should follow the SMACNA Guidelines for Occupied Buildings and be outlined in the Construction IAQ Management Plan to ensure compliance." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "1598" "2006-10-23" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "BACKGROUND This credit interpretation request is specific to interpretation of EQ Credit #3.2 ""Construction IAQ Management Plan: Before Occupancy "" under version 2.1. The intent of this credit is ""to prevent indoor air quality problems resulting from the construction process in order to help sustain the comfort and well-being of construction workers and building occupants"". We believe the approach described below will achieve that intent. The Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute Project is an expansion to the Walter C. MacKenzie Center, an existing active treatment hospital of approximately 2,000,000 square feet of occupied space. The Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute will connect to the Walter C. MacKenzie Center through several corridors that will be isolated from the main building until the Heart Institute is occupied. The heart institute is a multi-storey building of approximately 350,00 Square Feet of occupied space consisting of 8 occupied floors each with an interstitial floor above to house building systems. The interstitial floors are completely separated from the occupied floors. The ventilation systems serving the building are configured such that central air systems provide 100% outdoor air to all occupied floors from the 2nd floor to the 8th floor. The main and lower levels are served from air systems that re-circulate a portion of the building air. Each occupied floor and each interstitial floor are separated into a minimum of 3 Fire compartments. Supply and exhaust air for each fire compartment can be isolated by closing smoke dampers in the supply and exhaust ductwork serving the respective fire compartment. The construction and occupancy schedule for the project requires that the building be occupied in stages. These stages would be at a minimum fire compartment by fire compartment and more likely floor by floor. REQUEST We are requesting that the USGBC interpret Credit 3.2 to allow ""Before Occupancy"" flushing to be conducted on a fire zone by fire zone basis for the Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute. All unoccupied zones would be isolated from the occupied zones by closing the smoke dampers and taping off man doors serving unoccupied zones. The zones being flushed would utilize the main air systems to allow for the two-week building flush out period prescribed in the discussion for EQ Credit #3.2. The 2nd through 8th floors are served by air systems designed to provide 100% outdoor air. Therefore there will be no recirculation of the air from the occupied or flush-out spaces. For the lower and main floors served by a system that permits re-circulated air, these systems will be controlled so that 100% outdoor air is supplied through this system during the flush out period." "The CIR is inquiring if it is possible to conduct the two-week flush-out of a building in stages to allow for a staggered construction completion schedule. The inquiry indicates that the building floors and/or zones can be separated physically from adjacent spaces, to ensure no cross contamination from construction in the incomplete areas, while providing 100% outside air to accomplish the flush out. Previously posted CIR rulings, dated 10/17/2001 and 9/5/2006 approve the process for a staggered flush-out approach, provided that existing spaces are protected from construction-related contamination as well as prevention of cross-contamination between systems. Protection measures should follow the SMACNA Guidelines for Occupied Buildings and be outlined in the Construction IAQ Management Plan to ensure compliance." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "2320" "2008-10-08" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "The 9/5/2006 allows projects to provide both IAQ testing and building flush-out in different construction phases. We intend to provide IAQ testing and building flush-out in different areas of the building within the same construction phase. Our project is a high school addition/renovation that will be occupied in phases. The first phase of construction is complete and those spaces were tested, prior to occupancy, based on the credit ruling dated 10/8/2002. The second phase of the project includes a pool and academic spaces. We are concerned that the chemicals used in the pool will adversely impact the testing results. We therefore propose flushing out that space, using the \'purge mode\' on the pool\'s mechanical unit. Based on the 9/8/2004 credit ruling, we will achieve 14,000 cu ft of outdoor air per square foot of floor space in less than 5 days. As the rest of the Phase 2 areas will not meet the flush-out criteria prior to the scheduled occupancy, we therefore intend to provide IAQ testing in the remaining portions of the building. Until both the IAQ testing and the flush-out is complete, we will prevent cross-contamination between areas. Protection measures will follow the SMACNA Guidelines for Occupied Buildings as outlined in the Construction IAQ Management Plan. Please confirm if the proposed compliance path meets the credit intent. If it is not acceptable, please clarify what changes are required in order to meet the credit requirements." "The applicant is requesting clarification regarding the implementation of flush-out procedures and IAQ testing during the same construction phase. As described, the proposed approach appears to satisfy the credit intent. The indoor air quality problems from construction activity in each space are either reduced from a flush-out or confirmed to be minimal from IAQ testing. Please note, however, that IAQ testing procedures for LEED-NC v2.2 are outlined in the LEED-NC v2.2 Reference Guide and are not identical to the testing procedure outlined in the 10/8/2002 CIR (applicable to LEED-NC v2.1). The reference guide has more stringent maximum concentration requirements and additional testing procedure guidelines. Also note, the air contaminants from swimming pool chemicals, such as chlorine, will not affect the concentration levels tested for this credit. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "3701" "2007-02-12" "New Construction, Schools - New Construction, Commercial Interiors, Existing Buildings" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "The project is a 15,000sf fire station in Texas.\nTo protect the building\'s HVAC system, we will be flushing out the building using a temporary heating unit using 100% outside air. We will use the equivalent performance methodology of providing 14,000ft3/ft2 and ending the flush out on the 14th day after construction, while maintaing 60 degrees. This unit will not be tied to the building\'s ductwork.\nThe construction schedule for the project requires that the building be occupied in stages.\nWe are proposing the following plan\n1. Flush out the first half of the living quarters portion by dividing the building with doors and by providing a temporary air-tight enclosure in a corridor. All vents and return air grilles will be sealed to avoid any cross contamination.\n\n2. Flush out the second half of the living quarters portion by the process outlined above.\n\n3. We are not planning to flush out the apparatus bay and the supporting rooms. These rooms do not have doors and open directly onto the bay. The bay does have unit heaters mounted high above the floor that serve to protect the equipment from extreme cold and to prevent the piping from freezing. The supporting rooms do not have any heaters or HVAC equipment. Our understanding is that flush out would not be necessary because of the nature of these spaces and because they are not served by a HVAC system. It would not be possible to flush them out using the standard LEED methodology of using the installed HVAC systems. Further, the bay usually has at least one 14x14 door open when the fire suppression personal are in there.\nOur request for interpretation is if this plan is acceptable." "This CIR appears to be in two parts. 1) Can the project, using the equivalent performance methodology, be flushed out in phases? 2) Can the apparatus bay and supporting rooms be excluded from the requirement for flush out?\nIn response to the first part, previously posted NC v2.0/2.1 CIR rulings, dated 10/17/2001, 9/5/2006 and 10/23/06, approve the process for a staggered flush-out approach, provided that existing spaces are protected from construction-related contamination as well as prevention of cross-contamination between systems. Protection measures should follow the SMACNA Guidelines for Occupied Buildings and be outlined in the Construction IAQ Management Plan to ensure compliance.\n\nAlso, the use of temporary ventilation units to accomplish the flush-out using the 14,000 ft3 / ft2 alternate approach described in the NC v2.0/2.1, 10/4/2004 credit ruling is acceptable, assuming the temporary units are capable of meeting the temperature and humidity targets.\nIn response to the second part, the apparatus bay and supporting rooms are considered part of the entire submitted project and therefore must be considered part of the square footage calculated for this credit.\n\nThe intent of this credit is to eliminate indoor air quality problems that occur as a result of construction. The use of outside air for flushout of the building is intended to reduce contaminants that are the result of the construction process.\n\nIn order to achieve EQ credit 3.2, all ""Occupied spaces"" as defined in ASHRAE 62.1-2004 must either:\n(1) demonstrate that natural flush-out through the use of the 14X14 operable door, and/or temporary HVAC units, provides an equivalent of supplying a total air volume of 14,000 ft3 of outdoor air per ft2 of floor area while maintaining an internal temperature of at least 60" "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5079" "2007-09-10" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "A natatorium space has a very high relative humidity. Innovent, a pool dehumidification unit manufacturer, does not recommend using MERV 13 filters on the return air in a pool application due to the high humidity. This unit has an outside air filter and a return air filter. There is not a supply air filter option for these units. Therefore the return air must pass through the filter prior to the dehumidification process. The humid return air in a natatorium environment will quickly saturate a standard pleated filter with moisture. The saturated filter will have a very high pressure drop and may grow mold and other organisms associated with a wet filtration media. Innovent uses an aluminum wash down filter for this application to avoid the poor air quality and reduced air flow associated with a wet filter. There is not an aluminum wash down filter currently on the market that has a MERV 13 rating. In addition the air in a natatorium space generally has a low quantity of dust and other particulate matter. We recommend that the pool dehumidification unit be exempt from the MERV 13 return air filter requirement associated with LEED v2.1 Indoor Environment Quality Credit 3.2." "The applicant is asking whether the pool dehumidification units can be exempted from the MERV 13 air filter requirement of EQc3.2. Similar to CIR ruling for EQc3.1 dated 10/24/2005, natatorium units cannot be exempted from the credit requirement for MERV 13 filtration during flush out and immediately prior to occupancy. Per CIR rulings for EQc3.1 dated 12/22/2004 and 10/24/2005, LEED-NC v2.1 addresses ""MERV 13 filter installation after construction and prior to occupancy. The use of MERV 13 filters throughout the life of the building is [addressed] by LEED-EB EQc5.1."" As long as MERV 13 filters are used during the flush out and are replaced following the flush out, the credit requirements can be met. The applicant may wish to conduct the flush out before the pool is filled with water in order to reduce the humidity impacts on the filters. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5464" "2004-04-05" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "According to our HVAC engineers, using MERV 13 filters in the HVAC system is like corking the ducts. The filters would ""add approximately .85 of static pressure to our heat pumps. This would more than double the static pressure and cause both undue strain on the motor and also keep the system from serving the required airflow."" Our engineers had to abandon this credit in another LEED project. In short, it looks like a LEED requirement would result in reduced airflow, increased energy use, and potential damage to equipment. In addition, the building flushout wouldn\'t really ""flush"" anything with these filter installed. Have you ever run into this problem before? We\'re assuming we can\'t get a credit here, but we\'re using this free credit interpretation to bring this issue to the attention of the LEED board for the good of society. We\'d also welcome suggestions for a way around this issue whereby we can still get the credit. " "Research, astute engineering and the right product choice can help achieve this credit with little energy penalty, although not necessarily on all projects. Filters are available that have an initial pressure drop of 0.3"" static that can tolerate a 1"" static buildup, at 2-inch and 4-inch thicknesses. Refer to green building (and other) product directories for possible leads. Applicable Internationally. " "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5530" "2004-02-23" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "During Air out we would like to photograph the interior. The photo session would take approx. 8 hours over two days. Are photographers equipment, lighting, etc. allowed? What about props like a plant, computer, framed art work, etc. that will be removed after the photo session?" "The photo session is allowable, as it will have no effect on effectiveness of the flush-out. Note that all finishes must be installed before the flush-out. Applicable Internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5667" "2003-03-13" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "On a large commercial highrise core-and-shell project, the flooring, paints, hallway carpeting, and other pre-tenant improvement finish features are identical on every floor. One floor is aready occupied; the rest are currently vacant (although others will be soon occupied). Because of the time of year, the two-week flushout is not practical for this building, and testing every floor would be very costly simply to document practices that were already performed. We propose that we can meet the intent of this credit by: 1. conducting the IAQ tests in every 25,000 sf space or continguous floor area, whichever is larger, as approved in the CIR ruling dated 9/6/2002, but on only one floor as a respresentative sample of the building, 2. have our mechancial engineer or general contractor certify that every floor is finished identically, and that the occupied floor was finished identically to the tested floor prior to any tenant improvement work. " "The intent of this credit is to eliminate indoor air quality problems that occur as a result of construction. Architectural finishes used in tenant build-outs constitute a significant source of air pollutants, and must be addressed if a project would like to achieve EQ Credit 3.1 and/or 3.2 within the ""LEED for New Construction"" rating system. If significant build-outs remain to be completed at the time of the LEED certification review (as is the assumed case for your core and shell project), EQ Credit 3.2 is not applicable unless the project follows the guidance of the Administrative CIR dated 5/17/2002 (located in the ""Administrative Inquiries"" section) regarding build-out requirements for leases. Testing one floor to represent all other floors in the building is not acceptable, as tenant build-outs invariably contain different types and amounts of materials. Finished spaces can be tested per the referenced standard or as stated in the CIR dated 9/6/2002 (in this section). Upcoming core and shell projects are advised to use the ""LEED - Core and Shell"" rating system that has been developed. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5809" "2004-11-01" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "Response to a ruling issued 1.21.04- 1. The committees rejection was based on the wrong technology. There is some confusion in the field as sometimes non-interchangeable terms are used interchangeably. The committees comments concerning efficiency loss and maintenance are right in re electrostatic precipitators (ESPs): the ionizing plate-type units often called electronic air cleaners. However, this is not the technology employed in Dynamic Air Cleaners. Generically, they are non-ionizing polarized media air cleaners. This category has been in use for decades, although until recently, in primarily industrial applications. From " "The LEED-NC Committee has reviewed this final appeal and, after following all appeal procedures, responds with the following ruling. There is no further recourse in this appeals process. LEED credits commonly defer to authoritative industry standards, especially for technical issues and processes that are extremely complex, such as this one. The petitioner argues that the referenced standard in this case, ASHRAE Standard 52.2, is not applicable to the " "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "5833" "2004-09-08" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "The City of Austin City Hall project is located in Austin Texas. The climate is predominantly warm and humid. Complying with EQ Credit 3.2 (2 week flush out) requires that the outside air be conditioned, otherwise the building will be contaminated with water that will cause mold growth. We are seeking clarification of the amount of outside air that must be introduced into the building to comply with EQ Credit 3.2. We would like a definition of ""100% Outside Air"". 1. Is ""100% Outside Air"" intended to be the air flow rate calculated according to ASHRAE standard 62-1999 using the Ventilation Rate Procedure? In this case, an air handling unit designed to deliver 10,000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) to the space, comprised of 7,000 cfm return air and 3,000 cfm outside air, would be set to deliver 3,000 cfm of outside air during the 2-week flush out, with the return air damper closed and the outside air damper fully open. OR 2. Is ""100% Outside Air"" intended to be the air flow rate that represents the full design cooling/heating load. In this case, an air handling unit designed to deliver 10,000 cfm to the space, comprised of 7,000 cfm return air and 3,000 cfm outside air, would be set to deliver 10,000 cfm of outside air during the 2-week flush out, with return air damper closed and outside air damper fully open. In this case the air handling unit would be unable to deliver fully dehumidified/conditioned air because the entering air conditions would exceed the coil ratings." "The term ""100% outside air"" is defined for this credit as follows. EITHER: 1) As reflected in option #2 of your narrative, supply air is 100% outside air (outside air damper fully open, return air damper closed). OR, 2) to achieve performance equivalence: a) After construction ends and with all interior finishes installed, new filtration media is installed and the building is flushed out by supplying a total air volume of 14,000 ft3 of outdoor air per ft2 of floor area while maintaining an internal temperature of at least 60o F and, where mechanical cooling is operated, relative humidity no higher than 60%. b) The space may only be occupied following delivery of a minimum of 3,500 ft3 of outdoor air per ft2 of floor area to the space. Provide a minimum of 0.30 cfm/ft2 of outside air ventilation to the space for three hours prior to each occupancy and 0.30 cfm/ft2, or the design minimum of outside air ventilation, whichever is greater, during occupancy, for the duration of the flush-out period (until the total of 14,000 ft3/ft2 has been delivered). Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5899" "2004-12-21" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "The project is a renovation and expansion to an existing Visitor\'s Center for a historic village in Southern New Jersey. The entire facility will consist of an exhibit area, auditorium, library, retail store, and various office spaces. The project has reached substantial completion in that all finishes have been installed and all major construction has been completed. The occupants and their furniture will not be moved in until after the flush out, in accordance with the requirements for Eqc3.2. The nature of the sequence of the construction schedule allows for the punch list to be performed prior to the installation of the museum exhibits since the entire building has reached substantial completion. The exhibits in the exhibit area consist of showcases and graphic displays on platforms and panels. All exhibit displays and platforms are being fabricated off site and comply with the Low-Emitting Materials requirements of Eqc4.1. We are proposing to complete the punch list and all punch list related items and then perform the 2-week flush out of the building. After the punch list items have been completed and completion of the 2-week flush out, the exhibit installation will commence and the occupants will return to the building. In the USGBC cir ruling dated 3/8/2004, it states that it is critical that the flush-out occur AFTER substantial completion of construction. Since we have reached this stage including the installation of all major IEQ - relevant punch list items, please let us know if this sequence is acceptable. " "You are proposing a schedule which can be summarized as: 1) reach substantial completion, 2) complete punch list items, 3) perform 2-week flush-out, 4) install exhibits and furniture, 5) occupy the building. This approach is consistent with recommendations given in previous CIRs and is acceptable. Note that LEED-NC prefers, but does not require, the flush to occur before furniture installation. This is to allow the credit to be obtainable for projects that have furnishings installed under a different contract after the construction of walls, etc., which is a common practice in commercial buildings. Flushing after the installation of furnishings and, in this case, museum exhibits, would be beneficial to indoor air quality. Applicable internationally." "None" "None" "X" "LEED Interpretation" "5924" "2002-10-08" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "There are currently two routes through which this point can be earned, either through a two-week flush-out period, or via a testing procedure. In principle the latter method is preferable, both from a technical and logistic standpoint. A performance-based testing method provides hard data on levels of indoor contaminants in the finished building, and does not rely on the assumption that the two-week flush out period will be adequate to reduce pollutant levels to acceptable concentrations. Moreover, in most commercial building projects, a flush-out period of this length will prove to be expensive and impractical. However, we have closely evaluated Section 01445 of the EPA RTP Protocol for Environmental Requirements, Baseline IAQ and Materials, and we believe that this method is also too expensive and impractical for routine use as a compliance assessment tool by LEED applicants. Moreover, many of the regulated pollutant levels could be higher than the allowable EPA maximums in the outside air, especially in Southern California, let alone inside a newly constructed building. As an example, the allowable maximum level of total particulates in this EPA protocol is just 20 mg/m3. We regularly see that figure exceeded in outdoor air locally, especially when the Santa Ana winds are blowing. The following footnote clearly demonstrates that this value of 20 mg/m3 is far more stringent than internationally accepted standards for particulates in indoor air. [Begin Footnote: Currently there are no defined standards in the USA for RSP levels in the indoor air of non-industrial environments. However, in 1984 a World Health Organization (WHO) working group identified that concentrations of less than 100 micrograms per cubic meter (mg/m3) of air were of limited or of no concern. Only when the values exceed 150 mg/m3 they are considered to be concentrations of concern. We suggest LEED adopts the value of 100 mg/m3, eight hour Time Weighted Average (TWA), of total RSP as a recommended standard for commercial office areas, using the estimated occupancy levels recommended by ASHRAE for design purposes in Standard 62-1999 of one person per 150 sq. ft of floor space. Airborne Particle Weights " "Two edits must first be made to your CIR text. In your first footnote, the estimated OCCUPANCY LEVELS for design purposes should be 7 persons per 1000 sq. ft.of floor space (for consistency with ASHRAE 62-1999 text)." "None" "None" "LEED Interpretation" "6013" "2003-02-04" "New Construction" "IEQc3.2: Construction IAQ Management Plan-Before Occupancy" "We are developing IAQ baseline testing procedures for our project. The LEED-referenced document cited under EQ3.2 is for a specific project with specific conditions. We have attempted to be consistent with the referenced project document and would like to have USGBC\'s opinion. Please confirm whether or not the following IAQ Baseline procedures will qualify for a LEED credit under version 2.1, credit EQ 3.2? IAQ BASELINE TESTING PROCEDURE A. Coordinate with commissioning. Upon verification of HVAC system operation, perform baseline IAQ testing. 1. Perform testing for minimum 3 locations in each air handling zone. Perform in the breathing zone; between 4\'\' and 7\'\' from the floor. 2. Collect air samples on three consecutive days during normal business hours (between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm) with building operating at normal HVAC rates. Average the results of each three-day test cycle to determine compliance or non- compliance of indoor air quality for each air handling zone tested. 3. Sample and record outside air levels of formaldehyde and TVOC contaminants at outside air intake of each respective air handling unit simultaneously with indoor tests to establish basis of comparison for these contaminant levels. B. Baseline IAQ shall conform to the following standards and limits: 1. Carbon Monoxide: Note to exceed 9 ppm. 2. Carbon Dioxide: Set points not to exceed 530 ppm higher than outdoor ambient levels. Assess indoor Carbon Dioxide concentrations in accordance with ASTM D6245. 3. Airborne Mold and Mildew: Simultaneous indoor and outdoor readings. 4. VOCs and particulates: Monitor VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in indoor air in accordance with ASTM D6345. Indoor room air concentration levels, emission rates, and qualities of the listed contaminants shall not exceed the following limits. The levels do not account for contributions from office furniture, occupants, and occupant activities. MAXIMUM INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATION STANDARDS Indoor Contaminants: Allowable Air Concentration Levels 1)Formaldehyde: <20 micrograms per cubic meter above outside air concentrations. 2)Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC): <200 micrograms per cubic meter above outside air concentrations. 3)Four-Phenylcyclohexene (4-PC): <3 micrograms per cubic meter 4)Total Particulates (PM): <20 micrograms per cubic meter 5)Regulated Pollutants: