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LEED BD+C: New Construction v2 - LEED 2.2

Lorry I. Lokey Graduate School of Business

5000 MacArthur Blvd.
Oakland, CA 94613
United States
Map

LEED Gold 2010

Goals and motivations

Strategies

Outcomes

Lessons learned

The below stakeholder perspectives address the following LEED credits:

WEc1.1, WEc3.1, WEc3.2, EAc1, EQc2, EQc6.2, EQc7.1, EQc7.2

 

 

Goals and motivations

What were the top overarching goals and objectives?

Rosa Sheng

Project Manager, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

This project's leading sustainability goals focused on water use reduction and recycling, energy conservation and conserving material resources. The major systems employed to achieve these goals include rainwater harvesting, non-potable irrigation, high efficiency plumbing as well as natural ventilation supplemented by displacement air, ample daylighting and solar shading. The integration of these systems support a self-aware learning environment that is dedicated to conserving resources and confirming the school's commitment to socially responsible business' triple bottom line: "people, planet, and profit".

Photo by Nic Lehoux

The Lokey Graduate School of Business at Mills College joins modernism with innovative sustainable technologies in a historical campus setting. The LEED Gold design exemplifies the school’s core values: entrepreneurial leadership, collaboration, and social responsibility. The seamless integration of sustainable design inspires innovation while providing measurable energy cost savings.

 


 

Strategies

What were the most notable strategies used to earn LEED credits?

Rosa Sheng

Project Manager, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

Associated credits WEc1.1, WEc3.1, WEc3.2, EAc1, EQc2, EQc6.2, EQc7.1, EQc7.2

Living green roof

The feature example of the team's integrative approach is a highly visible green roof directly above the indoor/outdoor porch element. While the deep porch provides essential shading benefits, it also offers real estate for a green roof. Not only does it serve as a clearly visible example of the building's sustainability goals for users and visitors, it also reduces the heat island effect for adjacent offices; saves on roof material replacement over the building's lifecycle; provides a natural habitat for local flora and fauna; and serves as essential glare control for nearby occupants.

Photo by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

Photo by Nic Lehoux. The building’s feature example is a highly-visible green roof directly above the indoor/outdoor porch element. While the deep porch provides essential shading benefits, it also provides real estate for the green roof.

Water conservation

Dual-flush water closets (1.6 gpf solids; 1.1 gpf liquids), one-eighth gpf urinals, 0.5 gpm lavatory faucets, and a rainwater catchment system resulted in an 80.1% reduction in indoor water use. The rainwater catchment system captures rainwater from the roof and stores it in a 4,000-gallon underground cistern. This water is filtered, UV treated, and used to flush toilets.

Conserved outdoor green space was planted with drought-tolerant, native meadow grass that requires less mowing and water than traditional campus lawns. Native plantings and trees minimize irrigation needs; in summer months, the nearby campus lake offers a 100% non-potable water source. Vegetated swales divert and filter rainwater before it enters municipal stormwater pipes.

Photo by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

Photo by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. The front of the building features a visible roof scupper that empties into a water retention pond. This water is filtered and allowed to settle prior to being released to the municipal stormwater system.

Energy conservation

Low-tech solutions were supplemented with high-tech controls. The building was oriented to maximize solar exposure during the winter while a deep indoor/outdoor porch and sunshades shield from heat gain during summer months. Natural ventilation with occupant-controlled windows and sensor-controlled clerestory windows are complemented by a displacement ventilation system, high ceilings, and radiant-heated concrete floors. These systems are tied to the building's information controls for optimal user comfort. Low-E glazing, exterior sunshades, and ample daylight from the large ratio of glazing is used to illuminate 100% of the occupied interior spaces, while occupancy sensors reduce heat gain. 90% of the occupied spaces also have access to views of the historical campus landscape. Radiant heated flooring, sensor controlled operable windows, Low-E insulated glazing, and solar shading devices contribute an actual energy reduction below baseline use of 40% gas and 45% electricity. The large ratio of glazing illuminates 100% of the occupied interior spaces while reducing heat gain.

Materials reduction and indoor air quality

The project team selected materials composed of low-emitting VOCs and high recycled content. Polished concrete radiant flooring provided a lasting floor finish and an efficient way to heat and pre-cool the building. The concrete floor also eliminates the need to install and maintain off-gassing flooring products and adhesives. Restroom, break, and credenza countertops were made of 100% post-consumer and post-industrial recycled fibers, including cardboard, newsprint, retired U.S. currency, and other paper. All acoustic fabric panels were woven from 100% recycled polyester reclaimed from post-consumer plastic soda bottles. A Montezuma cypress tree removed from the site was creatively milled and repurposed into tables and benches in the informal break-out areas. Finally, palm wood used in casework was manufactured without added formaldehyde from reclaimed plantation grown palms beyond their fruit-bearing years.

 


 

Outcomes

Aside from LEED certification, what do you consider key project successes?

Rosa Sheng

Project Manager, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

The Lokey Graduate School Building has been featured in GreenSource Magazine and has won four regional and national awards. The greatest success of this project has been the exceptionally positive reception by faculty, MBA candidates, and the campus community. Feedback has reaffirmed the sustainable design goals, including flexibility of users to adapt to sustainable features. The classrooms and public venue spaces in the building are highly sought after for the program's curriculum, lectures, college events, and outside community functions. The program's enrollment has increased significantly since completion of the new building, which the former founding Dean Nancy Thornborrow attributed as "the building effect."

Photo by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

Photo by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Ample daylight not only reduces the need for artificial lighting, but also improves occupant comfort. Views to the exterior also strengthen the quality of interior spaces for academic functions.

Another key success is that the building has exceeded electrical energy use reduction goals. The M&V process identified necessary adjustments that enabled performance improvements. For example, gas consumption has been reduced after determining that the hot water supply was operated above the design set point, and air handler energy savings have been realized after lowering supply air temperature and turning on handlers later.

 


 

Lessons Learned

What one thing saved you or the project team the most time, money, or helped avoid an obstacle during the LEED process? What one thing cost you the most?

Rosa Sheng

Project Manager, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

Associated credits EAc1, EQc2, EQc6.2, EQc7.1, EQc7.2

The integrative approach prevented the elimination of sustainable strategies during the budgeting or value engineering process. A prime example of this was the decision to forgo a traditional HVAC system, fostering the necessity for all building systems to work together to achieve human comfort standards. The radiant heated flooring and displacement ventilation systems are cast into the concrete flooring. The operable windows and clerestory provide natural ventilation, daylight harvesting, and views to the exterior. Sunshades, the deep porch, and the living roof work together to reduce solar heat gain. Because many of the strategies heavily relied on each other to work as integrated sustainable systems, singular elements were not removed from the scope of design. On-site renewable energy was deferred from the project to comply with budget because rooftop PV panels were viewed as less integrated into the design and easy to add later. But the infrastructure and real estate were preserved so that future project funds can complete this original goal. 90% of the original sustainable goals remained intact.

The interpretation and factoring of plug loads for determining energy design was the most challenging. Because of the need for flexibility and optimum connectivity in the classrooms, an abundance of floor outlet locations severely compromised the design model for optimizing energy performance. We submitted a CIR for an exception given that the plugs would never all be used at the same time, but it was not granted.

The M&V report proves that actual electrical energy use was significantly under the predicted calculation for optimizing energy performance. This issue will continue to be a design burden for workplaces and classrooms that require future flexibility of access to power.

 

What was the value of applying LEED to this project?

Rosa Sheng

Project Manager, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

Applying LEED to this project provided a structure to achieve our intent for integrated sustainable design strategy. For the Lokey Graduate School of Business, since the program is still relatively new, LEED Gold certification raised the program's visibility both regionally and nationally.

 

So, what do you think? Help us improve our new LEED project library by completing this short survey.

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Project details
Size
28,734 sf
Use
New Construction
Setting
Suburban
Certified
19 Apr 2010