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LEED BD+C: New Construction v2.2

P-060 Wounded Warrior Hope & Care Center

Santa Maragrita Road @ Lakeside Drive
MCB Camp Pendleton, CA 92055
United States
Map

LEED Platinum 2012

Goals and motivations

Strategies

Outcomes

Lessons learned

The below stakeholder perspectives address the following LEED credits:

SSc6.1, EAc3, EAc5

 

 

Goals and motivations

What were the top overarching goals and objectives?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

The primary objective for this design-build project was to create a world-class Wounded Warrior Complex that promotes and maintains the well-being, morale and speedy recovery of wounded and injured military personnel living at Camp Pendleton. Sustainable design was seen as the key to promoting occupant health and every effort was made to maximize the indoor environmental quality of the interior spaces. To provide a quiet and tranquil environment that supports the therapeutic functions of the facility, the P-060 Hope and Care building incorporates natural elements from the surrounding environment including: natural daylight & ventilation, views looking out to Lake O'Neill, private outdoor shade pavilions and gathering spaces, covered pedestrian access routes between campus buildings, an outdoor track shaded with Solar Photovoltaic panels, an enclosed outdoor pool, and water features throughout the site. Designed to maximize privacy, the P-060 building is sited to provide complete screening for the primary outdoor recreation areas but is constructed using similar building architectural style, materials, colors and accent treatments to maintain a common campus theme & feel.

Photo by Pablo Mason Photography

A 40kW Solar Photovoltaic Panel array mounted on a steel structure provides shade for the 1/8 mile running track while a roof mounted Solar Hot Water Heating system offsets the heating load for the outdoor and indoor pools.

 

Strategies

What were the most notable strategies used to earn LEED credits?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Associated credits EAc3, EAc5, SSc6.1

Using lessons learned from the construction of the neighboring LEED Platinum P-1005 Wounded Warrior BEQ, the project team was able to implement a holistic integrated design process. Whole building energy and daylight modeling, MEP systems integration, and the involvement of Commissioning and M&V agents were facilitated early in the concept design phase through eco-charettes and workshops held with the project owner. For the second phase of the Wounded Warrior Campus, BIM technology was utilized to develop a database of information and create a coordinated, intelligent project model. Combined with a Design-Build delivery method, BIM informed the LEED process by allowing the project team to quantify materials, minimize contingencies, and reduce waste generated on site.

In addition to Building Information Modeling, the LEED Application Guide for Multiple Buildings and Campuses AGMBC) also proved helpful in establishing the synergies on the Wounded Warrior Campus. Because parking, stormwater collection and landscape irrigation systems were centralized for this project, the project team was able to utilize the AGMBC to establish the most effective campus wide approach that met the guidelines of the LEED program and the user's request.

 


 

Outcomes

Aside from LEED certification, what do you consider key project successes?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Aside from LEED Certification, the biggest success of this project was the construction a high-performance facility that supports the speedy recovery of Wounded American heroes. By committing to sustainability and providing the highest quality indoor environment possible, the project team was able to deliver a campus of buildings that set a new standard of "best value" on military projects. The design-build team demonstrated that the construction of high-performance, low-maintenance buildings for the military was not only possible, but both practical and cost effective. By effectively raising the bar for military construction, the completion of the Wounded Warrior campus assists the military in their pursuit of sustainability without compromising the quality of their facilities.

Photo by Pablo Mason Photography

Clerestory windows and full height wall glazing allow natural daylight into the fitness center while eliminated unwanted heat gain.

 


 

Lessons Learned

What one thing saved you or the project team the most time, money, or helped avoid an obstacle during the LEED process? What one thing cost you the most?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Associated credits EAc3, EAc5

Due to the high level of coordination required on this project, the LEED Platinum goals and requirements were well understood by all members of the design and construction team, making the Certification process not only easier but more cost effective. In addition, lessons learned we acquired through the construction of the first phase of the Wounded Warrior project allowed the team to spend less time on training and focus more effort on execution and proper documentation of the LEED strategies. With the LEED requirements well understood by all, our project team was able to establish an accurate budget for LEED related items and dedicate project funds previously allocated for contingencies to site amenities and energy enhancements, improving the energy performance and functionality of the campus as a whole. This included a grey water treatment and dual plumbed water distribution system, a 40kW Solar Photovoltaic Panel array mounted on shade structures around the running track, a Solar Hot Water Heating system for indoor and outdoor pools, and a Measurement and Verification system for all three buildings with a central dashboard in the P-1100 Headquarters Building.

Photo by Pablo Mason Photography

The 25 meter lap pool utilizes a Solar Hot Water heating system that offsets 100% of the heating hot water load for the pool’s surface area. A hydraulic powered access lift provides secondary means of access into the pool for disabled service members.

One of the most difficult aspects of this project was the implementation of a campus wide Measurement & Verification system that incorporated all three buildings and the central plant. This was a particular challenge because the project was constructed in two phases and the Measurement and Verification system was implemented in the second phase of construction. After achieving Platinum certification for the first phase of the Wounded Warrior Campus, the P-1005 Bachelor Enlisted Quarters, the project team and owner agreed that a Measurement and Verification system would be the most effective way to track building performance, maximize the building lifespan, and reduce total ownership costs. Therefore, to provide the best quality product that directly addressed the owner's needs, the project team worked directly with the Camp Pendleton Public Works department to develop an Operation and Maintenance plan that aligned with the long-term goals for the facility. As a result, the project successfully implemented a Measurement and Verification system that tracks system performance and provides the Camp Pendleton operation staff with a comprehensive maintenance package and timeline. In addition, the project team installed a dashboard graphic display system that presents a real-time analysis of building operation, and gives users feedback on-demand for how to improve energy performance.

The coordination of this system proved challenging in a multi-phased project, but through the extended efforts of the design and construction team, the installation of a campus wide Measurement and Verification system became one of the most appreciated elements of the project by both owner and user. For future projects, the project team agreed that the implementation of a Measurement and Verification system could be better facilitated through an Integrated Design Process that focused on coordination between systems in the early phases of the project.

 

What was the value of applying LEED to this project?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

The LEED process proved to be extremely valuable on the Wounded Warrior Campus project through enhanced coordination, increased overall quality, and creating a great sense of pride for the delivery of high-performance buildings that honor Wounded American heroes. Due to the aggressive schedule required by the building owner, and the goal of achieving LEED Platinum, the implementation of the LEED Program required an increased level of communication throughout design and construction over a typical LEED Silver military project. When combined with a design-build delivery vehicle and the use of BIM technology, the increased level of coordination necessary to deliver a high-performance LEED Campus required the project team to solve complex issues early in the process. In turn, this eliminated the need for additional Requests for Information (RFIs) and contingency budgets in construction, and provided the contractor with a high level of confidence throughout the process. This increased level of communication streamlined the construction process and allowed the contractor to use funds originally set aside for contingencies, to be instead used for additional site amenities and energy enhancements that directly benefited the owner and user. With this increased level of confidence, the project team developed an enhanced sense of pride knowing that the project would be completed on-time, on-budget, without complications, and achieve the highest level of LEED Certification.

 

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Project details
Size
29,378 sf
Use
Healthcare
Setting
Military Base
Certified
17 Mar 2012