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LEED BD+C: New Construction v2 - LEED 2.2

Wounded Warrior Bachelor Enlisted Quarters

Camp Pendleton
Oceanside, CA 92049
United States
Map

LEED Platinum 2011

Goals and motivations

Strategies

Outcomes

Lessons learned

 

 

Goals and motivations

What were the top overarching goals and objectives?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

The primary goal for the Wounded Warrior Bachelor Enlisted Quarters (BEQ) project was to create a high-performance, LEED Platinum facility that supports the recovery of wounded marines and sailors. In addition, the project team attempted to create a long-lasting, sustainable facility that could be used as an example for the Marine Corp to model buildings after.

Photo by Pablo Mason

Constructed using split-face and precision CMU block, a standing seam metal cool roof, and dual pane low-e windows with steel awnings, the P-1005 Wounded Warrior Bachelor Enlisted Quarters (BEQ) is designed as a high-performance, low-maintenance facility with a 100-year lifetime

The military required this project to achieve a minimum of LEED Silver certification. Initially, the project team promised to deliver the Wounded Warrior BEQ as a LEED Gold building, but after initial coordination meetings, it was determined that the project team would be able to target LEED Platinum with minimal additional cost.

 

Strategies

What were the most notable strategies used to earn LEED credits?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

The most notable strategy used to earn LEED credits was an integrated project team. The Wounded Warrior BEQ was able to maximize LEED credits through the synergies created by having a highly coordinated design-build team of designers and contractors working together from proposal to post-occupancy evaluation. In addition to a high level of coordination, the design-build team most benefitted from the use of Building Information Modeling (BIM) on the project to create a clear and informed set of construction documents. In turn, this allowed the team to catch constructability errors before they became problems in the field, create material take-offs to quantify materials and their associated qualities as related to LEED credits, and streamline the construction process by creating accurate schedules and providing a point of reference for the contractor at each phase of construction.

The project team used high-performance building materials to create an enhanced thermal envelope. CMU block and metal frame construction, combined with increased insulation values of R13 and R49 (roof/walls) and a Low-E glazing system, minimizes solar heat gain and loss. An ENERGY STAR cool roofing system reflects solar radiation and reduces internal cooling loads. Natural daylight and views are incorporated into more than 97% of the interior spaces to mitigate the use of artificial lighting and provide residents with a connection to the outdoors. Year-round environmental comfort within the building is provided using a four-pipe fan coil unit system that provides occupants with 100% fresh air and comfort controls for each space.

In addition, the team placed significant emphasis on using local and non-toxic materials. By selecting materials based on their environmental characteristics, indoor environmental qualities and lifecycle cost impact materials, both the occupants and planet benefitted. More than 21% of the building materials contain recycled content including CMU block, concrete foundation, structural steel, insulation, linoleum, and floor tiles. The paints, adhesives, and sealant feature low-chemical emissions, and all wood products have no added urea formaldehydes and are certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). More than 24% of the building materials were manufactured within 500 miles of the site to minimize transportation costs and support local businesses. The construction team created a recycling plan to effectively recycle over 88% of all construction and demolition waste.

In adjusting the LEED target from Gold to Platinum, the project team worked together to move credits that were initially deemed as "maybes" into the yes column by means of additional coordination, diligent construction tracking efforts, and the implementation of a campus wide measurement and verification system. In the end, the motivation to achieve LEED Platinum challenged the design-build team to maximize sustainable design and construction practices and deliver the first LEED Platinum building for the Navy and Marine Corps.

 


 

Outcomes

Aside from LEED certification, what do you consider key project successes?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Key project successes for the Wounded Warrior BEQ included delivering the project on time and under budget; achieving zero harm on site throughout the construction process; maximizing indoor air quality for the building while achieving 14 of 15 LEED IEQ points; and delivering a high-quality facility management tool through the use of BIM that will be used to operate and maintain the building over the course of its lifetime.

Photo by Pablo Mason

Green Guard Certified furniture systems, formaldehyde free & FSC wood components, low-VOC paints, and increased ventilation rates maximize the indoor environmental quality of the interior spaces.

 

What key metrics best define the project's most significant savings or LEED-related successes?

John Amber

LEED Administrator

The energy-efficient strategies used in the Wounded Warrior BEQ project reduce the buildings annual operating costs by $40,190 per year, saving 263,353 kWh per year - a 35% savings compared to a typical building of this type. Inside the building, low-flow lavatories (1.0 gpm) and low-flow toilets (1.28 gpf) result in a combined savings of 911,300 gallons of water per year, reducing potable water consumption by more than 37%.

Photo by Pablo Mason

Building orientation, clerestory windows and high-performance operable glazing systems were key elements implemented to invite natural daylight and ventilation into the building.

Access to natural daylight and views is available to more than 97% of the interior spaces. Over 21% of the building materials contain recycled content, with more than 24% of the materials manufactured within 500 miles of the site. Finally, greater than 88% of all construction and demolition waste was recycled.

 


 

Lessons Learned

What project challenges became important lessons learned?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

A major challenge for the project was the use of BIM technology. A high level of coordination was required to ensure all trades used BIM technology to create their construction documents. Initially, this created challenges by means of the learning curve associated with the software. Once the project team learned to deal with the coordination requirements and front-loaded software information requirements, they were able to capitalize on its clash detection capabilities, catch conflicts between trades in the building model, and make changes to the drawings to eliminate expensive and time-consuming constructability issues in the field.

 

What was the value of applying LEED to this project?

John Ambert

LEED Administrator

Applying the LEED program to the Wounded Warrior BEQ project led to the construction of a high-performance, long-lasting, 100-year facility that provides a high-quality indoor environment for the occupants. It also set forth and standardized measurable and achievable benchmarks for energy and water efficiency, thus contributing to savings for the military in operations and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the building. Lastly, it encouraged the design-build team to push the limits of sustainable construction for the military and create the first Platinum facility for Navy and Marines.

The Wounded Warrior's achievement of LEED Platinum set precedent for the phase II portion of the campus project: a rehabilitation/fitness facility and a headquarters office building completed in 2011. Both of these buildings were constructed to achieve LEED Platinum certification to ensure that all three projects on the Wounded Warrior campus exemplify the highest level of sustainability for the military.

Photo by Pablo Mason

The central core consists of a 2-story volume filled with natural light to create a communal and informal environment where troops play, cook, and relax together.

 

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Project details
Size
66,446 sf
Setting
Rural
Certified
8 Feb 2011
Walk Score®
89