Ninety-two percent of Americans agree: Where we learn matters | U.S. Green Building Council
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During the 2015 Greenbuild International Conference and Expo, the Center for Green Schools shared the results of a recent survey that measures the perceived state of public school buildings and awareness of green issues. The findings of the survey point to a growing awareness of the need for better school infrastructure.

This year, we saw a marked increase in support for improving schools. Up from 2013, 92 percent of Americans believe it is important to improve public school buildings, while nearly two-thirds (65 percent) of Americans feel it is "very important." The results also show a shift of public opinion in the right direction, as American support for green schools is steadily increasing each year—72 percent in 2012, compared to 80 percent in 2015.

There was also a notable increase in the importance of saving tax dollars and conserving energy as reasons for improving public school buildings in the United States. Eighty-three percent of Americans believe saving tax dollars is an important reason for improving public school buildings, up from 73 percent in 2013. Ninety-two percent of Americans believe that saving energy is an important reason for improving public school buildings, up from 89 percent in 2013.

This survey highlights the impact of the green building movement and shows that implementing energy efficiency measures and saving precious tax dollars, so that they can be dispersed in a meaningful way that contributes to quality education, is a growing priority for Americans. Energy-efficient schools will not only reduce our carbon footprint, but also educate generations to come about the importance of the environment and the active role they can play in conserving it.

The survey was commissioned by USGBC and sponsored by Excel Dryer, Inc., a Green Apple partner. To learn more about the results, read the press release or contact Josh Lasky.