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LEED BD+C: New Construction v2.2

P-1100 Wounded Warrior Battalion Hqtrs

Santa Margarita Road @ Lakeside Drive
MCB Camp Pendleton, CA 92055
United States
Map

LEED Platinum 2012

Goals and motivations

Strategies

Outcomes

Lessons learned

The below stakeholder perspectives address the following LEED credits:

WEc1.1, WEc3.2, SSc6.1, EAc1.1, EAc2, EAc3, EAc5, EQc6.1, EQc8.2

 

 

Goals and motivations

What were the top overarching goals and objectives?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Associated credits EQc6.1, EQc8.2

Overall, the P-1100 Wounded Warrior Headquarters Building serves as a model for sustainability for the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Military Base, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southwest and all military organizations alike. Moreover, this building provides the highest quality interior environment available for the wounded soldiers that defend the nation. Using a high level of coordination, BIM technology and sustainable design and construction principles, the project team was able to create a model rehabilitation and administration facility that maximizes the quality of life for its occupants and minimizes its impact on the planet.

Photo by Pablo Mason Photography

Curved Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) walls and a circular clerestory use high-performance glazing systems to invite natural daylight deep into the interior space creating a comfortable and productive learning environment

As a high performance office facility, a primary focus for the P-1100 Battalion Headquarters building was to implement a user-oriented design approach to create a productive and comfortable work environment while delivering a high-performance building. This goal was a direct result of the military's commitment to creating a project that provided the "best value" possible in terms of worker satisfaction and life cycle cost. With this as a primary focus, the project team established a goal of maximizing natural daylight and the connection to the outdoors. By using a shallow floor plate, high performance fenestration systems with clerestory windows, and light colored reflective finishes, the project team was able to bring daylight deep into the interior spaces reducing the need for electrical lighting. DIRTT wall interior partition systems and Solatube Tubular Daylighting Devices (TDDs) were installed to invite daylight into private office spaces and provide views to the outdoor environment while allowing for privacy and acoustical control. In addition, interior and exterior shading devices allow occupants to control the quantity of daylight at their workstation increasing the level of comfort and controllability. By maximizing the quantity of natural daylight in this building, the project team was able to offset the electrical and mechanical lighting loads of the building, improving its energy performance and extending the life time of building system.

 

Strategies

What were the most notable strategies used to earn LEED credits?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Associated credits WEc1.1, WEc3.2, EAc1, EAc2, EAc3, EAc5, EQc8.2

To produce a LEED Platinum facility, the project team first examined the building envelope design for opportunities to increase efficiency. The building skin utilized Concrete Masonry Units (CMU) block construction and standing seam metal roof system with R-19 batt insulation in the walls and R-30 rigid insulation at the roof level, as well as high efficiency glazing to reduce heat gain and cooling loads by 50% when compared to a baseline building. To deliver high quantities of light with less energy, the design team invited natural daylight into the building through the use of clerestory windows, roof dormers, light wells and tubular daylighting devices. Once daylight modeling was complete, the design team then implemented a highly efficient mechanical lighting system complete with electronic ballasts, high efficacy lamps, automatic controls, and daylight sensors.

As mechanical HVAC systems were required by the owner due to the sensitive nature of the occupants, the project team decided to utilize a central plant approach to heat and cool all three buildings on the Wounded Warrior Campus. The central plant consists of a ultra-high efficiency air cooled scroll chilled water system, high efficiency gas hot water and pool hot water boilers, an instantaneous, high efficiency gas service hot water system, variable speed chilled and heating hot water pumping with premium efficiency pumps, and dedicated outside air handling units with heat recovery. Once these systems were modeled and their efficiencies determined, the project team decided to offset a major portion of the project's energy use by installing a 59-panel Solar Hot water heating system to offset the surface area of the heating hot water load for both the indoor and outdoor pools, as well as a 100.8 kW Photovoltaic Array to provide 32% of the total project's energy load. Per the LEED EA credit 1 Optimize Energy performance calculations; the P-1100 Battalion Headquarter building achieved a 57.8% energy cost reduction when compared to the baseline building maximizing points in both EAc1 & EAc2 as well as Innovation in Design points for exemplary performance.

Photo by Pablo Mason Photography

Water features and seating areas line the exterior walls of the Wounded Warrior Campus to create calm and peaceful circulation areas for occupants to enjoy while reducing the local microclimate.

In addition to energy efficiency, a primary goal for the project was to significantly reduce water consumed on site. To eliminate the use of potable water for irrigation, a rainwater catchment system was implemented to maintain a native, drought tolerant plant palette. Low Impact Development strategies including vegetated swales and bio-retention basins promote on-site infiltration and recharge of local groundwater supplies. Inside the building, low flow restroom and kitchen fixtures combined with aerators reduce potable water saving 38,797 gallons per year. Ultra Low Flow water closets, dual flush toilets and pint flush urinals reduce potable water used for sewage conveyance by 45,199 gallons per year. Overall, the project reduces total water consumption for landscaping by 88.7% and potable water consumption inside the building by 45.5%.

 


 

Outcomes

Aside from LEED certification, what do you consider key project successes?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Aside from LEED Certification, the biggest success of this project was the achievement of a high quality work environment for the occupants. The P-1100 Battalion Headquarters building earned 15 of 15 points in the Environmental Quality section of the LEED program. This was a great achievement for the project team due to the increased amount of time spent in the design on the building envelop and interior layout to maximize natural daylight and the connection to the outdoors. As a result, the feedback from the P-1100 Battalion Headquarters building has greatly exceeded expectations and the owner has stated that the building will be a model for future facilities to be constructed on the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base.

Photo by Pablo Mason Photography

High-Tech conference rooms utilize low-emitting furniture systems, carpet, paints and wall finishes maximizing the quality of the indoor environment while creating a durable, low-maintenance space.

 


 

Lessons Learned

What one thing saved you or the project team the most time, money, or helped avoid an obstacle during the LEED process? What one thing cost you the most?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Associated credits EAc3, EAc5

A primary element that saved the project team money was the use a single central plant sized to meet the needs of all three buildings. This approach required a high level of coordination early in the project to establish the anticipated demand loads and model potential scenarios of each building. The use of Building Information Modeling combined with the expertise of a third party energy model provided the design team with the information needed to size and select equipment that would be suitable for the phased construction and occupancy of the Wounded Warrior Campus. While this significantly increased the amount of design work in the front end of the project, the result of this integrated design process proved to be the most cost effective solution for the project allowing for greater energy savings than that from independent mechanical systems for each building. In addition to energy savings, the implementation of a central plant proved most cost effective over the life time of the three buildings for the owner by minimizing the maintenance requirements for the campus.

Photo by Pablo Mason Photography

Using a strong symmetrical façade, the P-1100 serves as a focal point for the Wounded Warrior Campus

One of the most difficult aspects of this project was the coordination of the central plant system for the Wounded Warrior campus. This was a particular challenge because of the phasing of the project. As the P-1100 Battalion Headquarters building was to be constructed in the second phase of the project, it was challenging for the project team to understand the future loading criteria of the building from the owner. Once this was understood, the project team invested heavily in energy and daylight modeling of the building during the schematic design and design development stages to fully understand the implications of different mechanical system options. While more funds were allocated to design than originally anticipated, this approach proved successful in the final selection of the mechanical system for the Wounded Warrior Campus. As a result of these additional design efforts, the project was able to achieve significant energy savings that surpassed the original expectations of the owner, and reinvest funds initially allocated for the mechanical system into energy enhancements and site amenities.

 

What was the value of applying LEED to this project?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

The true value of applying LEED on this project was the high level of quality delivered for the building occupants. As the P-1100 Battalion Headquarter project was constructed to serve the administration staff for injured Marines and sailors wounded during their service in the military, it was a mission of the project team to provide the highest quality building possible. In order to deliver this level of quality, the LEED program served as a guideline that helped define the thresholds of quality that would be necessary to consider the projects as a high performance facility. Using these benchmarks, the project team was able to champion issues of environmental responsibility by delivering a solution that challenged their understanding of sustainable design. As a result, the P-1100 Battalion Headquarters building achieved the highest LEED rating of any facility on the Marine Corps Base at Camp Pendleton and is performing at a level of energy efficiency that exceeded all expectations. In addition to delivering a quality product that fully satisfied the needs and expectations of the owner, the project team members that contributed to this building expanded their own personal understanding of environmental design responsibility by experience a level of education through a "learn by doing" approach that could only be recognized through project participation.

Photo by Pablo Mason Photography

Canvas shade structures extend over concrete amphitheaters to create comfortable outdoor spaces for user to gather.

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Project details
Size
11,957 sf
Use
New Construction - Military Base
Setting
Suburban
Certified
17 Mar 2012