17th Annual Hawaii Build & Buy Green | U.S. Green Building Council
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Conference

17th Annual Hawaii Build & Buy Green

Register for event
Starts On - October 13, 2017 - 7:30am
Ends On - October 13, 2017 - 5:00pm
1202 Prospect St
Honolulu , HI 96822

Join us for the 17th annual Hawaiʻi Build + Buy Green Conference: Celebrating Collaboration, Creativity, and Curriculum in Hawaii's Green Schools. This annual event brings together nationally acclaimed speakers and local experts in the fields of green schools and campuses, design, engineering, construction and development.

Don't miss this opportunity to learn about the latest in green building projects, programs, and solutions while earning continuing education credits. This year the conference will be a green event and held on Friday, Oct. 13 at Stevenson Middle School's Science and Technology Center.

Registration includes breakfast and lunch. Afternoon site visits will feature 4 green school sites in the Makiki and Manoa neighborhoods. Shuttle transportation will be provided via a biodiesel bus or electric vehicles.

Build and Buy Green 2017 will be approved by GBCI and AIA for CEU credits.

Highlights

  • Education sessions spotlighting STEM, HI-CHPS, LEED and net zero energy buildings
  • Afternoon tours of four green school projects in the Makiki and Manoa neighborhood: Project Frog at the UH College of Education, Punahou's 2-5 Neighborhood, Halau Ku Mana's Public Charter School campus, and Stevenson Middle School Science and Technology Center
  • Engaging panel sessions with designers, project managers and school leaders regarding integrated planning and design
  • Networking opportunities

Audience
Who should attend: architects, engineers, planners, LEED project managers, policy makers, general contractors, sub-contractors, trades, administrators, educators and students.

Registration costs
Pre-registration required. There will be no on-site registration.

Student with valid ID/teachers/administrators USGBC Hawaii/AIA Honolulu/ASLA Hawaii members Nonmember
Now to Oct. 12 $40 $60 $70

Memberships will be verified. If you are not a USGBC Hawaii member (an individual membership, not your company membership) you will be asked to pay the non-member pricing. Purchase a membership, or contact hawaii@usgbc.org to verify your membership.



Friday, October. 13

7:30-7:55 a.m. Registration and continental breakfast
7:55-8 a.m.

Opening by USGBC Hawaii

Speaker: Melanie Islam, D.Arch, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, USGBC Hawaii

8-8:30 a.m.

Opening Keynote

Speaker: Herb Lee Jr., Executive Director, Pacific American Foundation
"The Promise of Place: A story of place, people and innovation"

8:30-9:45 a.m.

Track: Integrating Curriculum and Environment

Sessions:

9:45-10 a.m. Morning Break / Visit the Tesla, BMW, Bolt and Volt Demo Car and other electric vehicles
10-11:30 a.m.

Track: Getting to Net Zero Energy

Sessions:

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Track: Future Ready and Community Engagement

Sessions:

12:30-1 p.m. Boxed Lunch / Visit the Tesla, Bolt, and Volt Demo Car and other electric vehicles
12:45-1 p.m. Message from Rep. Chris Lee
1-5 p.m.

School Site Tours


Session descriptions

Opening Keynote: "The Promise of Place: A story of place, people and innovation"
There are a multitude of ways in which places embody local cultural identities. Space and architecture are shaped by the culture and the identities of communities as much as those communities are shaped by their perception and use of space and architecture.

This session will explore the story of place through the lens of the stewardship of Waikalua Loko, a 400 year-old Hawaiian fishpond. A place-based approach to education helps people discover and embrace heritage and carry forward practices to lead a more sustainable future.

Stevenson Middle School Science and Technology Center
The Stevenson Middle School STEM Science and Technology Center was designed to be LEED 2009 For Schools Silver Equivalent. As a new building on existing school, it aimed to avoid impacts to campus greenspace, utilizing existing school circulation and maximizing open spaces; high reflective roofing and large canopy trees were to reduce heat islands; native landscaping with drip irrigation and resulting potable water reduction of 50% from baseline; calculated Energy reduction of almost 40% through uses of high-efficiency HVAC systems and natural ventilation; 3.1 KW PV system provided for learning tool; enhanced Commissioning; construction IAQ MP; construction Waste Mgmt Plan and achieved 75% non-hazardous waste diversion from landfill; 35% Indoor Water use reduction; daylight and views from all occupied rooms >90% compliance; outdoor learning environments provided at new covered plaza and 2nd floor lanai; rainwater catchment system for roof garden; all “no” or “low” VOC materials.

Integrated Design and Planning for 21st Century Learning Environments at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama Campusbr> Kamehameha Schools’ approach to 21st Century Learning is to create a world-class Hawaiian culture-based education system that embraces modern educational methodology and technology to better prepare its students for the challenges of the future. To accomplish this, Kamehameha Schools integrates Four Guiding Design Criteria: Cultivate Hawaiian Identity and Christian Values; Develop Student-Centered Learning Environments; Provide Climate-Appropriate Facilities; and Enhance Campus Comfort, Safety, and Efficiency. Each Design Criteria plays an important role in the organization’s decision-making – from planning to design; from the land, its resources, and the natural environment as a whole; and to the building itself and spaces in-between. More importantly, each of the Four Guiding Design Criteria addresses the integration of relationships between the values of Kamehameha Schools, the various stakeholders, and the community of Hawaiʻi upon which it serves.

Hawaiian Garden and Community Design at Punahou’s new grades 2 to 5 Classrooms
The outdoors form an integral part of a student’s educational experience, and the new neighborhood envisions outdoor environments that range from open lawns to exploratory spaces to areas that deliberately incorporate opportunities for Hawaiian studies and sustainability education. Features include terracing on the slope above Ka Punahou for lo‘i kalo and native plants; a natural forest environment on the mauka slope of Barwick Playground; and an outdoor amphitheater.

"First Net-Zero Classrooms at University of Hawaii of Mānoa"
Two net-zero classroom buildings are proud additions to the UH Mānoa campus. Last fall, two 1,400-square-foot Flexible Response to Ongoing Growth (FROG) classrooms were put into action at the College of Education. Funded by the Office of Naval Research and managed by UH Mānoa’s Hawaiʻi Natural Energy Institute, these structures will provide valuable data on the effects of energy use and building design on energy demand. It is part of a larger research program intended to evaluate the performance and integration of a range of energy technologies.

The classrooms incorporate real-time dashboards that display climate, indoor comfort indicators and disaggregated energy use. As an educational tool, the dashboard will foster more efficient behavior by allowing users to visualize their energy use and provide data for developing STEM-based curricula. Features include: LED lighting with sensors that respond to the amount of natural daylight; highly insulated walls and ceilings; high-performance glazing; and 5-kW photovoltaic arrays. They are “mixed-mode”, using both natural ventilation and air conditioning. The structures are being used to test technologies such as energy storage, advanced occupancy sensing and fan control.

Kihei High School Net Zero Energy Campus
This presentation will focus on the design concepts and sustainable strategies being implemented for Kihei High School on Maui. The brand-new campus is being designed from the ground up to incorporate the latest passive green strategies that will be used as a model for future DOE projects throughout the state. With an ultimate goal of net zero energy, the campus is being designed to take full advantage of the abundant sunlight and natural forces found throughout the site. We will discuss various green strategies that were explored and how they will be implemented throughout the project to achieve the goals of sustainability and good design.

Learn how you can receive incentives for putting Energy Efficiency first
By integrating energy efficiency into your design, you can decrease your energy demand, which will reduce the size of the investment needed for your renewable energy system. Hawai‘i Energy incentives are available for a wide variety of measures and technologies.

Follow the Drop - Water Management Decision Making Mobile Application for Students
The Follow the Drop - Stormwater curriculum uses the school campus as a mini-watershed. Students will learn about Hawaii’s Freshwater Initiative and how to identify (grey) stormwater infrastructure features and identify those that could become “opportunities” to implement green infrastructure best management systems (such as rain gardens and rain catchment) to capture or recharge the stormwater onsite. The mobile application is a data collection and analysis - decision tool to support the Follow the Drop- Stormwater curriculum.

Green Apple Day of Service and projects at Halau Ku Mana Public Charter School
The Green Apple Day of Service gives parents, teachers, students, companies, and local organizations the opportunity to transform schools into healthy, safe, and productive learning environments through a local service project. One of our recent service projects paired volunteer members of the USGBC Hawaii with the Halau Ku Mana Public Charter School to reduce the impacts of storm water runoff on an outdoor learning space. Volunteers from the USGBC Hawaii designed and created a french drain to rain garden filtration system that can also serve as an onsite educational feature. This project showed that by working together as a community, we can create sustainable solutions and outdoor learning opportunities for schools on a limited budget.

School site tour: College of Education/UH Laboratory School Project Frog
Two net-zero classroom buildings are proud additions to the UH Mānoa campus. Last fall, two 1,400-square-foot Flexible Response to Ongoing Growth (FROG) classrooms were put into action at the College of Education. Funded by the Office of Naval Research and managed by UH Mānoa’s Hawaiʻi Natural Energy Institute, these structures will provide valuable data on the effects of energy use and building design on energy demand. It is part of a larger research program intended to evaluate the performance and integration of a range of energy technologies.

School site tour: Halau Ku Mana Public Charter School
Hālau Kū Māna Public Charter School is a charter school that provides quality community, culture, and kaina (land/ocean)-based education for middle and high school students. With expectations of both academic and cultural rigor, students are more responsive to hands-on, inter-disciplinary learning that has relevance to the host culture, environment, history, and contemporary issues and opportunities.

A 3-time Green Apple Day of Service School, through community effort and support of USGBC Hawaii, Hālau Kū Māna Public Charter School, has installed a 250 rainwater catchment system, native landscaping and gardens, and low impact development stormwater management strategies.

School site tour: Punahou School 2-5 Campus
The comprehensive redesign of Punahou’s Junior School that began with Case Middle School and continued with the Omidyar K – 1 Neighborhood to create new facilities for students in grades 2 – 5.

For several years, Punahou’s Junior School faculty has explored inquiry-based, interdisciplinary instruction that creates a highly personalized learning experience for children. The new instructional environment will facilitate authentic learning experiences that unleash each child’s interests and passions.

The outdoors form an integral part of a student’s educational experience, and the new neighborhood envisions outdoor environments that range from open lawns to exploratory spaces to areas that deliberately incorporate opportunities for Hawaiian studies and sustainability education. Features include terracing on the slope above Ka Punahou for lo‘i kalo and native plants; a natural forest environment on the mauka slope of Barwick Playground; and an outdoor amphitheater.

School site tour: Stevenson Middle School Science and Technology Center
Stevenson Middle School recently became the DOE’s first Science Signature School. The new 21,500 net-square-foot facility combines state-of-the-art technology with a sustainable architectural design to create a 21st Century Learning environment for students.

The Science Center provides Physical Science, Biology, Earth/Space and STEM/Robotics classrooms, a covered science plaza, and a multipurpose building. A south facing stargazing telescope deck on the second floor supplements the school’s astronomy program. The double height STEM/Robotics space is designed to facilitate viewing of interschool robotics competitions involving 24 Oahu schools.

Project was designed to meet LEED for Schools v2009 Silver equivalency.


Volunteers can earn GBCI continuing education units (CEUs) by contributing to the success of Hawaii Build + Buy Green 2017. Up to 50 percent of your CEUs can be for volunteering.

We will provide volunteers with complimentary admission to the event (outside of volunteer shift), including food and beverages. It's a great opportunity to connect with Hawaii's leading architects, engineers and contractors in green building. Volunteers must be reliable, committed to fulfilling their volunteer duties, comfortable in a professional setting, and eager to help. Complete the Volunteer Registration form to sign-up.

Volunteer shifts

  • Set-up: 6:30-8 a.m.
  • Registration guides: 7:15-8:15 a.m.
  • Lunch/Tour gathering docents: 12-1 p.m.
  • Clean-up: 1:30-3 p.m.
Sign up to be a volunteer