What’s New in Fenestration? | U.S. Green Building Council
Please upgrade your browser. This site requires a newer version to work correctly. Read more
Need help? Contact education@usgbc.org

What’s New in Fenestration?

GBCI: 0920011990

Fenestration includes all intentional visual or actual openings in a building envelope, particularly in exterior walls, including doors, windows, curtainwall, storefront systems, and even operable glass walls. Its purpose is first to allow and control (by virtue of opening or operating) the flow of desired elements through the walls such as daylight, ventilation, access, and connectivity. At the same time, since fenestration forms a part of the building enclosure, there is a need to restrict the flow of unwanted things (i.e. in the “closed” position) such as weather, water, the inefficient transfer of heat between inside and outside, or unwanted air infiltration. Since any fenestration system will have varying degrees to which all of these things can be accomplished, it becomes incumbent on architects and other design professionals to understand the realistic and steadily improving capabilities of different types of fenestration. While none are capable of matching the overall weather resistance and energy tightness of an opaque, well-sealed, and well-insulated wall, it is important to be able to assess how a particular fenestration product can help or hinder any particular building project—whether new or renovation. With all of the above in mind, we will delve into several specific types of commonly available fenestration in terms of their performance in the context of some of the latest improvements currently available.
Eligible for 1 CE HOUR.
  • 1 CE

0

About

Fenestration includes all intentional visual or actual openings in a building envelope, particularly in exterior walls, including doors, windows, curtainwall, storefront systems, and even operable glass walls. Its purpose is first to allow and control (by virtue of opening or operating) the flow of desired elements through the walls such as daylight, ventilation, access, and connectivity. At the same time, since fenestration forms a part of the building enclosure, there is a need to restrict the flow of unwanted things (i.e. in the “closed” position) such as weather, water, the inefficient transfer of heat between inside and outside, or unwanted air infiltration. Since any fenestration system will have varying degrees to which all of these things can be accomplished, it becomes incumbent on architects and other design professionals to understand the realistic and steadily improving capabilities of different types of fenestration. While none are capable of matching the overall weather resistance and energy tightness of an opaque, well-sealed, and well-insulated wall, it is important to be able to assess how a particular fenestration product can help or hinder any particular building project—whether new or renovation. With all of the above in mind, we will delve into several specific types of commonly available fenestration in terms of their performance in the context of some of the latest improvements currently available.

Objectives

  1. Identify energy ratings and certifications of window and fenestration systems as defined by national programs suitable for all buildings, including green building design and renovation.
  2. Assess and compare the energy performance and other attributes of different types of fenestration systems suitable for green buildings, renovations, and other designs.
  3. Investigate the significance of different fenestration components, including frame materials, glazing, and spacers, related to optimizing energy performance in green buildings.
  4. Explore different types of fenestration products that combine multiple components to achieve overall performance and aesthetic results.
Learn more
Please note: This course is offered on another organization's website, which means that you must leave usgbc.org to view this course. Would you like to proceed?
Intermediate

Created by

BNP Media
Troy, MI
United States

Leaders

  • 1
    Peter J. Arsenault FAIA LEED AP made 1 contribution in the last 6 months

Peter J. Arsenault FAIA LEED AP

Principal Peter J. Arsenault, Architect